Drs. Nick Anas and Mitchell Katz Discuss Success of CHOC’s Clinical Leadership Council  

Dr. Nick Anas, CHOC’s pediatrician-in-chief, sat down with Dr. Mitchell Katz, director of CHOC’s Multidisciplinary Feeding Program and pediatric GI lab services, to talk about CHOC’s Clinical Leadership Council (CLC), and how it has benefited programs like the feeding program.

CHOC’s Multidisciplinary Feeding Program is one of a few specialty feeding programs in the country to offer comprehensive outpatient consultation and inpatient programs. With the support and success of CLC’s process, the feeding program has grown tremendously and increased the number of patients it can treat.

Watch this brief video to learn more about CLC and the feeding program.

Meet Dr. Andrew Mower

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Andrew Mower, a pediatric neurologist.

Dr.Andrew_Mower_0699_2

Q: What is your education and training?
A: I attended medical school at St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada, West Indies. My residency in pediatrics was at Maimonides Medical Center in New York.  My residency in child neurology was at State University of New York Downstate (SUNY Downstate) in New York. My fellowship in clinical neurophysiology was at Columbia University in New York.

Q: What are your administrative appointments?
A: Quality Improvement Committee since 2016; Ancillary and Diagnostic services since 2015.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?
A: Epilepsy and epilepsy surgery

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?
A: Two years

Q: What are some new programs or developments within your specialty?
A: Stereotactic EEG for epilepsy surgery

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?
A: Epilepsy and headaches

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you or your division at CHOC?
A: We take on the most challenging epilepsy cases to search for cures, and, if not, at least an improvement in the child and family’s quality of life. We work together as a team to use all of our expertise to help the child and family.

Q:  What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?
A: I feel that we offer families hope when hope had been abandoned before.

Q: Why did you decide to become a doctor?
A: I decided to become a doctor to help people in need. I chose neurology as my specialty because I had a fascination with the nervous system and wanted to break misperceptions that little can be done for patients with neurological problems.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?
A: Farmer. I love the accomplishment of creating a garden and growing produce.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?
A: Gardening, running and hiking

Q: What was the funniest thing a patient told you?
A: “I don’t eat apples, doctor.”

“Why?”

“Because they keep the doctor away, and I like you, Dr. Mower.”

Meet Dr. Jennifer Ho

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Jennifer Ho, a pediatric hospitalist.

Dr. Jennifer Ho

Q: What is your education and training?
A: UC Irvine School of Medicine, class of 2007. CHOC Children’s pediatric residency, class of 2010.

Q: What are your administrative appointments?
CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital Medical Staff Executive Committee member-at-large; member of the Medical Staff Performance Committee at CHOC at Mission.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?
Care of the hospitalized pediatric patient, infectious diseases, evidence-based medicine and optimization of the electronic health record.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?
A: Six years

Q: What are some new programs or developments within your specialty?
A: I am excited that the field of pediatric hospital medicine is growing and will soon be a nationally board-certified recognized specialty.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?
A: Asthma, bronchiolitis, dehydration and seizures

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you/your division at CHOC?
A: We now provide 24/7 attending coverage in the hospital at both CHOC Children’s Hospital and CHOC at Mission to ensure the highest quality of care for Orange County children. We pride ourselves on communication and are always available to help facilitate transition of care.

Q:  What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?
A: As a mother of two young children, it is very comforting to know that if they ever need medical care, CHOC provides the highest quality of care in a family-friendly environment.

Q: Why did you decide to become a doctor?

A: I decided to become a doctor when I was diagnosed with a heart problem in high school. I thought the human body was fascinating and I wanted to be able to help patients through their problems and get the most out of life.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?
A: I would own a used bookstore with an attached coffee shop and spend my days reading old books and drinking coffee.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?
A: Being a mommy to my two little kids, being outside, reading and playing volleyball.

Q: What was the funniest thing a patient told you?
A: From a 3-year-old girl: “I want to be a doctor like you … but only for unicorns and fairies.”

 

Meet Dr. Kenneth Kwon

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Kenneth Kwon, a pediatric emergency medicine specialist at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital.

Q: What is your education and training?
A:  I completed undergraduate studies at Cornell University, medical school at Columbia University, an internship at UCLA, a pediatric residency at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford University, and an emergency medicine residency at UC Irvine. I am board-certified in both pediatrics and emergency medicine.

Q: What are your administrative appointments?
A:  I am the Director of Pediatric Emergency Services and the current Chief of Staff elect at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?
A: Pediatric trauma and injury prevention.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?
A: Eleven years.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?
A: Fractures, head injuries, lacerations, febrile illnesses, and abdominal pain.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you/your division at CHOC?
A: We are a comprehensive general ED and trauma center with an emphasis on pediatric and family-centered care. We have pediatric-friendly facilities including a pediatric waiting area and child life services, and we have the resources of a children’s hospital in our building and at our fingertips.

Q:  What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?
A: CHOC is on the forefront regionally and nationally when it comes to patient safety and quality care, and that is not more evident than in the emergency department. I have worked in over ten emergency departments in my career, and I can safely say that the ED at CHOC at Mission is top-notch when it comes to timeliness and scope of care, facilities and staff.

Q: Why did you decide to become an emergency medicine physician?

A: During pediatric residency, I was particularly interested in high acuity care. I was deciding between neonatal/pediatric intensive care and pediatric emergency medicine. But I missed treating adults and the elderly, so I decided to pursue a second residency in emergency medicine. Now I get the best of both worlds, which is treating high acuity patients of all ages, with a particular emphasis on children.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?
A: I would have become a music producer. I’ve always loved music and even dabbled as a disc jockey in college. I was never good at singing or dancing.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?
A: Golf, family time, listening to obscure 80’s one-hit wonders, and sampling local microbrews.

Q: What was the funniest thing a patient told you?
A: An adage in pediatric emergency care is when a child comes in with a nosebleed, you don’t ask if he picks his nose, you ask him which finger he uses. When I asked this question to one of my pint-sized patients, he answered that he used all of them, and then proceeded to demonstrate by sticking each of his 10 fingers in his nose individually. It was priceless.

CHOC Children’s Honored as a National Leader in Driving Employee Engagement

CHOC Children’s was recently awarded The Advisory Board Company’s 2016 Workplace Transformation Award and the Workplace of the Year Award for its commitment to fostering and maintaining high levels of employee engagement. CHOC is the only organization to receive both awards.

“CHOC’s mission to nurture, advance and protect the health and well-being of children is accomplished through ongoing feedback from our employees. Engaged employees are more innovative, enthusiastic, productive and committed to provide the very best patient and family care. This critical feedback that CHOC leaders receive each year, drives our commitment to our employees to be the best place to work,” said Tom Capizzi, CHOC’s vice president, human resources.

Engaged employees, as defined by The Advisory Board Company – a leading health care, research and education performance improvement firm – are those who exhibit both loyalty and commitment to the organization. The award recognizes CHOC’s commitment to creating a best-in-class work environment for its employees.

“Our award winners have demonstrated an impressive ability to inspire an increasing level of engagement in their staff – among the largest transformations across the country,” said Steven Berkow, executive director, Survey Solutions at The Advisory Board Company.

CHOC was among five award recipients to receive the Workplace Transformation Award, and among 20 award recipients to receive the Workplace of the Year Award.