Meet Dr. Gary Goodman

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians and patients to get to know its specialists.  Today, meet Dr. Gary Goodman, a pediatric critical care medicine specialist and medical director of the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital. After graduating from medical school at University of California, Irvine, he served his internship, residency and chief residency training in pediatrics at UC Davis Medical Center.  Dr. Goodman completed a pediatric critical care and pulmonary medicine fellowship at CHOC.

Dr. Gary Goodman

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: I am particularly interested in traumatic brain injury, concussions, respiratory failure and shock.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?

A: I have been on staff for 30 years.

Q: Are there any new programs within your specialty at CHOC you’d like to share?

A: We are now utilizing noninvasive ventilation and physiologic monitoring.  We have developed improved treatment of ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome).  We are also proud of our neuro-critical care team.

Q: What would you most like community/referring physicians to know about your division at CHOC?

A: The division of pediatric critical care provides outstanding and personalized care for children and their families when their need is the highest. We strive to not only provide state-of-the-art medical care, but to also support the emotional needs of the patient and family. Our comprehensive, multi-disciplinary team works together to address every need and concern a patient and family might have.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered at CHOC?

A: For a pediatric specialist, there is no higher honor and privilege than working at a hospital dedicated to caring for children. I am always surrounded by and supported by other practitioners who share my passion for caring for children and who are all pediatric specialists themselves.

Q: When did you decide you wanted to be a doctor?

A: I wanted to be a doctor since I was 5 years old, inspired by black and white documentaries about medicine.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A: If I wasn’t a physician, I would be an architect. I am fascinated by design and how the environment we live and work in can have such positive and even healing effects on us.

Q: What are you hobbies and interests outside of medicine?

A: I enjoy listening to music (jazz and classical), cooking, photography, collecting watches and traveling.

Q: What was the funniest interaction you had with a patient?

A: Just recently, I had a patient, who has a mild developmental delay, call me “the boy.”  I would stop in the patient’s room each morning, at which point I’d get asked, “What do YOU want?”

Meet Dr. Amy Harrison

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Amy Harrison, a pediatric pulmonologist.

Amy Harrison, M.D.
Amy Harrison, M.D.

 

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I attended Indiana University School of Medicine. I completed both my pediatrics residency and fellowship in pediatric pulmonology at the University of Minnesota Children’s Hospital.

Q: What are your administrative appointments?

A: I am the co-director of CHOC’s Cystic Fibrosis Center.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A:  Cystic fibrosis (CF), muscle weakness (muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy), asthma and general pulmonary health, chronic disease.

Q: Are you working on any current research?

A: Our CF program was awarded the CF Fundamentals Learning and Leadership Collaborative in June 2015, which has allowed us to improve our CF care processes and clinical outcomes for people with cystic fibrosis.  We are currently studying ways to improve our patients’ knowledge of, and adherence to, prescribed pulmonary therapies.

 Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?

A: 5 years.

Q: Are there any new programs or developments within your specialty?

A:  Our CF program was awarded a mental health grant through the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation to develop and implement a depression and anxiety screening program for patients with CF and their caregivers. Funds will enable the team to expand its social worker’s availability and have a designated psychologist to help patients and caregivers. They will provide screenings, evidence-based guidelines and follow-up care for depression and anxiety, as well as develop a community referral network of mental health providers. CHOC’s CF model, if successful, could be replicated in other specialty clinics.

In addition, we are excited to offer many cutting-edge therapies for CF patients including Orkambi and Kalydeco, medications that help the defective protein in CF function more normally, thus treating the underlying cause of CF.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: I see patients with a range of conditions, including asthma, chronic cough, recurrent pneumonia, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you/your division at CHOC?

A: The pulmonary division at CHOC offers comprehensive care for all patients with lung disease and sleep disorders from extensive lung function testing to sleep studies and diagnostic procedures such as bronchoscopy. We also have comprehensive services for patients with sleep apnea, sleep breathing disorders including apnea monitors and BIPAP data analysis for clinical management. In addition, we also offer services in Huntington Beach, Mission Viejo, Corona and Pomona Valley.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?  

A: I enjoy caring for children with chronic conditions and helping them to find ways of living normal fulfilling lives.  I take great pride in my patient’s accomplishments and find their stories inspiring.  I most enjoy creating a true partnership with my patients and their families to find ways to improve their care.

 Q: Why did you decide to become a pediatric pulmonologist?

A: I was always interested in science from a very young age and pursued a medical education due to my own fascination with learning more about how our bodies work.  During my training, I developed asthma myself and found my strong relationships with my own medical professionals enormously helpful in empowering me to deal with a chronic disease.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?  

A: I would probably set up my own Etsy shop and sell things I create! I often make homemade gifts for friends and family members for birthdays and holidays.  I also love to travel and exposing my children to new cultures.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: I love spending time with my family and my three children, ages 2, 6 and 10.  In addition, I enjoy reading, visiting museums and traveling.

Q: What have you learned from your patients?

A:  I am continuously amazed by how strong and resilient my patients can be. I learn so much from them, and I have now had three patients tell me they were inspired to pursue a career in medicine because of our relationship and their disease.

 

U.S. News Ranks CHOC Among Nation’s Best Children’s Hospitals

U.S. News & World Report has named CHOC Children’s one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals in the 2016-17 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings. CHOC ranked in eight specialties: cancer, neonatology, neurology/neurosurgery, pulmonology, orthopedics, gastroenterology and GI surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, and urology, which earned a “top 25” spot on the coveted list.

According to U.S. News, the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are intended to help parents determine where to get the best medical care for their children. The rankings highlight the top 50 U.S. pediatric facilities in 10 specialties, from cancer to urology. Of the 183 pediatric medical centers participating in the survey, only 78 hospitals ranked in at least one specialty.

“The Best Children’s Hospitals highlight pediatric centers that offer exceptional care for the kids who need the most help,” said U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow. “Day in and day out, they deliver state-of-the-art medical care.”

For its annual list, U.S. News relies on extensive clinical and operational data, and on an annual survey of pediatric specialists. Survival rates, adequacy of nurse staffing, procedure volume and much more can be viewed on http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/pediatric-rankings .

In addition to being honored by U.S. News, CHOC has been distinguished, multiple times, as a Leapfrog Top Hospital for demonstrating excellence in hospital safety and quality.

Additional accolades highlighting CHOC’s commitment to the highest standards of care and performance include the gold-level CAPE Award from the California Council of Excellence, a honor for which CHOC was the only children’s hospital recognized in the state; Magnet distinction for nursing excellence; gold-level Beacon Award for Excellence, a distinction earned twice by CHOC’s pediatric intensive care unit team; a 2015 “Most Wired Hospital”; and The Advisory Board Company’s 2016 Workplace Transformation Award and the Workplace of the Year Award. Inspiring the best in her team, CHOC’s President and CEO Kimberly Chavalas Cripe was named a winner of the EY Entrepreneur of The Year® 2015 Award in the “Community Contributions” category for Orange County and Inland Empire.

CHOC PICU Honored for Exceptional Patient Care

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) recently conferred a gold-level Beacon Award for Excellence on the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at CHOC Children’s Hospital. This is the second time CHOC has earned the gold-level distinction.b logo-edit yr 09-10 1fThe Beacon Award for Excellence— honoring exceptional patient care and healthy work environments—recognizes PICU caregivers who successfully improve patient outcomes and align practices with AACN’s six Healthy Work Environment Standards. Units that achieve this three-year, three-level award with gold, silver or bronze designations meet national criteria consistent with Magnet Recognition, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the National Quality Healthcare Award.

Beacon Award logo

Beacon logo“The Beacon Award for Excellence recognizes caregivers in stellar units whose consistent and systematic approach to evidence-based care optimizes patient outcomes. Units that receive this national recognition serve as role models to others on their journey to excellent patient and family care,” explains AACN President Karen McQuillan, RN, MS, CNS-BC, CCRN, CNRN, FAAN.

CHOC’s PICU earned a gold award by meeting the following evidence-based Beacon Award for Excellence criteria:

  • Leadership structures and systems
  • Appropriate staffing and staff engagement
  • Effective communication, knowledge management, learning and development
  • Evidence-based practice and processes
  • Outcome measurement

About the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses: Founded in 1969, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world. AACN joins together the interests of more than 500,000 acute and critical care nurses, and claims more than 235 chapters worldwide. The organization’s vision is to create a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and their families in which acute and critical care nurses make their optimal contribution.

Drs. Nick Anas and Mitchell Katz Discuss Success of CHOC’s Clinical Leadership Council  

Dr. Nick Anas, CHOC’s pediatrician-in-chief, sat down with Dr. Mitchell Katz, director of CHOC’s Multidisciplinary Feeding Program and pediatric GI lab services, to talk about CHOC’s Clinical Leadership Council (CLC), and how it has benefited programs like the feeding program.

CHOC’s Multidisciplinary Feeding Program is one of a few specialty feeding programs in the country to offer comprehensive outpatient consultation and inpatient programs. With the support and success of CLC’s process, the feeding program has grown tremendously and increased the number of patients it can treat.

Watch this brief video to learn more about CLC and the feeding program.