U.S. News Ranks CHOC Among Nation’s Best Children’s Hospitals

U.S. News & World Report has named CHOC Children’s one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals in the 2016-17 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings. CHOC ranked in eight specialties: cancer, neonatology, neurology/neurosurgery, pulmonology, orthopedics, gastroenterology and GI surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, and urology, which earned a “top 25” spot on the coveted list.

According to U.S. News, the Best Children’s Hospitals rankings are intended to help parents determine where to get the best medical care for their children. The rankings highlight the top 50 U.S. pediatric facilities in 10 specialties, from cancer to urology. Of the 183 pediatric medical centers participating in the survey, only 78 hospitals ranked in at least one specialty.

“The Best Children’s Hospitals highlight pediatric centers that offer exceptional care for the kids who need the most help,” said U.S. News Health Rankings Editor Avery Comarow. “Day in and day out, they deliver state-of-the-art medical care.”

For its annual list, U.S. News relies on extensive clinical and operational data, and on an annual survey of pediatric specialists. Survival rates, adequacy of nurse staffing, procedure volume and much more can be viewed on http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/pediatric-rankings .

In addition to being honored by U.S. News, CHOC has been distinguished, multiple times, as a Leapfrog Top Hospital for demonstrating excellence in hospital safety and quality.

Additional accolades highlighting CHOC’s commitment to the highest standards of care and performance include the gold-level CAPE Award from the California Council of Excellence, a honor for which CHOC was the only children’s hospital recognized in the state; Magnet distinction for nursing excellence; gold-level Beacon Award for Excellence, a distinction earned twice by CHOC’s pediatric intensive care unit team; a 2015 “Most Wired Hospital”; and The Advisory Board Company’s 2016 Workplace Transformation Award and the Workplace of the Year Award. Inspiring the best in her team, CHOC’s President and CEO Kimberly Chavalas Cripe was named a winner of the EY Entrepreneur of The Year® 2015 Award in the “Community Contributions” category for Orange County and Inland Empire.

CHOC PICU Honored for Exceptional Patient Care

The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) recently conferred a gold-level Beacon Award for Excellence on the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at CHOC Children’s Hospital. This is the second time CHOC has earned the gold-level distinction.b logo-edit yr 09-10 1fThe Beacon Award for Excellence— honoring exceptional patient care and healthy work environments—recognizes PICU caregivers who successfully improve patient outcomes and align practices with AACN’s six Healthy Work Environment Standards. Units that achieve this three-year, three-level award with gold, silver or bronze designations meet national criteria consistent with Magnet Recognition, the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the National Quality Healthcare Award.

Beacon Award logo

Beacon logo“The Beacon Award for Excellence recognizes caregivers in stellar units whose consistent and systematic approach to evidence-based care optimizes patient outcomes. Units that receive this national recognition serve as role models to others on their journey to excellent patient and family care,” explains AACN President Karen McQuillan, RN, MS, CNS-BC, CCRN, CNRN, FAAN.

CHOC’s PICU earned a gold award by meeting the following evidence-based Beacon Award for Excellence criteria:

  • Leadership structures and systems
  • Appropriate staffing and staff engagement
  • Effective communication, knowledge management, learning and development
  • Evidence-based practice and processes
  • Outcome measurement

About the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses: Founded in 1969, the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) is the largest specialty nursing organization in the world. AACN joins together the interests of more than 500,000 acute and critical care nurses, and claims more than 235 chapters worldwide. The organization’s vision is to create a healthcare system driven by the needs of patients and their families in which acute and critical care nurses make their optimal contribution.

Drs. Nick Anas and Mitchell Katz Discuss Success of CHOC’s Clinical Leadership Council  

Dr. Nick Anas, CHOC’s pediatrician-in-chief, sat down with Dr. Mitchell Katz, director of CHOC’s Multidisciplinary Feeding Program and pediatric GI lab services, to talk about CHOC’s Clinical Leadership Council (CLC), and how it has benefited programs like the feeding program.

CHOC’s Multidisciplinary Feeding Program is one of a few specialty feeding programs in the country to offer comprehensive outpatient consultation and inpatient programs. With the support and success of CLC’s process, the feeding program has grown tremendously and increased the number of patients it can treat.

Watch this brief video to learn more about CLC and the feeding program.

Meet Dr. Andrew Mower

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Andrew Mower, a pediatric neurologist.

Dr.Andrew_Mower_0699_2

Q: What is your education and training?
A: I attended medical school at St. George’s University School of Medicine in Grenada, West Indies. My residency in pediatrics was at Maimonides Medical Center in New York.  My residency in child neurology was at State University of New York Downstate (SUNY Downstate) in New York. My fellowship in clinical neurophysiology was at Columbia University in New York.

Q: What are your administrative appointments?
A: Quality Improvement Committee since 2016; Ancillary and Diagnostic services since 2015.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?
A: Epilepsy and epilepsy surgery

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?
A: Two years

Q: What are some new programs or developments within your specialty?
A: Stereotactic EEG for epilepsy surgery

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?
A: Epilepsy and headaches

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you or your division at CHOC?
A: We take on the most challenging epilepsy cases to search for cures, and, if not, at least an improvement in the child and family’s quality of life. We work together as a team to use all of our expertise to help the child and family.

Q:  What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?
A: I feel that we offer families hope when hope had been abandoned before.

Q: Why did you decide to become a doctor?
A: I decided to become a doctor to help people in need. I chose neurology as my specialty because I had a fascination with the nervous system and wanted to break misperceptions that little can be done for patients with neurological problems.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?
A: Farmer. I love the accomplishment of creating a garden and growing produce.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?
A: Gardening, running and hiking

Q: What was the funniest thing a patient told you?
A: “I don’t eat apples, doctor.”

“Why?”

“Because they keep the doctor away, and I like you, Dr. Mower.”

Meet Dr. Maryam Gholizadeh

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Maryam Gholizadeh, a pediatric surgeon.

Dr. Maryam Gholizadeh

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I attended medical school at George Washington University, and completed my residency at Eastern Virginia Medical School. I completed a pediatric surgery fellowship at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington D.C., and a pediatric surgical oncology fellowship at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

Q: What are your administrative appointments?

A: Pediatric surgery chief; chief of department of surgery; member of credentialing committee; member of medical executive committee and member of medical staff performance committee.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: All aspects of pediatric and neonatal surgery, surgical oncology and minimal invasive surgery.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?

A: 13 years.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: Appendicitis, hernias, lumps and bumps, as well as complex congenital pediatric and neonatal conditions.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about your division at CHOC?

A: As a general pediatric surgery division, we can take care of a variety of conditions such as hernias, hydroceles, gastrointestinal conditions requiring surgery, thoracic conditions, oncological problems requiring surgery such as neuroblastoma, Wilms’ tumor and teratomas.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?

A: We have a great group of specialists at CHOC who can deliver a high quality of care to our patients.

Q: Why did you decide to become a pediatric surgeon?

A: I decided to become a pediatric surgeon when I was a third year surgical resident on pediatric surgery rotation. Pediatric general surgery is the only field where you are able to take care of a variety of conditions. I found this field extremely rewarding, at the same time challenging.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A: An athlete. I love the challenge, the discipline, and the fact you are always trying to do your best.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: Running, cycling, skiing and playing with my dogs.

Q: What was the funniest thing a patient told you?

A: There was a young child around 8-9 years old and we were going to remove his appendix with laparoscopy. I was standing on his left side because with laparoscopy we make our incision on the left side. Just before he went to sleep he looked up at me and said, “Why are you standing on my left? My appendix is on the right.” I was amazed at how knowledgeable this kid was!