CHOC nurse scientist to discuss collaborative innovation at national conference

A CHOC Children’s nurse scientist will discuss the health system’s culture of collaborative innovation this month at a prestigious Cleveland Clinic conference, marking the first time outside organizations have been invited to present.

Jennifer Hayakawa, DNP, CNS, CCRN, CNRN, will participate in a panel discussion titled “Teamwork makes the dream work” at the seventh annual Nursing Innovation Summit on Oct. 23.

Jennifer Hayakawa, CHOC Nurse Scientist

In her presentation, “Defending Childhood Through Collaborative Innovation,” Jennifer will discuss the role of a nurse scientist; CHOC’s infrastructure to support nurse innovation; and CHOC nurses’ collaboration with multidisciplinary teams while in pursuit of innovation.

Multidisciplinary collaboration at work

To illustrate the multidisciplinary collaboration at CHOC, Jennifer will also highlight a nurse-led innovation to study pediatric outcomes on a medical device that has been primarily used in adults. CHOC is among the first institutions worldwide to study the use of automated pupillometry in pediatrics. Pupillometers provide reliable and objective data to assist with early detection of subtle neurological changes. ​

“Quantitative pupillometry has been integrated into standard of care and clinical decision-making in adult intensive care units across the nation,” Jennifer says. “While there are multiple studies that validate the use of pupillary metrics to improve clinical outcomes in adult populations, there are very few published studies describing its use in children. Several children’s hospitals are using it, but we’re the first to develop a robust database. Through that, we’ve learned more about what works for our population and we have identified a few challenges unique to pediatrics.”

The idea to begin collecting this data came from the pediatric intensive care unit nurses at CHOC – and has led to a valued partnership with the device manufacturer. Through that relationship, a CHOC multidisciplinary research team will soon begin evaluating the use of pupillary metrics in the assessment and management of concussion, Jennifer says.

“This will help our industry partner to improve their product and will allow us to learn more about application of this new technology in diverse clinical populations,” she says. “We collaborated with the CHOC Research Institute and Innovation Lab to connect with lawyers to get advice about intellectual property and data use agreement contracts. That’s the focus of the conference and panel – working together to innovate healthcare – navigating all of those moving parts.”

During the panel, Jennifer will share the stage with a physician and a patent attorney, and she’s thrilled for the opportunity.

“Working collaboratively to innovate care is something I’m really passionate about,” she says.

The path to a research career

Jennifer’s path toward becoming a nurse scientist at CHOC began about 18 years ago, when she joined the organization as a unit secretary while in nursing school. Upon graduation, Jennifer began work at the bedside in the pediatric intensive care unit.

Through the years, she transitioned to an educator role and later to a clinical nurse specialist role.  About two years ago, Jennifer became CHOC’s nurse scientist.

“I never thought I’d move away from the bedside,” she says. “But my career path and professional growth has led to different opportunities.”

Jennifer credits participating in CHOC’s nursing research fellowship program with propelling her toward a career in research.

“I always knew research was an important part of my role as a clinical nurse specialist, but research always seemed daunting” she says. “Coming out of that program changed my perspective and gave me the confidence to pursue my doctorate degree.”

Research isn’t done in a silo

In her role today, Jennifer is charged with nurturing a culture of inquiry at CHOC. Critical to that is building infrastructure, while also mentoring and guiding nurses through the research process.

Jennifer incorporates her experience as an intimated nascent researcher when working today with nurses considering an investigation or embarking upon a new project.

“I tell them they don’t have to do it alone,” she says. “Research and innovation isn’t done in a silo; it’s done through a lot of multidisciplinary collaboration.”

As the role nurses play in CHOC’s culture of inquiry continues to deepen, the results are evident: In fiscal year 2019, CHOC nurses presented 31 posters and 24 podium presentations at local and national conference and published five articles in peer-reviewed journals.

“Research is integral to the care we provide at CHOC Children’s,” Jennifer says. “For families, it represents hope – hope for improved quality of life, hope for a cure, or hope to help other children and their families. It is an honor and a privilege to be a part of a team of talented people providing this innovative care.

Learn more about nurse research and evidence-based practice at CHOC Children’s.

2015 CHOC Children’s – UC Irvine Child Health Research Awards

We are pleased to announce that we just completed another round of the CHOC Children’s – UC Irvine Child Health Research Awards, our annual call for proposals that enhance research collaborations between CHOC and UC Irvine and further the Mission, Vision and strategic aims of the CHOC-UCI Child Health Research Strategic Plan. Intended to support research and collaboration in targeted areas of research excellence that align research strengths for focused growth and maximal translational impact, our call this year specifically solicited applications for two funding mechanisms, Pilot Collaborative Research Awards and Clinician Investigator Awards.

Child Health Research Award - UC Irvine Infographic

Pilot Collaborative Research Awards are intended to provide funds for collaborative projects in need of initial start-up funding to enable procurement of other independent support. These awards are designed to promote novel, translational research efforts that coalesce talented clinicians and researchers from CHOC and UC Irvine. Projects bring investigators from multiple disciplines from CHOC and UC Irvine together to identify targets for improved diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of a pediatric health problem relevant to the goals of the CHOC-UCI Child Health Research Strategic Plan.

Clinician Investigator Awards are intended to provide funds for clinician-investigator initiated projects in need of funding to advance study into a clinically relevant and important topic that has a high likelihood of impacting clinical practice and the positive experience of pediatric/ adolescent patients and their families. Priorities are given to proposals that are closely aligned with the research themes identified in the CHOC – UCI Child Health Research Strategic Plan. Projects identify targets for improved diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of a pediatric health problem relevant to the goals of the CHOC-UCI Child Health Research Strategic Plan. Collaborations between CHOC and UCI faculty are strongly encouraged, but not required.

This year we received 18 proposals, an increase of 13% over last year, covering a wide range of topics and specialties. After external academic peer reviews and committee discussions, we decided to fund 6 projects, 3 Pilot Collaborative Research Awards and 3 Clinician Investigator Awards.

Congratulations to the well-deserving recipients of the 2015 awards! They are listed below, in order of award type and Principle Investigator’s last name.

 

Pilot Collaborative Research Awards.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Gurpreet Ahuja

Collaborators: Drs. Nguyen PhamKevin Huoh, Naveen Bhandarkar, Carolyn Coughlan, Joon You

Project Title: NIR Imaging of Pediatric Sinuses

 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Tami John

Collaborators: Drs. Lilibeth Torno, Daniela Bota, Grace Mucci, Mary Zupanc, Jack Lin

Project Title: Cognitive Training to Promote Neuroplasticity and Neural Re-circuitry in Chemotherapy

Associated Cognitive Impairment

 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Calvin Li

Collaborators: Drs. John Weiss, Hong Yin, William Loudon

Project Title: A Tunable Engineered Tissue Graft Model for Repair of Traumatic Brain Injury

 

Clinician Investigator Awards

Principal Investigator: Dr. Antonio Arrieta

Collaborators: Drs. Katrine Whiteson, David Michalik

Project Title: Addressing the Fear Factor in Neonatal Serious Bacterial Infections: Distinguishing E Coli From Bacteremia, Urinary Tract Infection, and Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection in Infants <28 Days vs. >28 Days to 90 Days Old by Pairing E. Coli Genome Analysis with Clinical Data

 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Joanne Starr

Collaborators: Drs. Richard Gates, Sharief Taraman, Mary Zupanc, Paul Yost, Michele Domico, Juliette Hunt, Tammy Yoon, Kimberley Lakes

Project Title: Seizures and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Mild Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass

 

Principal Investigators: Dr. Sharief Taraman and Ruth McCarty

Collaborators: Drs. William Loudon, Frank Hsu

Project Title: The Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as a Complementary Treatment of Pediatric and Young Adults with Post-Concussive Syndrome

CHOC Researchers to Present at Upcoming Conference

CHOC Children’s will be well represented at a prestigious upcoming pediatrics conference, with two research projects set to be presented.

At the 2015 Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting later this month, CHOC infectious disease physicians will present the outcomes of a study that examined the efficacy of the pneumococcal disease vaccine in Orange County youth.

The study shows that the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease has decreased in Orange County children every year since the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-13) was introduced in 2010, says Dr. Antonio Arrieta, chief of infectious disease at CHOC.

CHOC Children's Research Institute

Researchers looked at all Orange County children who developed invasive pneumococcal disease, found each case’s bacteria serotype, and determined whether it was a vaccine type.

“We were able to show that the difference was for the whole population and more noticeable in children 5 and younger, who are more susceptible,” Dr. Arrieta says. “The vaccine is doing its job.”

The results show that PCV-13 has improved upon the already good outcomes from the vaccine’s previous incarnation, PCV-7, which was released in 2000.

“The vaccine is very expensive, so we are putting our money on something that is working,” Dr. Arrieta says. “It was very important to ascertain that the vaccine worked because when this was approved, it was approved without clinical trials. It was approved only with immunogenicity data.”

Drs. Michele Cheung, Delma Nieves and Jasjit Singh, as well as Stephanie Osborne, a CHOC clinical research nurse, also authored the study, which was conducted in partnership with the Orange County Health Care Agency and Kaiser.

Also, the conference will feature a project co-led by Dr. Dan Cooper, CHOC’s chief academic officer, on exercise biomarkers and translational research in child health.

The annual meeting will be held April 25-28 in San Diego.