CHOC Experts Discuss Drowning Prevention

Drowning is the second leading cause of unintentional, accidental death in children, two CHOC Children’s experts tell “American Health Journal.”

Drowning is completely preventable, and CHOC offers a robust water safety program, say Dr. Paul Lubinsky, a CHOC critical care specialist, and Michelle Lubahn, a community education coordinator at CHOC.

Learn more about drowning and its prevention in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 40 million households. Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics.

For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

Paul Lubinksy, M.D., served his internship at Groote Schuur Hospital and the Red Cross Children’s Hospital in Capetown, South Africa. He served as chief resident at UC Irvine Medical Center in Orange followed by a pediatric critical care fellowship at CHOC Children’s.

CHOC Children’s Grand Rounds Video – The Performing Arts Athlete: Anticipatory Guidance & Evaluation – Dr. Chris Koutures

After watching “The Performing Arts Athlete: Anticipatory Guidance & Evaluation” by CHOC pediatrician and sports medicine expert Chris Koutures, MD, pediatric health care providers will feel more confident in addressing specific medical and musculoskeletal concerns of young performing artists. Pediatricians can use their knowledge of adolescent emotional and physical development to make concrete recommendations about appropriate nutrition, reducing the risk of overload, diminishing hearing loss, and preserving voice quality and pitch.

In the video, Dr. Koutures demonstrates a case-based approach to the presentation, evaluation, and management of common performing arts musculoskeletal complaints, including neck and shoulder pain, lower back pain, hip/knee concerns, and foot/ankle issues. A practical description of relevant anatomy combined with descriptions of how performers frequently “cheat” and use poor mechanics will quickly make the viewer far more adept in providing activity-specific recommendations to young performers and their families.

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Dr. Nguyen Pham Addresses Choking Hazards, Prevention

Choking is the leading cause of death and injury among children, particularly in children ages 3 and younger, a CHOC Children’s otolaryngologist tells “American Health Journal.”

Food, toys and coins are the primary causes of choking in children in this age group, says Dr. Nguyen Pham. Spherical toys are of particular concern, as are latex balloons. Hotdogs, grapes and nuts are especially dangerous foods, Dr. Pham says.

Learn more about choking hazards, including prevention and treatment, in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 40 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

Nguyen Pham, M.D., attended medical school at UC Irvine, and then completed his internship and residency in otolaryngology at the UC Davis Medical Center in Sacramento. He conducted his fellowship in pediatric otolaryngology at Stanford University in Palo Alto.

It’s All About Comfort in CHOC’s Fully Integrated Operating Rooms

One of seven operating rooms in the Tidwell Procedure Center at CHOC Children's Hospital.
One of seven operating rooms in the Tidwell Procedure Center, inside the Bill Holmes Tower at CHOC Children’s Hospital.

Comfort comes in many forms at CHOC Children’s, and not all of them involve a prescription pad. And that’s important because pain management is highly complex and must be individualized for each patient’s physical, developmental and emotional needs.

“Our goal is to keep our patients as comfortable as possible,” said Dr. Paul Yost, a pediatric anesthesiologist at CHOC. “And sometimes we can use distraction in a way that is much more beneficial to our patients than pain medication. Distraction and other non-medication techniques may allow patients to leave the hospital sooner, with less discomfort and fewer complications.”

At CHOC you will find state-of-the-art inpatient and outpatient surgical care provided within a compassionate, family centered, all-pediatric environment. Our pediatric anesthesiologists are experts in the many techniques that provide comfort, while promoting faster healing and recovery.

Additionally, CHOC offers pain management consultation for all patients around the clock. Our pain management team includes Dr. Hai Nguyen, a fellowship-trained pediatric pain management specialist, and Cheryl Deters, a nationally certified pediatric nurse practitioner.

A child life specialist and young boy interact in the main lobby of the Tidwell Procedure Center.
A child life specialist and young boy interact in the main lobby of the Tidwell Procedure Center.

“For a child, fear and anxiety equal pain,” Dr. Yost said. “The mind plays a very important part in how the body responds to comfort, so we work very hard to minimize fear.”

Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the pain management team works closely with CHOC Psychology, Child Life and other medical specialties. In addition to distraction, non-medication pain management techniques may include guided imagery, traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, acupressure, massage, and art and music therapy.

“We have the skills and tools to help our patients cope, including many options that only a children’s hospital can provide,” Dr. Yost said. “Choosing to bring a child here is the most important decision a parent can make. We have the expertise to get our patients through situations as safely and comfortably as possible.”

For more about surgery services at CHOC, please click here.

Dr. Anjan Batra Discusses Sudden Cardiac Arrest

Though rare, sudden cardiac arrest can be due to a range of underlying cardiac conditions, a CHOC Children’s cardiologist tells “American Health Journal.”

This can occur at anytime, but more often during sports activities, Dr. Anjan Batra says. Early indicators may be rapid heart rates, palpitations or chest pain during exercise. Dr. Batra recommends every child undergo a physical exam that includes cardiac screening.

Learn more about sudden cardiac arrest and its prevention in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 40 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

Anjan Batra, M.D., attended medical school at Ohio State University and completed his internship, residency and fellowship at the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles.