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Virtual pediatric lecture series: The scope of a fetal center

CHOC’s virtual pediatric lecture series continues with “The scope of a fetal center.”

This online discussion will be held Tuesday, June 8 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and is designed for general practitioners, family practitioners, obstetrician-gynecologists, perinatologists and other healthcare providers.

Dr. Jennifer Jolley, associate clinical professor of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at University of California, Irvine, will discuss several topics, including:

  • Recognizing indications for referral to a fetal center.
  • Augmenting patient care with a multidisciplinary approach to management of high-risk pregnancies.

This virtual lecture is part of a series provided by CHOC that aims to bring the latest, most relevant news to community providers. You can register here.

CHOC is accredited by the California Medical Association (CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians and has designated this live activity for a maximum of one AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Continuing Medical Education is also acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements, as long as the course is Category 1, and has been taken within the appropriate time frames.

Please contact CHOC Business Development at 714-509-4291 or BDINFO@choc.org with any questions.

CHOC surgeons thriving as productive researchers outside the operating room

CHOC surgeons are known for performing the latest procedures, no matter how complex, in areas including heart, trauma, gastrointestinal, urology and neurosurgery.

Outside the operating room, the seven physicians who make up CHOC’s pediatric general and thoracic surgery team also are excelling in another realm that is critical to CHOC’s mission of developing into one of the nation’s leading pediatric healthcare systems —

Research.

In the last five years, the surgery team has published some 35 papers, bolstered by recent new hires and a renewed commitment to dramatically transform CHOC from its roots as a community children’s hospital to an academic institution.

“It’s unprecedented in the history of pediatric surgery at CHOC – there’s no question about that,” pediatric surgeon Dr. Peter Yu says of the volume of research going on with his team.

“We are proud to be one of the most academically productive divisions at the hospital, and we have some impressive partners in other specialties here,” Dr. Yu says. He calls fellow pediatric surgeon Dr. Yigit S. Guner  the leader behind the recent flurry of research.

“The number of papers that we’ve published in the last several years would be something to be proud of at any children’s health system, even the ones that have a longstanding academic tradition,” Dr. Yu says.

Dr. Yu also cites two more recent hires as critical players: John Schomberg, PhD, a biostatistician in nursing administration and trauma, and Elizabeth Wallace, MPH, a clinical research coordinator in the trauma department in Research Administration.

Schomberg has been instrumental in the team’s research efforts, providing statistical expertise to help investigators, both experienced and new to research, formulate and refine their research questions, Wallace says.

“The research team’s accomplishments are due in large part to the progressive leadership of CHOC executives and the CHOC Research Institute for prioritizing research and providing support needed to make these research endeavors possible,” she adds.

“Though we rarely think of it when we’re waiting for our child to be seen by their physician, ultimately research is the foundation for providing our pediatric patients with leading, innovative and excellent care,” Wallace says. “This group’s research has potential to inform best practices, policy and advocacy that addresses the needs of our community and to advance pediatric care on a more global level. I’m excited to see what the future brings.”

Dr. Guner says conducting research is a central part of his effort to care for children. “We always strive to provide great care, but research raises the bar on what can be done to help our patients,” he says.

Three general areas

The research being conducted by doctors in CHOC’s pediatric general and thoracic surgery division falls into three general categories: general pediatric surgery, trauma and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), a critical care technology that can be used to bypass a failing heart or lungs.

One trauma study, expected to be submitted for publication in February 2021, looked at legal intervention — any injury sustained from an encounter with a law enforcement officer. While studies have been conducted in adults, none have focused on the pediatric population. Legal intervention as cause of traumatic injury in the pediatric trauma population is infrequent yet reported.

Schomberg, Wallace, Dr. Guner and Dr. Yu were among the researchers who examined the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) for health disparities related to legal intervention in the pediatric population.

The team’s key finding: Legal intervention in children disproportionately affects the African American population.

Of the 1,069,609 pediatric trauma patients identified in the NTDB, according to an abstract of their paper, 622 sustained injuries involving legal intervention. When these patients were compared to the general pediatric NTDB, they were more likely to be older, male and test positive for illegal drugs or alcohol.

They were more likely to be African American (44.37% vs 17%), Latino (22.82% vs 15.10%), or Native American (0.96% vs 0.94%).

Mortality was higher in trauma involving legal intervention than in the general pediatric trauma population (4.82% vs 1.11%,), particularly in African Americans (63.33% vs 36.66%). Understanding the issue can hopefully point to more effective strategies to minimize harm while protecting public safety.

Variety of research papers

Several of the pediatric general and thoracic surgery division’s research papers concern congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH), a rare birth defect in which a hole in the diaphragm allows the intestines, stomach, liver and other abdominal organs to enter the chest, impairing typical lung development.

In another research project in collaboration with St. Louis Children’s Hospital-Washington University and The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Dr. Yu looked at the incidence and length of stay for pediatric appendicitis during the initial days of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Yu is also currently working on a model to predict a rare traumatic injury referred to as blunt cerebrovascular injury (BCVI) and an interactive web app that would allow a trauma team to better understand their patient’s risk for BCVI.

Dr. Mustafa Kabeer, a CHOC pediatric surgeon, has published work in trauma and neonatology as well as basic science research on the stress response following splenectomy in mice. Dr. Kabeer’s most notable work includes research on the pioneering use of newborn umbilical cords to repair congenital birth defects such as gastroschisis.

Dr. David Gibbs, director of trauma services at CHOC, has been a staunch advocate for research, pushing CHOC to become the leading institution for pediatric trauma research in Orange County while pursuing a Pediatric Level 1 Trauma Center designation.

Dr. Gibbs’ published work includes developing prediction models in the trauma population to better understand prolonged hospital stays and return visits to the emergency department, revisiting the practice of X-rays post chest tube removal, and trauma case reports.

A true team effort

Dr. Yu  says the surgeons in his division work as a team on many research projects.

“Just like you can be a great surgeon,” he explains, “if you go in to operate and you don’t have any anesthesiologists or a nurse or a scrub tech to hand you instruments, there’s only so much that you can do by yourself.”

Dr. Guner says he enjoys understanding as much as possible about the diseases that he treats, and that research is an ideal vehicle to deepen that understanding.

“I really respect people who come here to work and take care of patients – it’s a vital service that people need,” he says. “In addition, I’ve always felt that I really wanted to know about the diseases themselves. Conducting research allows me to contribute to my field and to society at large.”

Another important aspect of research, Dr. Guner adds, is that it helps residents.

“Part of their training is more than taking care of patients,” Dr. Guner explains. “Learning and research go hand in hand. Research makes residents more motivated to work with their mentors and gives them something to do in the early stages of their career by increasing the energy they devote to academia.”

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Personalized medicine, surgical innovations advance pediatric brain tumor care

The Neuro-Oncology Treatment Program at the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC is doing more than providing the most advanced care for pediatric brain tumors — it’s also helping to shape the future of personalized medicine and surgical innovations.

CHOC offers a full range of standard treatments for brain tumors, as well as personalized therapies for many tumor types, such as medulloblastomas, based on genetic subtyping. Experimental treatments are available through Children’s Oncology Group and other consortium and industry-driven clinical trials. Some of these studies — including a trial developed by a CHOC neuro-oncologist to investigate a vaccine for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma — are part of CHOC’s robust early-phase clinical trials program, according to Dr. Chenue Abongwa, pediatric neuro-oncologist at CHOC.

Dr. Chenue Abongwa
Dr. Chenue Abongwa, pediatric neuro-oncologist at CHOC

CHOC also partners with some of the country’s foremost healthcare institutions, including Mayo Clinic, to apply the latest genomic sequencing and molecular studies in studying each individual tumor.

When a patient presents with a brain tumor, a wide range of specialists are involved from the beginning. “We have a multidisciplinary neuro-oncology tumor board that includes neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists and a neuro-oncologist, and we involve other specialists as needed,” says Dr. Abongwa. “This expertise allows us to select the treatment likely to be the best option for each child while minimizing the risk of side effects.”

Each patient at CHOC is treated via an individualized, precision medicine approach. When surgery is necessary, CHOC has four highly experienced, board-certified pediatric neurosurgeons who can apply some of the most advanced surgical capabilities. “We have the latest in surgical navigation, and we partner with neurologists at CHOC to offer surgical neuromonitoring to track certain nerve potentials during resections,” says Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery at CHOC and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute. “If we’re operating near the brain stem, it’s important to know if there’s potential for damage in surrounding structures.”

Dr. Suresh Magge
Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery at CHOC and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute

Several of the surgical therapies CHOC offers are minimally invasive alternatives to craniotomy. One example is endoscopic surgery, which may be appropriate for tumors located in the ventricles. Neurosurgeons can visualize and resect these tumors using an endoscope inserted through a small incision.

“Certain tumors, especially those located deep in the brain, are amenable to laser interstitial thermal therapy (laser ablation),” Dr. Magge says. “This has revolutionized the treatment of certain types of lesions. We can insert a catheter through a small incision down to the deep part of the brain and ablate the tumor without harming surrounding structures. A ROSA™ (robotic stereotactic assistance) robot allows us to insert the laser with a high degree of precision. Patients experience minimal blood loss and typically go home within a day.”

Once treatment concludes, patients ultimately enter the Neuro-Oncology Treatment Program’s longstanding late effects program. This multidisciplinary program provides long-term follow-up of patients and connects them with specialists who can treat endocrine, neurocognitive, psychosocial and other side effects of treatment.

“For some tumors, such as medulloblastomas, we’ve reached the point where we’re achieving good rates of cure, as high as 80% or more,” Dr. Abongwa says. “So now we’re focused on minimizing the long-term effects of treatment. Most institutions don’t have a strong, long-term follow-up program for pediatric patients. Over time, our program has become quite robust and multidisciplinary. That’s another area of benefit that we offer our patients. We’re a child- and family-focused institution. That focus is evident in all the programs and services that are available to our patients.”

Our Care and Commitment to Children Has Been Recognized

CHOC Hospital was named one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in its 2020-21 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings and ranked in the cancer specialty.

Learn how CHOC’s pediatric oncology treatments, expertise and support programs preserve childhood for children in Orange County, Calif., and beyond.

Virtual Pediatric Lecture Series: Pediatric Orthopaedics

CHOC’s virtual pediatric lecture series continues with “Pediatric orthopaedics: Buckle fractures, osteosarcoma and some things in between.”

This online discussion will be held Thursday, Feb. 25 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and is designed for general practitioners, family practitioners and other healthcare providers.

Dr. Amir Misaghi, pediatric orthopaedic surgeon with the CHOC Orthopaedic Institute, will discuss several topics, including:

  • How to diagnose and manage basic pediatric fractures in the primary care clinic
  • Identifying fractures and injuries that require further workup and referral
  • Initiating early evaluation for benign and malignant bone tumors
  • Implementing appropriate referrals
Dr. Amir Misaghi, pediatric orthopaedic surgeon with the CHOC Orthopaedic Institute

This virtual lecture is part of a series provided by CHOC that aims to bring the latest, most relevant news to community providers. You can register here.

CHOC is accredited by the California Medical Association (CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians and has designated this live activity for a maximum of one AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Continuing Medical Education is also acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements, as long as the course is Category 1, and has been taken within the appropriate time frames.

Please contact CHOC Business Development at 714-509-4291 or BDINFO@choc.org with any questions.