Physician Wellness: Benefits of Gratitude

CHOC Physician Wellness Subcommittee Update
by Dr. Grace Mucci, Pediatric Neuropsychologist

Physician burnout is prevalent. According to the Mayo Clinic, up to 54% of doctors report at least one symptom of burnout. Further, it is estimated that the annual cost of that burnout is $4.6 billion per year in the form of physician turnover and reduced clinical hours, according to a study recently published by the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The experience of burnout results in feelings of cynicism, detachment from work, low sense of personal accomplishment, and emotional exhaustion. The reasons for burnout remain complicated, and a recent systematic review by the Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons Pakistan revealed both individual characteristics of physicians and variables within the working environment as contributory factors.

More specifically, work load appeared to be one of the main drivers and includes working hours, overnight duty, administrative duties, schedule and flexibility, and complexity of tasks. Feeling disconnected from colleagues or patients, poor communication or cooperation between colleagues and dealing with patients who disagree with treatment choices are additional sources of burnout.

Just as the causes of physician burnout are multi-factorial, the solutions encompass many strategies that include engaging in various lifestyle changes and systemic interventions.

One individual intervention that has been receiving more interest among researchers is gratitude. A 2017 study at UC Berkeley shows that the health benefits of expressing gratitude include increasing resilience to stress and boosting mental health. Gratitude also has been found to strengthen relationships and enhance mindfulness.

So, just how can we implement gratitude in everyday life? Here are a few ideas that can be applied easily:

  • Express gratefulness for the beauty in nature
  • Give thanks before eating food that has been prepared
  • Acknowledge service people you encounter throughout the day, such as a barista or worker
  • Keep a gratitude journal and write about all the things you’re thankful for prior to retiring for the night
  • Remember to tell your loved ones how much they are appreciated and one thing that you are grateful that they do every day
  • Surprise coworkers or even strangers by performing a random act of kindness
  • Keep a gratitude board where you document things you are thankful for, and be sure to review those items when you are having a difficult moment

At CHOC, several initiatives that promote this practice of expressing gratitude are underway. CHOC has partnered with the Institute for Healthcare Excellence (IHE) to offer an outstanding curriculum that helps build respect, trust and compassion, ultimately improving communication and empathy toward co-workers and patients and restoring joy to the practice of medicine.

In addition, CHOC’s Physician Wellness Subcommittee is busy planning a Wall of Gratitude in the physician dining room, where doctors can show gratitude and appreciation for their peers in real time.

We know that peer-to-peer recognition is important for strengthening the level of engagement and positive bonds among colleagues. We have all experienced the satisfaction of receiving kudos from our peers, and we want to make this easier and more visible to others. As we continue to advance these initiatives, be sure to practice those small but powerful strategies of expressing gratefulness in your everyday life.