In the Spotlight: Peter Yu, M.D.

Peter Yu, M.D. A new pediatric surgeon with unique expertise in fetal surgery has joined CHOC Children’s Specialists Pediatric Surgery. Dr. Peter Yu specializes in the full spectrum of pediatric surgery, including neonatal, thoracic, and hernia surgery, and has quickly become an integral part of the surgery team.

“I’m extremely happy to be at CHOC,” Dr. Yu says. “There is so much talent and potential here, as well as a pioneering spirit and willingness to undertake big things.”

He is working closely with Dr. David Gibbs, division chief, pediatric surgery, CHOC Children’s Specialists, and Dr. Mustafa Kabeer, pediatric surgeon, CHOC Children’s Specialists, to launch a multi-disciplinary fetal surgery program at CHOC in the near future.

This highly complex surgery was uncharted territory about 30 years ago, Dr. Yu says. Many advances have been made in the field since, including new techniques that have allowed for the in utero surgical intervention of previously unsurvivable conditions. With special training from The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, one of the pioneering institutions in fetal surgery, Dr. Yu is determined to bring that level of expert care to CHOC and add to his team’s scope of services.

Among his goals, he hopes to help his team enhance the trauma program, advance CHOC’s minimally invasive surgery program, and increase CHOC’s national reputation through quality patient care and innovative research.

A passion for pediatric surgery

Dr. Yu followed in his older brother’s footsteps to become a doctor and attended Stanford University for his undergraduate studies. He graduated from the medical school at University of Missouri School of Medicine, where he fell in love with the culture and technical aspects of surgery, as well as the potential to make sick patients better quickly.

“I realized that the best surgeons were kind, dedicated, hard-working and team players – traits that I really value. When I discovered pediatric surgery, I felt it was a perfect fit for me, as it allows me to take care of children with an incredibly broad spectrum of pathology through surgical excellence,” he says.

Dr. Yu completed his general surgery residency at University of California, San Diego, followed by a surgical critical care fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital and a pediatric surgery fellowship at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Additionally, he is board certified in general surgery, pediatric surgery and surgical critical care, and is currently working on a master of public health degree from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

This dedicated physician is interested in outcomes research to better understand the end results of specific health care practices and interventions.

“We presently live in an era where massive amounts of data are available at the click of a few buttons. The roadblock for many physicians is that we often don’t know how to access this data or organize it,” Dr. Yu explains. “My goal, along with my partner, Dr. Yigit Guner, as well as the division of pediatric general and thoracic surgery at CHOC, is to build an outcomes research center. This center will help all CHOC physicians access healthcare data and turn it into something meaningful so that we can provide the highest quality of clinical care to our patients, and do so in a financially sustainable manner.”

Dr. Yu has given numerous national presentations at meetings such as the American College of Surgeons Clinical Congress and the Association for Academic Surgery and Society of University Surgeons Academic Surgical Congress. He is a member of several organizations, including the American Pediatric Surgical Association and Society of Critical Care Medicine.

In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with his wife and three children. He also enjoys surfing, basketball and competitive swimming on a local U.S. Masters swim team.

To get in contact with Dr. Yu or to refer a patient, please call 714-364-4050.

CHOC Children’s Grand Rounds Video: Hypotonia in an Infant – A Case Review

In this CHOC Children’s grand rounds video presentation, Dr. Jenna Timboe, third-year pediatric resident at CHOC/UCI, highlights a case of a 4-month-old presenting with hypotonia, also known as “rag doll” syndrome.  Dr. Timboe explains how to evaluate an infant with hypotonia and how to differentiate between various etiologies.

In addition, she reviews the history of botulism and associated risk factors.  She also provides an overview of the diagnostic evaluation of botulism and explains who to contact if botulism is suspected.  Lastly, she reviews treatment and expected prognosis.

Understanding how to appropriately diagnose and treat botulism can impact the duration of the illness and the need for ICU support.

CHOC is proud to offer continuing medical education and grand rounds on topics of interest to medical and allied professionals.

View previous grand rounds videos.

CHOC DOCTORS’ DAY CELEBRATION

In recognition of Doctors’ Day, we would like to take the opportunity to recognize our physicians for their dedication to the children we serve. Each day they offer hope and healing through their compassionate and world-class care.

A luncheon, themed “CHOC Docs Lift Us Up,” will be held on:

April 8, 2016

11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

CHOC Children’s Hospital

1201 W. La Veta Ave., Orange, Ca 92868

Bill Holmes Tower, second floor outdoor patio

Recognition ceremony begins promptly at noon.

Please note: If you need a professional head shot, there will be a photographer available on site to take photos.

Please RSVP by March 25 at http://www.choc.org/drday2016, or call Cristen Frost, in business development at CHOC, at 714-509-4807.

A luncheon at Mission Hospital will be held on:

March 30, 2016

11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Mission Hospital

27700 Medical Center Rd., Mission Viejo, Ca  92691

Tent outside tower 2

No RSVP is required.

CHOC Joins National Pediatrics Consortium to Fight Childhood Cancer

 

Announced this week, the Cancer Institute is among 10 founding members of the Cancer MoonShot 2020 Pediatrics Consortium, the pediatric arm of a collaborative initiative launched earlier this year involving academic institutions, insurers and pharmaceutical companies working to create a new paradigm in cancer treatment. Cancer MoonShot 2020 aims to initiate randomized Phase II trials in 20,000 patients with 20 tumor types of all stages within three years. Those findings would inform Phase III trials and the development of a vaccine-based immunotherapy by the year 2020.

Moonshot 2020’s Quantitative Integrative Lifelong Trial (QUILT) program will allow Pediatrics Consortium participants to apply the most comprehensive cancer molecular diagnostic testing available, as well as leverage proven and promising combination immunotherapies and clinical trials. Additionally, infrastructure established by MoonShot 2020 will allow for real-time data sharing to accelerate clinical learning and insight among participants.

“The Pediatric Cancer MoonShot 2020 is so visionary and, at the same time, has the capacity to disrupt the cancer health care industrial complex,” says Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Cancer Institute. “The Cancer MoonShot will attempt to cure all the numerous types of pediatric cancers with the least toxicity by harnessing the patients’ own immune systems and using the tumors’ unique genomic mutations to create individualized cancer vaccines.”

The work to be accelerated by Cancer MoonShot dovetails with existing efforts around genomic sequencing, precision medicine, bioinformatics and research at CHOC’s Cancer Institute. CHOC has been named a Caris Center of Excellence for its commitment to precision medicine, and participates in the California Kids Cancer Comparison, which brings big data bioinformatics to patients. CHOC has also recently enrolled its first patient in a multi-center clinical study for the treatment of relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with investigational immunotherapy.

“Our Center has studied the value of whole genome sequencing for several years and has recognized the enormous value in such a test to assist in clinical decision making,” Dr. Sender says. “Now with the availability of the next evolution of molecular diagnostics from the genome to the proteome, we are excited by the acceleration of knowledge that this system will provide and are honored to be a founding member of such an important initiative.”

20140916_2712The formation of the Cancer Moonshot 2020 Pediatrics Consortium was shaped by three underlying drivers:

  1. Treatment of cancer – a heterogeneous disease shaped by multiple variables – requires a more personalized and precise approach. The Pediatrics Consortium will lead and use next-generation precision clinical genomic-proteomics enabling doctors and patients to get the most comprehensive molecular diagnosis in the market.
  2. The collaboration across industry and the medical and scientific community, as well as whole genomic and proteomic sequencing and clinical trials established under Cancer MoonShot, will help reduce barriers in the battle against pediatric cancer.
  3. The benefits afforded by a real-time data sharing infrastructure established by Cancer MoonShot 2020, combined with multiple participation from pharmaceutical companies, have not previously been available to individual pediatric cancer centers.

In addition to CHOC, the other founding members of the Consortium are Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago; Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, Aflac Cancer & Blood Disorders Center; Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC; Duke Department of Pediatrics – Duke University School of Medicine;  Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah and Intermountain Primary Children’s Hospital; Phoenix Children’s Hospital; and Sanford Health.

 

 

CHOC Children’s Grand Rounds Video: Optic Neuritis in Pediatric Patients

In this CHOC Children’s grand rounds video, Dr. Chantal Boisvert, neuro-ophthalmologist, addresses optic neuritis in pediatric patients.  Specifically, she discusses how the presentation and outcome can be different for children compared to adults. Pediatric optic neuritis is often bilateral and tends to occur within one to two weeks after a known or presumed viral infection/vaccination. Children with optic neuritis are also at lower risk of developing MS compared to the adult population.

Dr. Boisvert also shares some of the challenges associated with diagnosing and treating optic nerve problems.  Sudden inflammation of the nerve, which carries visual information from the eye to the brain, can cause acute vision loss. Most cases will improve after a few weeks, but injury to the nerve fibers can sometimes result in permanent loss of vision. Physicians need to know when to refer to neuro-ophthalmologists. Neuro-ophthalmologists are familiar with all aspects of both optic nerve and brain disorders, and will be able to provide up-to-date recommendations on complex treatment issues and follow-up.

View previous grand rounds videos.