CHOC Metabolic Specialist Profiled in Science Magazine

The work of a CHOC Children’s metabolic disorders specialist and is highlighted in a recent Science magazine article.

The article hinges on Dr. Raymond Wang’s work to help a patient with a rare condition called Niemann-Pic Type C, a condition that causes cholesterol to accumulate in the brain, lungs, liver and spleen, leading to deterioration and early death.

Not only is the young girl doing well after Dr. Wang began an experimental treatment, but her family’s foundation also provided funding that allowed Dr. Wang to continue research that could help children with a rare metabolic diseases called mucopolysaccharidoses, or MPS.

To that end, the piece examines the tug of war felt by some physicians when balancing patient care and research. Despite a physician’s strong interest and commitment, research eludes many due to a lack of time and funding.

Read the full article in Science magazine.

Meet Dr. Anjalee Warrier Galion

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Anjalee Galion, a pediatric neurologist and sleep specialist.

CHOC Children's

Q: What is your education and training?
A:  I attended the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey- New Jersey Medical School, and completed my residency in pediatrics at University of San Francisco, Fresno.  During my academic year, I worked for Walter Reed Army Institute of Research to help identify a vaccine for malaria. My second day was September 11, 2011, and it was an amazing, humbling, and scary experience to be a part of the military for this day. My first fellowship was in pediatric neurology at the University of California, Irvine (UC Irvine), and my second fellowship was in sleep medicine at the University of California Los Angeles- Cedars Sinai Sleep Medicine Fellowship.

Q: What are your administrative appointments?
A: Assistant clinical professor at UC Irvine, assistant program director for the UC Irvine child neurology residency program, chair of the junior faculty leadership council, and co-chair of the sleep workgroup for the National Autism Treatment Network.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?
A: Sleep disorders in children with neurologic diseases such as epilepsy and autism, as well as sleep and cognition.

Q: Are you involved in any current research?

A: Evaluation of efficacy of specific sedative hypnotics in children with Autism spectrum disorder, and Identification of sleep architecture and pathology in children with epilepsy.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?
A: Four years.

Q: What are some new programs or developments within your specialty?
A: CHOC is one of the few, if only, hospitals in the country doing combined long-term video EEG as well as polysomnography (sleep study).  This allows us a very unique opportunity to look at the brain activity and pathology in sleep. Multidisciplinary sleep clinics involving psychology and pulmonology are also unique. Also, identification and treatment of a variety of pediatric sleep disorders including all types of insomnia, narcolepsy and parasomnias, such as sleepwalking/sleep talking/night terrors.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?
A: Insomnia, narcolepsy, sleepwalking (or somnambulism).

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you or your division at CHOC?
A: We treat all types of sleep-related disorders and are providing state-of-the-art care for children with sleep disorders. It is estimated that more than 30 percent of children have sleep-related disorders, and improvement in sleep is essential for learning and cognition. Research suggests improved sleep supports optimal athletic performance as well. If there is any concern for a sleep-related disorder we are happy to help evaluate these children.

Q:  What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?
A: We treat every child with the highest level of care and the physicians genuinely care for the patients and our community.

Q: Why did you decide to become a doctor?
A: I had been interested in neuroscience since I was a Howard Hughes fellow at the University of Maryland, having done work in spinal cord regeneration. I heard a talk in my first year of medical school about pediatric neurology and haven’t looked back since.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?
A: If I was not a physician I would mostly likely be a PhD working in the field of neurobiology and sleep medicine. Both my parents were PhDs and I grew up hearing about fascinating advances in the world of science, so I have been drawn to science and research from a young age. For quite a few years I was strongly considering becoming a professional flute player. I was fortunate enough to travel through Italy with my youth symphony and performed around the country in orchestras, but science drew me in by the time I was in college.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?
A: I enjoy hosting parties and events for family and friends. Our family enjoys traveling and spending time together.

Q: What have you learned from your patients?
A: The best part about working with pediatric patients is that you are constantly reminded to enjoy life and be grateful for every day. The smallest things can make a child happy, like playing with a light-up toy or seeing bubbles, and it is a great reminder to take pleasure in all the simple things around us every day.

Domnic Fernandez Joins CHOC as Director, Hyundai Cancer Institute

Domnic Fernandez has been named director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s.  Working closely with hospital and physician leaders, he is responsible for advancing CHOC’s position as a leading destination for innovative pediatric and adolescent cancer treatments.

CHOC Children's

“The Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC has a stellar reputation, including being ranked a top pediatric cancer program by U.S. News & World Report.  Its physicians, researchers and staff are dedicated to changing the future of cancer treatments: finding a cure and securing meaningful survivorship for our patients.  I am honored to be a part of this team, and look forward to helping continue to secure the brightest and healthiest futures for children,” said Domnic.

Fernandez joins CHOC from Adventist Healthcare, where he served as a vice president overseeing outpatient practices at four regional hospitals.  Service lines under his purview included primary care, urgent care, pediatrics, endocrinology, cardiology, oncology, orthopedics, neurology, electrophysiology and obstetrics/gynecology.  In addition to improving productivity and increasing referrals, he created a patient experience team that helped increase patient satisfaction scores by 22 percent.

Previously, Fernandez has worked in a variety of leadership positions at hospitals in Virginia and Minnesota.   His healthcare experience includes practice management, strategic planning, business development, revenue cycle management, physician and patient satisfaction initiatives, regulatory compliance, clinical outcomes and continuous process improvements, and marketing.  In addition to launching new clinics and managing practice acquisitions, he’s assumed responsibility for several electronic health record (EHR) go lives and optimizations.

After earning his bachelor’s degree in physical therapy, Fernandez completed the master’s in health care administration program at St. Xavier University in Chicago.  He is a member of the Medical Group Management Association and American College of Medical Practice Executives.

“The Hyundai Cancer Institute is a gem in our community, and I look forward to working with our subspecialists and referring community physicians to ensure children get the excellent care they need close to home,” stated Domnic.

Domnic can be reached at dfernandez@choc.org.

 

CHOC Employee Gives Back Through CHOC Walk

For Devin Hugie, director of facilities, a tiny patient close to his heart makes it extra special to participate in the CHOC Walk in the Park.

Devin’s participation in the CHOC Walk began more than a decade ago – long before he was an employee. His wife was looking for a community event in which their family could get involved. Their daughter Ashlie, in junior high at the time, would voluntarily go door to door to raise funds, he recalls. The family was well aware of everything the hospital did for children in the community and they continued to support the CHOC Walk throughout the years.

Devin Hugie

In 2012, when an opportunity opened up to work for CHOC, Devin jumped at the chance to become part of the CHOC family. As an employee, he became even more involved with the CHOC Walk and formed “Team Hope.” The 50-member team, including Devin’s family, as well as friends and partners of the facilities department, has raised $9,340 this year. They hope to reach their goal of raising $10,000. Devin has personally raised $4,250, making him one of the top fundraising walkers.

Proceeds from the CHOC Walk help to fund education, research, and advance the health and well-being of children. More than 15,000 people are expected to attend this year.

“I’m blessed to be at CHOC. It really is about the kids and I can’t think of a more awesome cause,” Devin says.

In March 2014, this important cause hit even closer to home. Devin’s grandson, Noah, was unexpectedly admitted to CHOC’s neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for an infection in his lung. It was a scary time for Devin’s daughter, Ashlie — Noah’s mom — and the rest of the family. Today, Noah is a happy and healthy toddler, and the family is even more inspired to give back through the CHOC Walk.

“I’ve always known the great work that we do, but when a loved one becomes a patient it becomes more real. The care that my grandson received made it even more amazing to be a part of CHOC. I am so grateful,” Devin says.

The dedicated, fun-loving grandfather hopes his story will inspire others to get involved and give back.

“The morning of the Walk is filled with excitement,” he says. “You see all the various teams and the pictures of the many kids whose lives CHOC has touched; you feel grateful to be part of the bigger picture.”

The CHOC Walk in the Park presented by Disneyland Resort will be held October 30, 2016. Register and learn more. 

CHOC Children’s Breaks Ground for Pediatric Mental Health

As part of the transformative mental health initiative that CHOC and other Orange County leaders launched in May 2015, CHOC celebrated the start of construction on the first inpatient mental health center in Orange County.

To commemorate the important milestone, more than 150 leaders from CHOC and the community, including elected officials and members of the mental health task force, gathered for a ceremony at CHOC in support of the initiative, which will ensure children and adolescents with mental illness get the health care services and support they need. Speakers included Kimberly Cripe, CHOC ’s president and chief executive officer, Dr. Heather Huszti, CHOC’s chief psychologist, and Rick and Kay Warren, co-founders of Saddleback Church. The event included a brief tour of the inpatient mental health center currently under construction, highlighted by Kim Cripe breaking down a mock brick wall, as a symbolic display of breaking down barriers associated with mental health.

Rendering of CHOC Children's Inpatient Mental Health Center, scheduled to open in early 2018.
Rendering of CHOC Children’s Inpatient Mental Health Center,.

Scheduled to open in early 2018, the center – located on the third floor of CHOC’s Research Building on the main campus in Orange – will provide a safe, nurturing place for children ages 3 to 18, and specialty programming for children younger than 12. The center’s innovative floor plan was designed with guidance from national experts and incorporates elements of several exemplary programs. It will feature 18 private patient rooms in a secure and healing environment including an outdoor playground area to promote exercise and movement. Additional amenities include a multipurpose room, classroom, and a variety of rooms that support activities for children of different ages and needs.

Since the announcement of CHOC’s initiative last year, CHOC has made tremendous progress including the launch of an outpatient co-occurring clinic, in conjunction with Orange County Behavioral Health Services, for patients whose physical conditions are complicated by mental health challenges; the launch of mental health screenings for all 12-year-olds at their well child visits in the primary care setting; and through a grant, CHOC’s cystic fibrosis (CF) program expanded its social worker’s availability and has a designated psychologist to help patients and caregivers. CHOC is also completing a pilot in the primary care clinics where a psychologist is present to help the medical team screen for and address mental health issues, and help families address childhood obesity.

Staff training and recruitment is currently underway.

To learn more about CHOC and how it’s changing the way pediatric mental health is treated in Orange County, please visit www.choc.org/kidsmentalhealth.