Study determines that Pain Buddy app may aid in reduction of pain severity

A child, resting in bed, fires up her 7-inch tablet and opens an app.

She selects from a variety of cartoon avatars — such as a panda or penguin — and backgrounds that include a colorful ocean floor with fish and other sea creatures.

Game on.

But this isn’t a typical game. It’s a kid-friendly tool that allows the child, who is being treated for cancer, to report the severity and type of pain she’s experiencing from her home — information her doctor can access in real time.

Playing their way to pain reduction

The app, named Pain Buddy, may aid in the reduction of pain severity in children during cancer treatment, according to results of a pilot study recently published in the online journal Pediatric Blood & Cancer.

The study found that Pain Buddy may be especially beneficial in helping children who have high levels of pain.

Pain Buddy app
Pain Buddy app

Pain Buddy is the brainchild of Michelle A. Fortier, a CHOC Children’s pediatric psychologist who is also a faculty member of the UC Irvine Sue & Bill Gross School of Nursing.

Fortier, who specializes in pain management in children, was principal investigator of the recently published pilot study. that was based on clinical studies of CHOC patients monitored by pediatric oncologist Dr. Lilibeth Torno and pediatric oncology nurse practitioner Christine Yun.

“Pain management is an important part of cancer survivorship, and I think Pain Buddy’s potential for use is very broad,” Dr. Torno says.

Most of the 48 children participating in the eight-week study had been diagnosed with leukemia. All were between the ages of 8 and 18. Results of this particular study come amid ongoing studies on the Pain Buddy app at other sites., Results of the comprehensive research effort, which will track 206 children, are expected in three years, Fortier says.

Pain Buddy app
The Pain Buddy app allows users to identify their pain through various games, like sorting balls into baskets.

The gap in children’s pain management

Pain Buddy, Fortier explained, was developed a few years ago to address a gap in pain management of kids at home compared to kids in the hospital, where it’s easier for doctors and nurses to stay on top of patients’ needs. The 48 children who participated in the pilot study spent a lot of time at home.

Tapping the expertise of professional app developers and researchers at UCI in the California Institute for Telecommunication and Information Technology (Calit2), Fortier and several other colleagues came up with a way for children to rate their pain as they were feeling it from home.

“Most kids experience pretty moderate to severe pain throughout their cancer treatment, and this pain just wasn’t sufficiently being addressed when the patients were at home,” Fortier says. “And when we think about pain assessment, we’re really terrible retrospective reporters of our pain experience.”

But with Pain Buddy, users can say how much they’re hurting, and where, as it’s happening.

“Pain can come from the cancer itself, such as a solid tumor, and it can come from treatment procedures,” Fortier says. “For example, lots of skin-breaking procedures occur during cancer treatment. And treatments like chemotherapy can cause nerve pain, inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and mouth sores.”

Pain Buddy app
The Pain Buddy app allows users to describe their pain with word bubbles, and can alert the care team.

In addition to completing a pain and symptom diary twice daily, the app automatically alerted the participants’ medical teams about such symptoms as nausea, itching, sadness and redness.

With a touch of a finger, the patients could select word bubbles to indicate descriptions — such as bad, annoying, or and terrible — to describe their pain.

Clinicians, in turn, could promptly address any symptoms that warranted intervention.

Learning skills to cope with pain

A key component of the Pain Buddy app, which for now only has been used by the pilot study participants, is the incorporation of coping skills shown to be effective in the management of pain, such as deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery.

During these skills training exercises, patients could accumulate coins and, visiting a virtual store, customize their personal avatar and buy additional background themes.

Pain Buddy app
The Pain Buddy app can help patients learn coping skills.

Pain Buddy represents an effective partnership between parents, young cancer patients and the health care institutions that treat them, Dr. Torno says.

“Our focus on cancer survivorship begins on the day of diagnosis,” Torno says.

CHOC’s After Cancer Treatment Survivorship (ACTS) program features a multidisciplinary team of clinical experts who monitor the late effects of cancer and develop a plan for long-term surveillance to ensure the best possible outcomes. Every child at CHOC who has gone through cancer therapy eventually lands in the ACTS program.

Fortier said the ultimate goal is to further refine Pain Buddy and license the app to hospitals for widespread use.

“The goal is to have every kid undergoing cancer treatment — from sarcoma patients to those with bone and other cancers — to have the ability to use Pain Buddy.”

What CHOC Physicians are Grateful for this Thanksgiving

As Thanksgiving approaches, CHOC Children’s physicians explain what they’ll consider when giving thanks this holiday.

 

“CHOC has provided me with lifelDr. Neda Zadehong blessings. I am grateful to have grown up at and with this hospital, from the initial CHOC Tower to the current Bill Holmes Tower, through pediatric residency training and beyond.  To now be a member of such a remarkable team of providers — including our nurses and support staff — is both humbling and inspiring. Every day, I am especially thankful for the families who cross our threshold, and entrust the care of their most precious children to us. With continued commitment and dedication toward the health and well-being of our children, the future will be brighter than any of us can imagine.”
– Dr. Neda Zadeh, genetics

 

Dr. Kenneth Grant

 

 

“I am thankful to be working for an organization that creates an environment where our patients become our family. I am also grateful that CHOC Children’s has the foresight to invest in the innovative ideas we have to improve the health care we provide.”
 – Dr. Kenneth Grant, gastroenterology

 

 

 

mackey_tg

 

“I am thankful for the opportunity with be partnered with an excellent children’s hospital. I am also thankful for the pleasure of working with other positive people who provide outstanding care to the children of Orange County. Together, we work to improve the care and services we deliver to our most important resource — our children.”
– Dr. Daniel Mackey, pediatrics

 

 

 

 

Dr. Lilbeth Torno

“I am grateful for the incredible team we have in oncology, inlcuding   doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, the research team, members of ancillary services, our inpatient, clinic and OPI staff, administrative support, and other subspecialists, who all have great minds and compassionate hearts, and walk the difficult cancer journey with our patients and their families. I am humbled to be with such great company here at CHOC, who care deeply for children.”
– Dr. Lilibeth Torno, oncology

 

 

 

goodman_tg“I am most grateful to the people behind the scenes at the hospital who do all the invisible jobs that are so important to keep CHOC Children’s running: the housekeepers, lab and x-ray technologists, bio-medical engineers, pharmacy technicians, scrub technicians, security guards and maintenance staff that work tirelessly, 24-hours a day.”
– Dr. Gary Goodman, critical care

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. William Loudon

“I am most thankful for the ability to practice alongside of the caring and professional staff and physicians at CHOC, who all share the common goal of caring for children. Working together, we are able to tackle incredibly complex and varied problems that present in the amazingly diverse population of children that we serve.”
Dr. William Loudon, neurosurgery

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I am thankDr. Amy Harrisonful for so many things here at CHOC. I feel truly blessed every day to have found a professional community of like-minded caregivers who share a passion and dedication for continued improvement in the care we provide. I am also so grateful for the opportunity to meet and care for such incredibly courageous patients and to become a part of their families. Finally, I am thankful to my teams within the pulmonary division, the Cystic Fibrosis Center and the muscular dystrophy clinics for their selfless care of our patients. I wish our entire community a healthy and happy holiday season.”
Dr. Amy Harrison, pulmonology

 

choc_zupanc

“I’m thankful for the opportunity to serve my patients and families, and to help them secure bright futures through CHOC’s world-class care. I am also so grateful to work among a team that is steadfastly committed to the health and well-being of children in our community and beyond. “
Dr. Mary Zupanc, neurology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

aminian

“I am thankful for the platform CHOC has given us to provide service to a community that inspires me daily. I am humbled to just be part of it all.”
Dr. Afshin Aminian, orthopaedics

2015 CHOC Children’s – UC Irvine Child Health Research Awards

We are pleased to announce that we just completed another round of the CHOC Children’s – UC Irvine Child Health Research Awards, our annual call for proposals that enhance research collaborations between CHOC and UC Irvine and further the Mission, Vision and strategic aims of the CHOC-UCI Child Health Research Strategic Plan. Intended to support research and collaboration in targeted areas of research excellence that align research strengths for focused growth and maximal translational impact, our call this year specifically solicited applications for two funding mechanisms, Pilot Collaborative Research Awards and Clinician Investigator Awards.

Child Health Research Award - UC Irvine Infographic

Pilot Collaborative Research Awards are intended to provide funds for collaborative projects in need of initial start-up funding to enable procurement of other independent support. These awards are designed to promote novel, translational research efforts that coalesce talented clinicians and researchers from CHOC and UC Irvine. Projects bring investigators from multiple disciplines from CHOC and UC Irvine together to identify targets for improved diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of a pediatric health problem relevant to the goals of the CHOC-UCI Child Health Research Strategic Plan.

Clinician Investigator Awards are intended to provide funds for clinician-investigator initiated projects in need of funding to advance study into a clinically relevant and important topic that has a high likelihood of impacting clinical practice and the positive experience of pediatric/ adolescent patients and their families. Priorities are given to proposals that are closely aligned with the research themes identified in the CHOC – UCI Child Health Research Strategic Plan. Projects identify targets for improved diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of a pediatric health problem relevant to the goals of the CHOC-UCI Child Health Research Strategic Plan. Collaborations between CHOC and UCI faculty are strongly encouraged, but not required.

This year we received 18 proposals, an increase of 13% over last year, covering a wide range of topics and specialties. After external academic peer reviews and committee discussions, we decided to fund 6 projects, 3 Pilot Collaborative Research Awards and 3 Clinician Investigator Awards.

Congratulations to the well-deserving recipients of the 2015 awards! They are listed below, in order of award type and Principle Investigator’s last name.

 

Pilot Collaborative Research Awards.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Gurpreet Ahuja

Collaborators: Drs. Nguyen PhamKevin Huoh, Naveen Bhandarkar, Carolyn Coughlan, Joon You

Project Title: NIR Imaging of Pediatric Sinuses

 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Tami John

Collaborators: Drs. Lilibeth Torno, Daniela Bota, Grace Mucci, Mary Zupanc, Jack Lin

Project Title: Cognitive Training to Promote Neuroplasticity and Neural Re-circuitry in Chemotherapy

Associated Cognitive Impairment

 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Calvin Li

Collaborators: Drs. John Weiss, Hong Yin, William Loudon

Project Title: A Tunable Engineered Tissue Graft Model for Repair of Traumatic Brain Injury

 

Clinician Investigator Awards

Principal Investigator: Dr. Antonio Arrieta

Collaborators: Drs. Katrine Whiteson, David Michalik

Project Title: Addressing the Fear Factor in Neonatal Serious Bacterial Infections: Distinguishing E Coli From Bacteremia, Urinary Tract Infection, and Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infection in Infants <28 Days vs. >28 Days to 90 Days Old by Pairing E. Coli Genome Analysis with Clinical Data

 

Principal Investigator: Dr. Joanne Starr

Collaborators: Drs. Richard Gates, Sharief Taraman, Mary Zupanc, Paul Yost, Michele Domico, Juliette Hunt, Tammy Yoon, Kimberley Lakes

Project Title: Seizures and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Mild Hypothermic Cardiopulmonary Bypass

 

Principal Investigators: Dr. Sharief Taraman and Ruth McCarty

Collaborators: Drs. William Loudon, Frank Hsu

Project Title: The Use of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) as a Complementary Treatment of Pediatric and Young Adults with Post-Concussive Syndrome