Dr. Michael Cater Discusses Hives, Rashes

Hives and rashes can be caused by environmental factors, or reactions to food, medicine or a foreign agent, Dr. Michael Cater, a CHOC Children’s pediatrician, tells “American Health Journal.”

Ninety percent of rashes can be diagnosed based on their appearance and clinical presentation, says Dr. Cater. Many rashes and hives disappear quickly on their own without diagnosis, but rashes that are painful and persistent, and associated with fever, abdominal pain and sore joints need immediate attention, he adds.

Learn more about symptoms and treatment of whooping cough in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates and reaches more than 30 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

 

Michael Cater, M.D., attended medical school at Loma Linda University. He completed his internship and his residency training at UC Irvine. He is board certified with the American Board of Pediatrics. Dr. Cater is affiliated with the Orange County Medical Association, California Medical Association and the American Board of Pediatrics.

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Dr. Grace Mucci Addresses Concussion Management

Concussions are serious injuries that if tended properly won’t likely produce lasting damage, Dr. Grace Mucci, a CHOC Children’s psychologist, tells “American Health Journal.”

Symptoms of concussions include dizziness, balance problems and headache, as well as fatigue and confusion, says Dr. Mucci.

Learn more about diagnosis and treatment concussions in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 30 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

Grace Mucci, Ph.D., attended medical school at the California School of Professional Psychology. She completed her internship at Children’s Hospital of Orange County as well as performed a fellowship. Clinical and training interests include pediatric neuropsychological assessment; epilepsy and other neurological disorders; cognitive late effects from cancer treatment; and child and family coping.

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Dr. Vivian Tanaka Covers Anesthesia and Children

CHOC Children’s strives to minimize anxiety about anesthetizing children before procedures, Dr. Vivian Tanaka, an anesthesiologist, tells “American Health Journal.”

CHOC anesthesiologists work with child life specialists to help calm fears, and also encourage parents to ask questions, Dr. Tanaka says. Anesthesiologists might also use premedication to ease anxiety and smooth the injection of anesthesia, she adds.

Learn more about children and anesthesia, including common side effects, in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 30 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

 

Vivian Tanaka, M.D., attended medical school at Tufts University School of Medicine. She served a transitional internship at Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Newton, Mass., and her residency at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.

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Dr. James Pierog Discusses Fever in Children

A fever itself causes no harm and can even be a good thing, Dr. James Pierog, medical director of emergency medical services at CHOC Children’s, tells “American Health Journal.”

A fever is a way that the body fights infections, and may be caused by a variety of things, including a simple virus that needs no intervention or a serious bacterial infection, he says.

Learn more about fevers and when a child should go to the emergency room in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 30 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

 

James Pierog, M.D., is an emergency medicine specialist who is board certified in emergency medicine and pediatric emergency medicine. He attended medical school at UCLA. He completed an internship in internal medicine and his residency in emergency medicine at the USC, Los Angeles County Medical Center.

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Dr. Troy Reyna discusses hernias in children

While they are acquired in adults, hernias in children are caused by a non-closure of a normal opening, Dr. Troy Reyna, a pediatric surgeon at CHOC Children’s, tells “American Health Journal.”

Hernias in children are commonly found in the naval or groin, and a hernia’s bulge may be apparent at all times or only when a child is crying or coughing, says Dr. Reyna.

Learn more about hernias in children in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates and reaches more than 30 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

 

Troy Reyna, M.D., is board certified in pediatric surgery and general surgery by the American Board of Surgery. Dr. Reyna is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he majored in chemistry. He received his medical degree from Georgetown University Medical School. He completed his surgical internship at Walter Reed Army Medical Center and his surgical residency at Tripler Army Medical Center in Honolulu. Dr. Reyna served his pediatric surgery fellowship at Columbus Children’s Hospital.

Get more information about referring patients to CHOC, including referral information directory, services directory and referral guidelines.