CHOC to Host Conference on Growth and Growth Disorders

Criteria for evaluating and treating a short statured child, and theDr. Amrit Bhangoo
ability to understand growth hormone resistance and treatment with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are among the topics featured at an upcoming CHOC Children’s conference. We spoke with Dr. Amrit Bhangoo, pediatric endocrinologist, about what guests can expect on March 19.

Q: What is the importance of the “Growth and Growth Disorders in Children” conference?

A: This conference will give pediatricians, family medicine physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and other pediatric health care providers a unique opportunity to learn about short stature. CHOC’s endocrine team will share our experiences working with pediatric patients with short stature, both from the primary care providers’ role and the endocrine specialists’ role.  In addition, we will discuss treatment of patients with growth hormone (GH) therapy.

 Q: What excites you most about the conference?

A: It is exciting to be able to bring together such a diverse group of specialists with a focus to educate and share their expertise with the community. Most of the speakers at the conference are faculty members at CHOC and UC Irvine. Further, this forum provides an opportunity for community providers to interact with the endocrinologists on a more intimate level. They will be able to ask members of the endocrine team questions and learn from the clinical scenarios presented during panel discussions.

Q: What is growth hormone deficiency (GHD) and what would you like attendees to take away from your presentation?

A: Growth hormone deficiency causes severe short stature in children. It is due to deficiency of growth hormone production or secretion from the pituitary gland. Prevalence is about 1 in 1,000, and it can present with multiple pituitary hormonal deficiencies and mid-line facial defects. The presentations in the conference will extensively review this condition. Additionally, we will discuss a diagnosis of precocious puberty.

Q: What is the latest technology tied to GHD?

A: Technology is rapidly evolving in the treatment of GHD.  Currently the only way to treat a child with GHD is to give GH injections on a daily basis, which has limitations for long-term compliance and successful outcomes.  Most of the newer therapies are centered on the development of long acting GH analogs that may act to eliminate the need for daily dosing. New therapies are currently being developed and are under the FDA review process.

 Q: Is CHOC endocrinology involved in other upcoming GHD-related presentations, research or special projects?

A: We are involved in several studies at CHOC that are evaluating the use of growth hormone in the pediatric population. Specifically we are involved in the Novo Nordisk registry to follow up and monitor the acute and long-term side effects of GH therapy.  We are also just beginning a new study with Genentech/Roche, a Phase 4 open label study on the use of GH therapy in pediatric patients with GH deficiency.

In addition to our research endeavors, we also provide monthly community education at our Orange campus through a growth lecture for those families who have been referred to us.  This lecture provides a basic overview on topics surrounding normal growth from birth to adult, the evaluation of a child with short stature, and treatment options for pediatric patients.

 Q: When should a pediatrician refer a patient to an endocrinologist regarding a growth disorder?

A: Referral guidelines are available to our community physicians (pages 11-14) at:  http://www.choc.org/wp/wp-content/uploads/referrals/Endocrinology-Referral-Guidelines.pdf

The “Growth and Growth Disorders in Children” conference will be held on March 19, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at CHOC Children’s Hospital, in the Harold Wade Education Center.

Learn more and register here

 

How to Manage Your Professional Online Reputation

Today’s physicians are practicing medicine in an era of transparency, where information for consumers is a mouse click away.  Approximately seven out of 10 Internet users are accessing health-related information online, including researching physicians.  If you haven’t googled yourself, you’re missing out on learning what your patients and their families are finding out about you — accurate or not.  Being smart about social media and other digital platforms places you in charge of your online reputation.  Below are a few tips to help you.

  • Google yourself using different variations of your name, e.g.: John Smith, MD, Dr. Jonathan Smith, John K. Smith, MD.  Your search will likely reveal listings on third-party rating or review sites. There are roughly 50 or more of these sites, which pull information from licensing databases and other public sources, including the National Physician Index.  Information may be incorrect or outdated.  To correct information, you must claim the listings.  Specifics for doing so differ among sites, as do methods of authentication.  Before you proceed down this path, note the process can be tedious.
  • Create a professional profile on Linkedin. These profiles tend to show high in search results, enhanced by frequent updates, including sharing appropriate professional content.
  • Claim your Doxmity profile. The site feeds the US News “Find a Doctor” directory, and its members are invited participants in the “Best Hospitals’” reputation survey. Note the site’s membership is limited to physicians.  CHOC’s marketing and communications department can send you instructions for claiming and/or updating your profile.
  • Partner with CHOC’s marketing and communications department to update your physician profile on choc.org. These profiles come up high in searches for individual physicians, even more so for physicians with updated, comprehensive bios.   Additionally, work with the department to create and distribute useful content:  blog posts, podcasts, news articles, infographics, presentations, etc.  This digital content can help push the public listings and/or other irrelevant, erroneous content further in the search rankings, possibly never to be seen by the majority of searchers.
  • Encourage, when appropriate, patients and families to share positive reviews and engage with CHOC on CHOC’s social media

Patients and their families are often getting to know their physicians online before meeting them in their offices.  Take control of that first digital impression.

CHOC-hosted Peds 2040 Conference Explores Future Pediatric Trends and Technological Advances

CHOC Children’s continues to lead the way in technology and artificial intelligence in the world of pediatric medicine, with the second annual “Pediatrics 2040: Trends and Innovations for the Next 25 Years.”  The conference was held in January at The Ritz-Carlton, Laguna Niguel, bringing together some of the brightest – and even youngest – minds in health care and technology from over 100 institutions worldwide, including Europe, Asia, Middle East and Africa.

Dr. Anthony Chang, Peds 2040 program chair and a keynote speaker, addresses the audience.
Dr. Anthony Chang, Peds 2040 program chair and a keynote speaker, addresses the audience.

Led by Dr. Anthony Chang, pediatric cardiologist and CHOC Children’s chief intelligence and innovation officer, the one-of-a-kind event explored emerging trends and future innovations with the objective to inspire and challenge attendees’ approach to care. Over 500 attendees   participated in presentations on genomic and precision medicine, regenerative medicine and 3D printing, pediatric nanomedicine, medical devices and connected health, robotics and robotic surgery, artificial intelligence and big data, and innovations in health care delivery.

Keynote speakers included Dr. Anthony Chang; Dr. Daniel Kraft, physician and scientist, Stanford Medical School; Dr. Wendy Sue Swanson, pediatrician and executive director digital health, Seattle Children’s Hospital; Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong, scientist and chairman and chief executive officer, NantWorks; and  Dr. Peter Szolovits, professor of computer science and engineering, MIT.

Innovation Beach,” one of the highlights of this year’s conference,

Roger Holzberg, founder of My Bridge 4 Life and Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, took third in the popular vote category of “Innovation Beach,” for the Infusionarium by Reimagine Well – an innovative video experience at CHOC Children’s Hospital offering a welcome distraction for young patients undergoing treatments that often last for hours.
Roger Holzberg, founder of My Bridge 4 Life and Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, took third in the popular vote category of “Innovation Beach,” for the Infusionarium by Reimagine Well – an innovative video experience at CHOC Children’s Hospital offering a welcome distraction for young patients undergoing treatments that often last for hours.

gave startup companies an opportunity to present their innovative health care products, ideas or solutions to a panel of judges. Innovations ranged from a hand-operated device that allows a medical provider to rapidly deliver a large volume of fluid through traditional IV access, to a humanoid robot used to interact with kids and help with pain management.  The popular vote winner went to young innovators, Jake Haygood and Hampton Woods, high school freshmen from Georgia and members of international Children Advocacy Network (iCAN), for their RFID (radio frequency identification) wrist band, which can be read by hospital personnel and uploaded to a medical charting system.

First place went to Glooko, a Silicon Valley-based company that wowed the audience with their mobile, cloud-based system which helps diabetes patients and their care providers manage their diabetes more efficiently, while helping to improve outcomes and reduce costs.

Kambria Sheridan, mother of two, leads a discussion on parents’ and patients’ perspectives. Her youngest son was born with a hypoplastic right heart, a butterfly vertebrae in his neck, microtia of his right ear as well as an underdeveloped right arm.
Kambria Sheridan, mother of two, leads a discussion on parents’ and patients’ perspective. Her youngest son was born with a hypoplastic right heart, a butterfly vertebrae in his neck, microtia of his right ear as well as an underdeveloped right arm.

Karishma Muthu, a 14-year-old intern from the Sharon Disney Lund Medical Intelligence and Innovations Institute at CHOC Children’s (MI3), stunned everyone when she won the best abstract in the artificial intelligence category. Other MI3 interns also participated by presenting their ideas and helping during the event.

This year’s conference also included patients and families who shared their stories, or showcased their own ideas or innovations. Through the “Young Innovators Workshop,” kids were introduced to innovation and worked in teams to learn the steps needed to turn an idea into a prototype. For many attendees, this was one of the most amazing aspects of the conference, and it will be continued going forward.

 Learn more about Peds 2040. 

To participate in the next Peds 2040 conference, email Dr. Anthony Chang at achang@choc.org.

 

CHOC Children’s Grand Rounds Video: Drug Reaction/Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms (DRESS) vs. Steven Johnson (SJS) vs. Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis (TEN)

This CHOC Children’s grand rounds video, featuring Dr. Laura Pruitt, pediatric resident, PGY-3, provides an overview of the syndromes of DRESS, SJS and TEN to compare the similarities and highlight the differences of these distinct diseases. The presentation covers the common presenting symptoms, the underlying causes and current proposed treatments.

The goal of this presentation is to improve recognition of each of these syndromes by both general pediatricians and hospitalist physicians, allowing for earlier intervention and treatment.

View previous grand rounds videos.

CHOC Children’s Grand Rounds Video: Top Sports Nutritional Concerns Seen in an Adolescent Practice

In this CHOC Children’s grand rounds video, Dr. Chris Koutures, pediatrician and sports medicine specialist, addresses common nutritional concerns shared by pediatricians treating school-aged athletes, dancers and other performers.  Dr. Koutures’ goal is to empower pediatric providers to proactively identify at-risk patients and provide, with confidence, practical, food-based recommendations that will enhance the relationship between physician and patient.

“Too many times, I hear pediatric colleagues lament their lack of sports medicine knowledge.  After this talk, I think they will have greater confidence in using their already outstanding anticipatory guidance and general medical knowledge to address often unmet patient needs,” explains Dr. Koutures.

Information provided will be helpful for pre-participation and well-child visits, discussions after injuries and counseling patients who have been identified with anemia, dysmenorrhea/amenorrhea, fatigue, and underperformance. In addition to providing evidence-based case studies that address and/or counter sports nutrition myths, Dr. Koutures provides community and web-based resources.

Learn more about CHOC’s Sports Nutrition Program.

View previous grand rounds videos.