CHOC-HOSTED PEDS 2040 CONFERENCE EXPLORES FUTURE PEDIATRIC TRENDS AND TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES

CHOC Children’s continues to lead the way in technology and artificial intelligence in the world of pediatric medicine, with the second annual “Pediatrics 2040: Trends and Innovations for the Next 25 Years.”  The conference was held in January at The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel, bringing together some of the brightest – and even youngest – minds in health care and technology from over 100 institutions worldwide, including Europe, Asia, Middle East and Africa.

Dr. Anthony Chang, Peds 2040 program chair and a keynote speaker, addresses the audience.
Dr. Anthony Chang, Peds 2040 program chair and a keynote speaker, addresses the audience.

Led by Dr. Anthony Chang, pediatric cardiologist and CHOC Children’s chief intelligence and innovation officer, the one-of-a-kind event explored emerging trends and future innovations with the objective to inspire and challenge attendees’ approach to care. Over 500 attendees   participated in presentations on genomic and precision medicine, regenerative medicine and 3D printing, pediatric nanomedicine, medical devices and connected health, robotics and robotic surgery, artificial intelligence and big data, and innovations in health care delivery.

Keynote speakers included Dr. Anthony Chang; Dr. Daniel Kraft, physician and scientist, Stanford Medical School; Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, pediatrician and executive director digital health, Seattle Children’s Hospital; Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, scientist and chairman and chief executive officer, NantWorks; and  Dr. Peter Szolovits, professor of computer science and engineering, MIT.

Innovation Beach,” one of the highlights of this year’s conference,

Roger Holzberg, founder of My Bridge 4 Life and Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, took third in the popular vote category of “Innovation Beach,” for the Infusionarium by Reimagine Well – an innovative video experience at CHOC Children’s Hospital offering a welcome distraction for young patients undergoing treatments that often last for hours.
Roger Holzberg, founder of My Bridge 4 Life and Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, took third in the popular vote category of “Innovation Beach,” for the Infusionarium by Reimagine Well – an innovative video experience at CHOC Children’s Hospital offering a welcome distraction for young patients undergoing treatments that often last for hours.

gave startup companies an opportunity to present their innovative health care products, ideas or solutions to a panel of judges. Innovations ranged from a hand-operated device that allows a medical provider to rapidly deliver a large volume of fluid through traditional IV access, to a humanoid robot used to interact with kids and help with pain management.  The popular vote winner went to young innovators, Jake Haygood and Hampton Woods, high school freshmen from Georgia and members of international Children Advocacy Network (iCAN), for their RFID (radio frequency identification) wrist band, which can be read by hospital personnel and uploaded to a medical charting system.​

​​​First place went to Glooko, a Silicon Valley-based company that wowed the audience with their mobile, cloud-based system which helps diabetes patients and their care providers manage their diabetes more efficiently, while helping to improve outcomes and reduce costs.

Kambria Sheridan, mother of two, leads a discussion on parents’ and patients’ perspectives. Her youngest son was born with a hypoplastic right heart, a butterfly vertebrae in his neck, microtia of his right ear as well as an underdeveloped right arm.
Kambria Sheridan, mother of two, leads a discussion on parents’ and patients’ perspective. Her youngest son was born with a hypoplastic right heart, a butterfly vertebrae in his neck, microtia of his right ear as well as an underdeveloped right arm.

Karishma Muthu, a 14-year-old intern from the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovations Institute at CHOC Children’s (MI3), stunned everyone when she won the best abstract in the artificial intelligence category. Other MI3 interns also participated by presenting their ideas and helping during the event.

This year’s conference also included patients and families who shared their stories, or showcased their own ideas or innovations. Through the “Young Innovators Workshop,” kids were introduced to innovation and worked in teams to learn the steps needed to turn an idea into a prototype. For many attendees, this was one of the most amazing aspects of the conference, and it will be continued going forward.

 Learn more about Peds 2040. 

To participate in the next Peds 2040 conference, email Dr. Anthony Chang at achang@choc.org.

 

CHOC Children’s Grand Rounds Video: Drug Reaction/Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) vs. Steven Johnson (SJS) vs. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN)

This CHOC Children’s grand rounds video, featuring Dr. Laura Pruitt, pediatric resident, PGY-3, provides an overview of the syndromes of DRESS, SJS and TEN to compare the similarities and highlight the differences of these distinct diseases. The presentation covers the common presenting symptoms, the underlying causes and current proposed treatments.

The goal of this presentation is to improve recognition of each of these syndromes by both general pediatricians and hospitalist physicians, allowing for earlier intervention and treatment.

View previous grand rounds videos.

CHOC Children’s Grand Rounds Video: Top Sports Nutritional Concerns Seen in an Adolescent Practice

In this CHOC Children’s grand rounds video, Dr. Chris Koutures, pediatrician and sports medicine specialist, addresses common nutritional concerns shared by pediatricians treating school-aged athletes, dancers and other performers.  Dr. Koutures’ goal is to empower pediatric providers to proactively identify at-risk patients and provide, with confidence, practical, food-based recommendations that will enhance the relationship between physician and patient.

“Too many times, I hear pediatric colleagues lament their lack of sports medicine knowledge.  After this talk, I think they will have greater confidence in using their already outstanding anticipatory guidance and general medical knowledge to address often unmet patient needs,” explains Dr. Koutures.

Information provided will be helpful for pre-participation and well-child visits, discussions after injuries and counseling patients who have been identified with anemia, dysmenorrhea/amenorrhea, fatigue, and underperformance. In addition to providing evidence-based case studies that address and/or counter sports nutrition myths, Dr. Koutures provides community and web-based resources.

Learn more about CHOC’s Sports Nutrition Program.

View previous grand rounds videos.

CHOC Children’s Begins NICU Expansion

To enhance its patient- and family-centered care experience and meet the growing demand for services, CHOC Children’s Hospital has launched an exp  ansion to its neonatal intensive care unit.

The build-out will create 36 private patient rooms with amenities to allow parents and guardians to comfortably stay overnight with their critically ill babies receiving highly specialized care at CHOC.

“Every parent wants to stay as close to their baby as possible, especially when the infant needs a high level of medical attention,” said Dr. Vijay Dhar, medical director of CHOC’s NICU. “The expansion to CHOC’s NICU will offer parents and guardians reassurance that they’ll be nearby while their baby receives the highest level of care. As an organization committed to patient- and family-centered care, CHOC is proud to soon offer private rooms to our smallest patients and their parents.”

CHOC NICU Patient Room

Expected to open in summer 2017, the new solo rooms on the fourth floor of the state-of-the-art Bill Holmes Tower will replace the current pod-style beds in CHOC’s Level 4 NICU. A potential second phase of construction could add more beds.

Private NICU rooms are setting a new standard for improved patient outcomes. A recent study published in the journal Pediatrics found that infants cared for in single-family rooms weighed more at discharge and gained weight more rapidly than those who received care in an open design. Also, they required fewer medical procedures, had increased attention, and experienced less stress, lethargy and pain. The researchers attributed these findings to increased maternal involvement.

Further, the private-room setting provides the space and privacy that parents need to be more intimately involved in the care of their baby, including breast-feeding and skin-to-skin contact, and parents can stay overnight with their child. In addition, private rooms give staff more access to and interaction with the family and patient.

CHOC’s expanded unit will also feature a multipurpose family room, sibling activity room, additional office space and other enhanced amenities.

CHOC NICU Main Waiting RoomA fundraising campaign by CHOC to raise $22 million is underway to complete the project. To that end, CHOC has received a $100,000 gift in support of the project from Ray Zadjmool and Nazy Fouladirad on behalf of Tevora, an Orange County information security consulting firm. A room in the unit will be named in honor of the gift.

“We are very happy to support CHOC in the work they do for our community, our neighbors, and our kids,” said Zadjmool, Tevora’s chief executive officer.

Other donors who have contributed to the project include the estate of Martha Sheff; the late Margaret Sprague; the estate of Ruth Miller; Credit Union for Kids; the Tinkerbell Guild;  Richard and Bobby Ann Stegemeier; Dr. Sherry Phelan & John H. Phelan, Jr.; Ashly and Brandon Howald; and the estate of Florence Jones.

CHOC NICU Corridor Nurse Alcove

For several decades, CHOC has served infants requiring the highest level of care. CHOC’s neonatal services currently offer 67 beds at CHOC Orange and the CHOC Children’s NICU at St. Joseph Hospital, 22 beds at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital, and a team of premier neonatologists who provide coverage at hospitals throughout Southern California.

A suite of specialized services comprises the CHOC NICU: the Surgical NICU, which provides dedicated care to babies needing or recovering from surgery; the Small Baby Unit, where infants with extremely low birth weights receive coordinated care; the Neurocritical NICU, where babies with neurological problems are cohorted; and the Cardiac NICU, which provides comprehensive care for neonates with congenital heart defects.

CHOC’s NICU was recently named one of the nation’s “top 25” by U.S. News & World Report, reflecting CHOC’s unwavering commitment to the highest standards of patient care and safety.

To learn more about the NICU expansion, visit http://www.choc.org/nicuinitiative.

CHOC Children’s Receives $500,000 Grant For Mental Health Initiative

CHOC Children’s recently received the first installment of a $500,000 capital grant in support of its mental health initiative from the Pacific Life Foundation. CHOC Children's Mental Health Inpatient Center

In honor of the gift, a cluster of six private patient rooms in the CHOC Children’s Mental Health Inpatient Center will be named after the Pacific Life Foundation, the charitable arm of Newport Beach-based insurance company Pacific Life.

“CHOC Children’s Hospital and the Pacific Life Foundation are longtime partners and it is an honor to provide CHOC with a substantial grant to support their efforts to care for those young patients and their families in Orange County struggling with mental illness,” said Tennyson Oyler, president of the Pacific Life Foundation.

The Center is the cornerstone of a transformational mental health initiative announced by CHOC and community leaders in May 2015. The initiative will ensure children, adolescents and young adults with mental illness get the health care services and support they currently lack in Orange County’s fragmented system of care.

The Center is specially designed for children ages 3 to 18 to receive care for mental health conditions. It will also provide specialty programming for children younger than 12.

Work is underway to extensively remodel the third floor of CHOC’s Research Building, located on the west side of the hospital’s main campus, to house 18 beds in a secure, healing environment, as well as an outdoor area for recreation. The Center is expected to open in early 2018.

Learn more about CHOC’s mental health initiative.