Meet Dr. Elisa Corrales

CHOC Children’s wants referring providers to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Elisa Corrales, a pediatric psychologist.

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I completed my bachelor’s degree at the University of California, Davis where I majored in psychology. I earned my master’s and doctorate degrees in clinical psychology at The University of Rochester in New York. While there, my research interests included studying factors of resilience in maltreated Latino children and identyfying patterns of neuroendocrine functioning and behaviroal outcomes in maltreated and non-maltreated populations. After graduate school, I completed both my predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), where I gained specialized training in parent-child interaction therapy, individual child and family therapy, and the diagnosis and treatment of children with various developmental disabilities including autism spectrum disorders. At CHLA, I also completed the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilitites (LEND) Training Program and gained vast experience working with interdisciplinary teams and pediatric populations.

Q: What are your administrative appointments?

A: Currently, I am working as a pediatric psychologist in CHOC’s co-occurring clinic, which specializes in working with children who face both a chronic medical condition and mental health concerns. I recently joined one of our primary care pediatricians in a clinic focused on ensuring the safety and well-being of children and families in Orange County who have been referred to social services often for suspected child abuse or neglect. In this clinic, I provide needed mental health consultation, psychoeducation, case management and support.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A:  Throughout the years, I have specialized in working with children who often present with difficult or severe behavioral issues. I also specialize in treating children who have been victims of trauma or child maltreatment.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?

A:  One year.

Q: What are some new programs or developments within your specialty?

A:  As part of CHOC’s mental health initiative, the psychology department will be starting the intensive outpatient program within the next year. This program will be dedicated to working with children who are struggling with complex issues. The aim of the program is to prevent re-hospitalization.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses? A: The majority of children I work with are often stuggling with issues of depression and/or anxiety.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?

A: A few years ago, my youngest child suddenly and unexpectedly became very ill and I found myself living at CHOC for approximately two weeks. It was one of the most frightening and emotionally difficult times in my life, but I was able to experience firsthand the amazing care provided by both the CHOC medical and mental health teams. Despite the fact that we were one family among many in the unit, my family was always treated with compassion and sensitivity; everyone who walked in the room was dedicated to helping my family. I am forever grateful for the support I recieved, and after that experience I decided that the CHOC team was without a doubt one that I wanted to join.

Q: What excites you most about CHOC’s mental health initiative?

A: I am excited that we will be able to help even more children in Orange County and provide specialized care to populations of children in critical need.

Q: Why did you decide to become a doctor?

A:  Before I applied to graduate school, I was working as a probation officer in the Sacramento County juvenile hall. I worked with children on daily basis who were in need of mental health treatment and not incarceration; after this experience, I was committed to working with struggling youth.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A:  I would love to be a chef or attend culinary school.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: I love dancing —salsa and cumbia are my favorite. I also love cooking.

Q: What have you learned from your patients?

A: Never underestimate resilience in children. In the face of extreme adversity, many children can succeed and will accomplish just about anything.

CHOC Children’s Honored as a National Leader in Maintaining Outstanding Employee Engagement

CHOC Children’s has been awarded The Advisory Board Company’s 2017 Workplace of the Year Award for its commitment to fostering and maintaining high levels of employee engagement. CHOC is one of 20 organizations nationwide, and one of only two freestanding children’s hospitals, to receive the award.

“CHOC’s vision to be the leading destination for children’s health by providing exceptional and innovative care starts with its extraordinary and engaged employees. That’s one of the reasons we work so hard to foster engagement and create a best place to work,” said Tom Capizzi, CHOC’s vice president, human resources. “We create opportunities, including an annual survey, whereby our employees can feel comfortable in providing us their candid feedback so we can continue to honor our commitment to them, as well as to our patients and their families.”

Engaged employees, as defined by The Advisory Board Company, are those who exhibit both loyalty and commitment to the organization. These employees are willing to expend discretionary effort, often going above and beyond to help the organization succeed. The award recognizes CHOC’s commitment to creating a best-in-class work environment for its employees.

“Engaging the workforce is arguably more important now than ever before, with all signs indicating that we are heading into a staffing shortage,” said Steven Berkow, executive director, Survey Solutions at The Advisory Board Company. “With a significant portion of the workforce retiring in the coming years and non-traditional employers encroaching on talent, hospitals and health systems must be laser-focused on engaging their staff. Our award winners have demonstrated an impressive ability to inspire the highest levels of engagement across the country while maintaining remarkably low levels of disengagement.”

Meet Dr. Reshmi Basu

CHOC Children’s wants its medical staff and patients to get to know its growing team of physicians, including primary and specialty care providers. Today, meet one of our pediatricians Dr. Reshmi Basu.   Following medical school at University of California, San Diego, she completed her residency at CHOC. She’s been a member of the CHOC medical staff for eight years.

What are your clinical interests?

I am especially interested in asthma, sleep issues in children (infants through adolescents), and helping new mothers breastfeed.

Are you involved in any research?

I am a physician leader for the American Academy of Pediatrics, Chapter Quality Network U.S. Immunization Project. Practices here in Orange County and across the nation are participating in the project to improve vaccination rates for children two years and younger.

What are your most common diagnoses?

In our practice, we see a lot of patients with viral respiratory illnesses, ear infections, abdominal pain, asthma, allergies, eczema and headaches. We also spend much of our time on routine well checks for infants, teens and young adults. These appointments are important for keeping children current on vaccinations, and making sure they are growing and developing normally. We work hard to address parents’ concerns during these visits, as well.

What inspires you most about the care being delivered at CHOC?

I am proud to be a CHOC Children’s provider because CHOC undoubtedly provides the highest quality of care for patients and families. One of my patients was being treated for cancer during the holidays. Not only did CHOC make sure she received the most advanced medical care, the hospital’s child life team did everything they could to bring the holidays to her. Her room was filled with inspirational banners, Christmas lights and even beautiful new bedding on her hospital bed.

When did you decide to become a pediatrician?

I decided to become a pediatrician after my pediatrics rotation in medical school. I had always liked working with children, and was already drawn to pediatrics after volunteering at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital. (I grew up in Mission Viejo.) As a volunteer, I enjoyed spending time at the hospital, whether it was holding the babies or coloring with children. After my pediatrics rotation, though, I realized that children need advocates to fight for them, and that is something I wanted to do. My goal is to help all my patients grow and thrive to become healthy, successful adults.

If you weren’t a physician, what you be and why?

I pursued medicine and eventually pediatrics because of my interest in science and my love for children. If I wasn’t a pediatrician, then I think being a teacher would be another way for me to help children.

What are your hobbies and interests outside of medicine?

I enjoy spending time with my husband and children. I have a 5-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son who keep me very busy. We like being outdoors, whether it’s playing at the park or riding our bikes. We travel as often as we can. I also like to read, when I can find any free time.

What’s the funniest thing a patient said to you?

Several of my pre-school aged patients have told me I look like Doc McStuffins. This helps me to connect with them and put them more at ease during their visits. I dressed up as Doc McStuffin for Halloween a few years ago, and my younger patients were star struck!

Dr. Basu and her colleagues at Pediatric & Adult Medicine, Inc. are part of the CHOC Children’s Primary Care Network. You can reach her at 714-565-7960.

CHOC-HOSTED INAUGURAL PACIFIC COAST FETAL CARDIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM PROVIDES VITAL EDUCATION

CHOC Children’s leads the way in fetal cardiology and fetal echocardiography, and recently shared its expertise at its first “Pacific Coast Fetal Cardiology 2017: An Interactive and Case-based Education Symposium.” Held at the Marriott Hotel, Newport Beach, the conference brought together nurses, sonographers, physicians, trainees and health care professionals from 50 different organizations across the country.

Led by Dr. Wyman Lai, medical director of echocardiography and co-medical director of the CHOC Children’s Heart Institute, and Anita Moon-Grady, from University of California, San Francisco, the event provided vital education on how to detect serious heart defects during pregnancy, and how to discern when to refer to a fetal cardiology specialist for further testing, counseling and intervention. Additionally, education was provided on  the current International Society for Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology (ISUOG) and American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) guidelines, including: how to improve screening efficacy; acquire the ability to rule out or assess for selected complex anomalies during fetal cardiology screening; diagnose obstructive left heart lesions and counsel families on treatment options and prognoses; use key features reviewed to diagnose heterotaxy syndrome; counsel patients on the benefits and limitations of early fetal echocardiography; and diagnose tetralogy of Fallot, its variants and when to refer to a pediatric cardiologist for treatment.

More than a dozen cases were presented by various speakers and featured obstructive left heart lesions, Heterotaxy syndromes, early fetal echocardiography and variants of tetralogy of Fallot. Keynote speakers included Dr. Wayne Tworetzky from Boston Children’s and Dr. Lynn Simpson from Columbia.

Dr. Neda Zadeh, CHOC geneticist, presented, “Understanding Fetal Screening for Chromosomal Abnormalities.” No screening test can detect all birth defects, she explained; however, diagnostic testing is the “gold standard”for prenatal diagnosis of a chromosomal abnormality. CHOC pediatric cardiologist, Dr. Pierangelo Renella, provided an in-depth clinical presentation, “Coarctation of the Aorta versus Interrupted Aortic Arch.”

A major highlight of the conference was a live demonstration of a fetal echocardiogram performed by Dr. Wyman Lai on a pregnant patient with a fetus who presented with tetralogy of Fallot. As he demonstrated the procedure on the large screen, attendees were enthralled with Dr. Lai’s presentation and diagnosis.

Learn more about CHOC’s Heart Institute and fetal echocardiography program

Find upcoming conferences and events: CHOC’s Continuing Medical Education

Join Us For CHOC Charity Golf Classic on May 15

An annual golf tournament, “CHOC Charity Classic” benefiting CHOC Children’s is set for Monday, May 15, at the Pelican Hill Golf Club in Newport Beach.

Presented by Cigna, the popular event attracts leading business leaders and golf enthusiasts in support of our community’s children and the future of their health and well being.

Participants will enjoy 18 championship holes on Pelican Hill’s north and south courses, continental breakfast, box lunch, raffle, and a barbecue reception.

Click here for the entry form, sponsorship opportunities and more.