CHOC Children’s Hosts Nutrition and Feeding Conference, Sept. 27-29

An upcoming conference hosted by CHOC Children’s will highlight the impact of diet on the human microbiome, food allergies, and neonatal and surgical nutrition, among other critical topics for infants and toddlers. We spoke to Caroline Steele, director, clinical nutrition and lactation services at CHOC Children’s about what participants can expect at this event:

Q: What is the importance of the “Nutrition and Feeding in Infants and Toddlers” conference?

A: Held on Sept. 27-29, at the Marriott Newport Beach Hotel & Spa in Newport Beach, the conference will give pediatricians, neonatologists, registered dietitians, registered nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, lactation consultants, speech pathologists, occupational therapists, and other pediatric healthcare providers a unique opportunity to receive advanced level education on infant and toddler nutrition.  Emphasis will be placed on the impact of diet on the human microbiome, feeding strategies, food allergies, human milk and formula handling within the healthcare setting, and optimizing care for the surgical infant.

Q: What excites you most about the conference?

A: I am excited about bringing together such an impressive slate of speakers from a variety of disciplines.  We have many nationally known speakers presenting their areas of expertise including Dr. Josef Neu, professor of pediatrics, division of neonatology at University of Florida Health, as our keynote speaker discussing the microbiome and having presentations from four of the authors from the definitive publication on handling of infant feedings within the hospital setting.  The opportunity for attendees from all over the country and from a variety of disciplines to network and share best practices is also going to be a highlight of this conference.

Q: What can attendees expect to learn about infant and toddler feeding?

A: Participants will take away specific tactics for setting up a new centralized human milk and formula preparation room or specific guidelines surrounding allergies from use of the elimination diet for breastfeeding to timing and content of complementary foods to reduce risk of allergies, to the management of food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome (FPIES) and eosinophilic esophagitis.

Q: What other topic are you looking forward to at this conference?

A: I am looking forward to learning more about the physical and tactile aspects of eating such as what can be done from a pre-feeding standpoint for infants who will have a prolonged NPO status to help promote oral feeding when the time comes or how to prevent picky eating from developing into problem feeding.

Register and learn more about the Nutrition and Feeding in Infants and Toddlers conference.

CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital Celebrates 25 Years of Service to South Orange County Families

Today, we salute our outstanding physicians, nurses, associates and volunteers at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital for providing 25 years of compassionate, world-class care to South Orange County families.

Since its opening on July 15, 1993, CHOC Mission has nurtured, advanced and protected the health and well-being of children through its state-of-the-art facility and top-rated programs and services. As the only dedicated pediatric health care facility for families in south Orange County, the surrounding coastal areas and north San Diego County, CHOC Mission is a separately licensed 54-bed “hospital within a hospital” on the fifth floor of Mission Hospital.

Learn more about CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital.

 

U.S. News Ranks CHOC Among Nation’s Best Children’s Hospitals

CHOC Children’s has once again been named one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in its 2018-19 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings. CHOC ranked in six specialties: cancer, neonatology, neurology/neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology and urology. Neonatology ranked in the “top 25,” list for its specialty, and urology in the “top 20.”

According to U.S. News, the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings were introduced in 2007 to help families of children with rare or life-threatening illnesses find the best medical care available. The rankings recognize the top 50 pediatric facilities across the United States in 10 pediatric specialties, from cancer to urology.

“This honor reflects CHOC Children’s steadfast commitment to the highest standards of patient care and safety,” says Dr. James Cappon, CHOC’s chief quality officer. “Recognition from U.S. News of our excellence in these subspecialties, including two on the top 25 lists, validates our efforts, but also provides our patients and families with even more assurance of our commitment to excelling in all areas of care.”

The U.S. News Best Children’s Hospitals rankings rely on clinical data and on an annual survey of pediatric specialists. The rankings’ methodology factors in patient outcomes, such as mortality, surgical success and infection rates, as well as available clinical resources and compliance with best practices.

“The U.S. News Best Children’s Hospitals highlight pediatric centers that deliver state-of-the-art medical care to children with complex conditions,” said Ben Harder, chief of health analysis at U.S. News. “Children with life-threatening or rare conditions need the level of quality care that these hospitals deliver day after day.”

Survival rates, adequacy of nurse staffing, procedure and patient volume, availability of programs for particular illnesses and conditions and more can be viewed at http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/pediatric-rankings.

CHOC Experts to Speak at International Hydrocephalus Conference

Two CHOC Children’s pediatric neurology experts will speak at an upcoming conference featuring the latest education on hydrocephalus.

Including internationally recognized medical professionals and researchers, HA Connect – National Conference on Hydrocephalus, held June 28-30 in Newport Beach, will address the medical, educational and social complexities of living with hydrocephalus through interactive discussions, workshops and hands-on exhibits.  Over 500 people are expected to attend the international conference.

Dr. Michael Muhonen

Dr. Michael Muhonen, board-certified neurosurgeon, division chief of neurosurgery and medical director, CHOC Neuroscience Institute, will present a lecture on the anatomy of the brain, with a focus on the cerebral ventricles, cerebral spinal fluid physiology and hydrocephalus.

On the second day of the conference, Dr. Muhonen and Dr. Anjalee Galion, board-certified pediatric neurologist and associate director of the CHOC Sleep Lab, will present on headaches and current management. Their lectures will be specifically focused on the etilogy and treatment of headaches in patients with hydrocephalus, pseudotumor cerebrii, and other brain pathology.

Dr. Anjalee Galion

All CHOC professionals and employees are invited to attend.  The CHOC Neuroscience Institute is offering assistance with the cost of registration. For details, email Rhonda Long, director, CHOC Neuroscience Institute at rlong@choc.org.

Learn more about HA Connect – 2018 National Conference on Hydrocephalus.

CHOC Resident Follows in His Father’s Footsteps

Growing up, Tim Hicks fondly remembers seeing his dad come home from work with a smile. Despite his demanding job as physician, his dad, David, always remained positive and shared countless rewarding stories that he witnessed at the hospital.

It was that unwavering dedication that inspired Tim, now a second-year pediatric resident at CHOC Children’s and UC Irvine, to pursue a career in medicine.

“Seeing how happy my dad has been, I wanted to be part of that,” he says.

As long as he can remember, Tim was interested in medicine. He was a curious child and enjoyed science and studying about the human body.

Similarly, his dad, Dr. David Hicks, a pulmonologist and neonatologist at CHOC for more than 40 years, had always been interested in medicine as well. David wanted to become a veterinarian initially, like his father, but eventually went to medical school.

Tim Hicks and David Hicks
Tim Hicks, pediatric resident at CHOC Children’s and UC Irvine, with his father, Dr. David Hicks, pulmonologist and neonatologist at CHOC Children’s, at Tim’s white coat ceremony in June 2016. David, once a pediatric resident, chief resident and fellow at CHOC himself, was able to put the coat on his son at the ceremony — a special moment for both doctors.

During his long and successful tenure at CHOC, David has enjoyed seeing the hospital’s growth and working alongside such a compassionate and dedicated team.

“What’s most inspiring at CHOC is the desire of our nurses and doctors to treat their patients as if they were their own. That, and when I see the smiles on the parents’ faces when their kids get better, is what inspires me to continue to do this,” says the 74-year-old physician.

It’s that same drive that motivates Tim to follow in his dad’s footsteps. His goal is to become a pediatrician, and he is also exploring a possible subspecialty.

“I really enjoy treating and hanging out with kids. They manage to smile even in a very difficult time. Their light-heartedness and innocent outlook is refreshing in many ways,” Tim says.

Tim’s relationship with CHOC goes back even further, however. His dad recalls the time when Tim, a teen then, was admitted to CHOC to be treated for a splenic fracture.

“Little did we know then that he would be back as a pediatric resident one day,” David says. “It was a few scary days in the PICU. Moments like that teach you that life is precious and things can change very quickly.”

Today, as a resident at CHOC, Tim enjoys meeting colleagues who have worked with his dad. He’s even had the privilege of meeting some of his dad’s former patients.

“We’ve definitely had fun, interesting conversations at the dinner table,” Tim says. “He’s given me great advice and taught me to treat the patient as a person; that it’s important to take care of their unique, individual needs with care and compassion.”

Tim also appreciates his dad’s outlook on the importance of a work-life balance, something he witnessed first-hand growing up. Despite his busy schedule, David always made time for things like attending his kids’ sports games, Tim remembers.

“I’ve always told my kids to find what they really love and follow that path,” David says. “And that family is very important. I owe everything to my wife, Gayle, who has taken on 50 percent of the battle, always supporting me and raising our four wonderful children.”

As Father’s Day nears, Tim – or “Hicks 2.0,” as he jokingly refers to himself – couldn’t be prouder to follow his dad’s path.

“My dad is an incredible role model and friend. I’m not only thankful for his guidance in life but also in medicine,” he says.