CHOC awarded ACEs Aware grant funding to provide trauma-informed care training

CHOC Children’s has received $180,000 in grant funds from the Office of the California Surgeon General and the Department of Health Care Services to participate in the state’s ACEs Aware initiative.

The initiative seeks to change and save lives by helping Medi-Cal providers understand the importance of screening for Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and training them to respond with trauma-informed care.

CHOC will use its grant funds to conduct supplemental training to promote the ACEs Aware initiative among the Medi-Cal provider community in Orange County. Through this training, providers will learn the importance of incorporating ACE screenings into their clinical practice, as well as how to administer screenings, use clinical protocols to determine evidence-based treatment plans, and provide trauma-informed care. Trainings will also include mental health providers and school professionals to encourage communication and coordination between important systems in children’s lives.

“At CHOC, trauma-informed care is embedded into our treatment and interactions with our patients and families,” said Dr. Heather Huszti, CHOC’s chief psychologist. “The COVID-19 emergency underscores the critical need of using trauma-informed care to treat the whole child. We are so grateful to have received this funding to help teach providers throughout Orange County about the importance and practice of trauma-informed care.”s

CHOC was among 100 organizations throughout the state to receive a total of $14.3 million to extend the reach and impact of the ACEs Aware initiative. These grants will provide funding to organizations to design and implement training, provider engagement, and education activities for providers and organizations that serve Medi-Cal beneficiaries.

“We are looking forward to working in partnership with this amazing group of community leaders to further our efforts to help health care providers become ACEs Aware,” said California Surgeon General Dr. Nadine Burke Harris. “This work is critical, now more than ever, given the stress so many Californians are experiencing as a result of COVID-19 and the role of racial injustice as a risk factor for toxic stress. A trauma-informed health care workforce is vital for helping our state heal.”

The grant funding will provide critical support to community organizations serving Medi-Cal providers and beneficiaries, which have been experiencing increased stress during the COVID-19 emergency. Grant activities will augment California’s efforts, underway since the summer of 2019, to develop provider training and engage providers, including the promotion of payments to Medi-Cal providers for screening their patients for ACEs.

Added Dr. Karen Mark, DHCS medical director: “DHCS is committed to preserving and improving the overall health and well-being of all Californians. The ACEs Aware initiative is a vital part of the Medi-Cal program’s response to the COVID-19 emergency. These grants will help us reach Medi-Cal providers who serve diverse and often at-risk populations throughout the state, and will help to ensure that Medi-Cal members receive the high-quality, integrated care that every Californian deserves.”

Funding for the ACEs Aware grants was previously authorized in the 2019-20 budget using Proposition 56 funds for provider training on how to conduct ACE screening in the Medi-Cal population. In light of the COVID-19 emergency, the grant funding will provide critical support to the community organizations serving Medi-Cal providers and beneficiaries.

View the full list of ACEs Aware grantees.

CHOC Children’s Celebrates Completion of Mental Health Inpatient Center

CHOC Children’s leaders joined with mental health supporters today to celebrate the completion of our pediatric health care system’s Mental Health Inpatient Center, which will provide the first psychiatric inpatient beds in Orange County for children younger than 12 years old.

Set to open in April 2018, the 12,000-square foot, 18-bed facility will serve children ages 3 to 17. It is the only facility in California to offer all private rooms, as well as an option for parents to stay overnight with their children, as appropriate.

One in five children experience a diagnosable mental health condition during childhood — about 150,000 children in Orange County alone. Previously, the absence of designated space to treat young patients and a shortage of beds for adolescents in Orange County meant that often children with serious mental health episodes remained in emergency departments for days at a time waiting for a bed in an outside county.

One of the Center’s activity rooms.

“For the first time, Orange County children younger than 12 experiencing a mental health crisis will have a place for care close to home,” CHOC President and CEO Kimberly Chavalas Cripe said. “The Center’s completion is evidence of CHOC’s commitment to ensuring that every Orange County youth receives the mental health care services they need in a safe and healing environment.”

The Center’s other unique features include two sensory rooms – one sensory-rich and the other low-stimulation to help children learn to manage strong emotions and calm themselves. In addition, the facility includes a 3,600-square-foot outdoor play area with sensory activities and a basketball court.

The Center’s innovative floor plan was designed with guidance from national experts and incorporates elements of several exemplary programs observed by CHOC staff. It was built with two primary goals in mind: patient safety and creating an optimal healing environment. The facility incorporates safety features such as shatterproof glass, special high-density materials, doors that open one at a time, and many other measures. The design includes elements of nature, curved features and a soothing color palette to promote healing and relaxation.

With pediatric psychiatrist Dr. Hoang “Wayne” D. Nguyen as its medical director, the Center will offer specialty programming to children 12 and younger. Patients will participate in therapeutic programming seven days per week, which is unique among inpatient facilities. During their stay, typically five to seven days, patients will also have access to medical specialists if assessments suggest a relationship between the mental health condition and an underlying health issue.

CHOC broke ground on the Center in September 2016. The Center was announced in May 2015 as the centerpiece of a pediatric system of mental health care that would be scalable and replicable by other health systems nationwide.

“CHOC is committed to the truth that mental health is as important as physical health,” Cripe said. “Put simply, health is health. We want to create a system that others can replicate and help empower health systems across the country to support children’s mental health.”

CHOC’s broad and robust pediatric system of mental health care has been built to facilitate early diagnosis, intervention and treatment of pediatric mental health problems.

The system’s components include the ASPIRE® (After School Program Interventions and Resiliency Education) Intensive Outpatient Program at CHOC Children’s, designed to prevent psychiatric hospitalization and re-admission; mental health screenings in primary and specialty care settings; pediatric mental health training for community health care providers, school personnel and therapists; and a co-occurring clinic for patients with mental health challenges complicated by physical illnesses.

Other aspects include mental health triage at the Julia and George Argyros Emergency Department at CHOC Children’s Hospital; an early childhood mental health initiative set to begin in spring 2018 that is aimed at reducing behavior-related suspensions from child care and preschool settings; and faith community partnerships.

“While the Mental Health Inpatient Center at CHOC Children’s will support children and families while in crisis, we cannot meet all the needs for pediatric mental health care alone,” Cripe said. “By joining with our community partners, we are working together to ensure that children get the help they need when they need it and where they need it.”

Learn more about CHOC’s mental health services at www.choc.org/mentalhealth.