Submit an Idea through the Innovation Lab

Did you know CHOC Children’s has partnered with the Innovation Lab as part of the Innovation Institute to help CHOC caregivers commercialize healthcare product ideas?

Click here for “Turning Your Idea Into a Marketed Medical Device,” by American Association for Physician Leadership.

To learn more contact Suzy Engwall, national director of the Innovation Lab, at 714-234-6349 or at suzy.engwall@ii4change.com.

To learn more about innovation at CHOC, click here.

 

Protect Infants from Next Wave of Pertussis

The California Immunization Coalition, along with Dr. Jasjit Singh, director, infection prevention and epidemiology at CHOC Children’s, recommend the following pertussis guidelines for pediatricians and their patients.

As pertussis increases to peak levels every 3- 5 years, California is due for its next epidemic by 2019. Young infants remain at highest risk of hospitalization and death from pertussis. Since 2010, at least 2,800 California infants younger than four months of age have contracted pertussis. Most of these infants have been hospitalized, and at least 18 have died.

Please consider the following measures to protect infants against pertussis:

Prevention

  • Prenatal Interview – Promote Prenatal Immunization! Remind parents and prenatal providers to give prenatal Tdap vaccine to women between 27 and 36 weeks of gestation of each pregnancy, regardless of vaccination history. Encourage vaccination of household and caregivers.
  • Administer the first dose of DTaP vaccine to infants promptly at 6-8 weeks of age. A dose as early as 6 weeks will help protect infants sooner if their mothers did not receive Tdap during pregnancy. Complete the DTaP series without delay.
  • Maternal immunization is associated with infant survival. Receipt of Tdap by mothers between weeks 27 and 36 of pregnancy and receipt of DTaP by infants prior to illness greatly reduce the risk of death from pertussis.

Presentation

Pertussis should be considered in any infant without a documented fever who presents with coryza, cough (especially paroxysmal), apnea, gagging, or post-tussive emesis.

Suspect pertussis in adolescents and adults with prolonged cough, and test and treat promptly to prevent transmission to infants.

Testing

Obtain nasopharyngeal swabs for pertussis PCR testing to confirm the diagnosis. Additional guidance is at www.cdc.gov/pertussis/clinical/diagnostic-testing/specimen-collection.html.

  • In infants, check white blood cell counts with differential – a leukemoid reaction is associated with life-threatening pertussis. A WBC count greater than 10,000 cells/mm3 with ˃50% lymphocytes should be repeated 24 hours later; increasing lymphocytosis should prompt additional monitoring and treatment. A WBC of >20,000 cells/mm3 with >50% lymphocytosis should be considered as a very strong indication that the infant has pertussis.

Treatment

Azithromycin (10mg/kg/day in a single dose for five days) for infants less than 6 months of age.

Empiric treatment is appropriate while awaiting the results of PCR testing.

Additional clinical guidance and access to consultation can be found at eziz.org/assets/docs/Pertussis-YoungInfants2011.pdf.

Further information, California case counts, and clinical guidance for pertussis can be found here.

 

CHOC Children’s Hosts Nutrition and Feeding Conference, Sept. 27-29

An upcoming conference hosted by CHOC Children’s will highlight the impact of diet on the human microbiome, food allergies, and neonatal and surgical nutrition, among other critical topics for infants and toddlers. We spoke to Caroline Steele, director, clinical nutrition and lactation services at CHOC Children’s about what participants can expect at this event:

Q: What is the importance of the “Nutrition and Feeding in Infants and Toddlers” conference?

A: Held on Sept. 27-29, at the Marriott Newport Beach Hotel & Spa in Newport Beach, the conference will give pediatricians, neonatologists, registered dietitians, registered nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, lactation consultants, speech pathologists, occupational therapists, and other pediatric healthcare providers a unique opportunity to receive advanced level education on infant and toddler nutrition.  Emphasis will be placed on the impact of diet on the human microbiome, feeding strategies, food allergies, human milk and formula handling within the healthcare setting, and optimizing care for the surgical infant.

Q: What excites you most about the conference?

A: I am excited about bringing together such an impressive slate of speakers from a variety of disciplines.  We have many nationally known speakers presenting their areas of expertise including Dr. Josef Neu, professor of pediatrics, division of neonatology at University of Florida Health, as our keynote speaker discussing the microbiome and having presentations from four of the authors from the definitive publication on handling of infant feedings within the hospital setting.  The opportunity for attendees from all over the country and from a variety of disciplines to network and share best practices is also going to be a highlight of this conference.

Q: What can attendees expect to learn about infant and toddler feeding?

A: Participants will take away specific tactics for setting up a new centralized human milk and formula preparation room or specific guidelines surrounding allergies from use of the elimination diet for breastfeeding to timing and content of complementary foods to reduce risk of allergies, to the management of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) and eosinophilic esophagitis.

Q: What other topic are you looking forward to at this conference?

A: I am looking forward to learning more about the physical and tactile aspects of eating such as what can be done from a pre-feeding standpoint for infants who will have a prolonged NPO status to help promote oral feeding when the time comes or how to prevent picky eating from developing into problem feeding.

Register and learn more about the Nutrition and Feeding in Infants and Toddlers conference.

CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital Celebrates 25 Years of Service to South Orange County Families

Today, we salute our outstanding physicians, nurses, associates and volunteers at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital for providing 25 years of compassionate, world-class care to South Orange County families.

Since its opening on July 15, 1993, CHOC Mission has nurtured, advanced and protected the health and well-being of children through its state-of-the-art facility and top-rated programs and services. As the only dedicated pediatric health care facility for families in south Orange County, the surrounding coastal areas and north San Diego County, CHOC Mission is a separately licensed 54-bed “hospital within a hospital” on the fifth floor of Mission Hospital.

Learn more about CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital.

 

U.S. News Ranks CHOC Among Nation’s Best Children’s Hospitals

CHOC Children’s has once again been named one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in its 2018-19 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings. CHOC ranked in six specialties: cancer, neonatology, neurology/neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology. Neonatology ranked in the “top 25,” list for its specialty, and urology in the “top 20.”

According to U.S. News, the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings were introduced in 2007 to help families of children with rare or life-threatening illnesses find the best medical care available. The rankings recognize the top 50 pediatric facilities across the United States in 10 pediatric specialties, from cancer to urology.

“This honor reflects CHOC Children’s steadfast commitment to the highest standards of patient care and safety,” says Dr. James Cappon, CHOC’s chief quality officer. “Recognition from U.S. News of our excellence in these subspecialties, including two on the top 25 lists, validates our efforts, but also provides our patients and families with even more assurance of our commitment to excelling in all areas of care.”

The U.S. News Best Children’s Hospitals rankings rely on clinical data and on an annual survey of pediatric specialists. The rankings’ methodology factors in patient outcomes, such as mortality, surgical success and infection rates, as well as available clinical resources and compliance with best practices.

“The U.S. News Best Children’s Hospitals highlight pediatric centers that deliver state-of-the-art medical care to children with complex conditions,” said Ben Harder, chief of health analysis at U.S. News. “Children with life-threatening or rare conditions need the level of quality care that these hospitals deliver day after day.”

Survival rates, adequacy of nurse staffing, procedure and patient volume, availability of programs for particular illnesses and conditions and more can be viewed at http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/pediatric-rankings.