CHOC Experts Provide High Level of Care for Brachial Plexus Surgery

CHOC Children’s offers the highest level of care for children requiring brachial plexus surgery.

Brachial plexus surgery is a complex procedure that repairs damage to the bundle of connected nerves in the neck region. Damage to these nerves is often caused by birth complications, contact sport collisions and automobile accidents. A severe brachial plexus injury can cause a patient to lose function and sensation in their arm, impairing their ability to perform everyday tasks.

Surgical procedures such as nerve grafts and transfers can restore this function and sensation and help the patient regain their lost quality of life.

“While many patients will regain movement with therapy alone, a small percentage will require nerve surgery,” says Dr. Joffre Olaya, pediatric neurosurgeon at CHOC. “Patients may even need a series of surgeries,” he adds. “The first surgery may be focused on the nerves, where the second would be focused on the transfer of muscle or movement of bones.”

The experienced multidisciplinary team at CHOC is fully equipped to handle all aspects of the repair and guide the patient and their family through every stage of treatment and healing. The surgery is performed in the Tidwell Procedure Center at CHOC, which features seven operating rooms and advanced technology and information systems.

“We like to evaluate patients as early as possible,” says Dr. Amber Leis, a CHOC and UC Irvine plastic surgeon. “We want to be part of the child’s journey and provide long-term care to ensure the best possible outcome.”

Whether or not these patients end up requiring surgery, they all benefit from therapy, explains Dr. Leis. CHOC is proud to offer the latest, research-based physical therapy in one of the most comprehensive rehabilitation centers in the area. Further, depending on their age, diagnosis and treatment plan, some brachial plexus patients may benefit from aquatic physical therapy, which takes place in the center’s pool.

Dr. Olaya and Dr. Leis are committed to building a robust, one-of-a-kind brachial plexus program for children in the region and beyond.

They offer community physicians the following guidelines on when to refer:

  • As early as possible, after a brachial plexus birth palsy with impaired arm movement.
  • After a sports or motor vehicle accident with impaired arm movement or sensation.

Learn more about surgical services at CHOC.