What CHOC Physicians are Grateful for this Thanksgiving

As Thanksgiving approaches, CHOC Children’s physicians explain what they’ll consider when giving thanks this holiday.

 

“CHOC has provided me with lifelDr. Neda Zadehong blessings. I am grateful to have grown up at and with this hospital, from the initial CHOC Tower to the current Bill Holmes Tower, through pediatric residency training and beyond.  To now be a member of such a remarkable team of providers — including our nurses and support staff — is both humbling and inspiring. Every day, I am especially thankful for the families who cross our threshold, and entrust the care of their most precious children to us. With continued commitment and dedication toward the health and well-being of our children, the future will be brighter than any of us can imagine.”
– Dr. Neda Zadeh, genetics

 

Dr. Kenneth Grant

 

 

“I am thankful to be working for an organization that creates an environment where our patients become our family. I am also grateful that CHOC Children’s has the foresight to invest in the innovative ideas we have to improve the health care we provide.”
 – Dr. Kenneth Grant, gastroenterology

 

 

 

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“I am thankful for the opportunity with be partnered with an excellent children’s hospital. I am also thankful for the pleasure of working with other positive people who provide outstanding care to the children of Orange County. Together, we work to improve the care and services we deliver to our most important resource — our children.”
– Dr. Daniel Mackey, pediatrics

 

 

 

 

Dr. Lilbeth Torno

“I am grateful for the incredible team we have in oncology, inlcuding   doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, the research team, members of ancillary services, our inpatient, clinic and OPI staff, administrative support, and other subspecialists, who all have great minds and compassionate hearts, and walk the difficult cancer journey with our patients and their families. I am humbled to be with such great company here at CHOC, who care deeply for children.”
– Dr. Lilibeth Torno, oncology

 

 

 

goodman_tg“I am most grateful to the people behind the scenes at the hospital who do all the invisible jobs that are so important to keep CHOC Children’s running: the housekeepers, lab and x-ray technologists, bio-medical engineers, pharmacy technicians, scrub technicians, security guards and maintenance staff that work tirelessly, 24-hours a day.”
– Dr. Gary Goodman, critical care

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. William Loudon

“I am most thankful for the ability to practice alongside of the caring and professional staff and physicians at CHOC, who all share the common goal of caring for children. Working together, we are able to tackle incredibly complex and varied problems that present in the amazingly diverse population of children that we serve.”
Dr. William Loudon, neurosurgery

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I am thankDr. Amy Harrisonful for so many things here at CHOC. I feel truly blessed every day to have found a professional community of like-minded caregivers who share a passion and dedication for continued improvement in the care we provide. I am also so grateful for the opportunity to meet and care for such incredibly courageous patients and to become a part of their families. Finally, I am thankful to my teams within the pulmonary division, the Cystic Fibrosis Center and the muscular dystrophy clinics for their selfless care of our patients. I wish our entire community a healthy and happy holiday season.”
Dr. Amy Harrison, pulmonology

 

choc_zupanc

“I’m thankful for the opportunity to serve my patients and families, and to help them secure bright futures through CHOC’s world-class care. I am also so grateful to work among a team that is steadfastly committed to the health and well-being of children in our community and beyond. “
Dr. Mary Zupanc, neurology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

aminian

“I am thankful for the platform CHOC has given us to provide service to a community that inspires me daily. I am humbled to just be part of it all.”
Dr. Afshin Aminian, orthopaedics

CHOC Provides Comprehensive Care for Children with Neurofibromatosis Type 1

CHOC Children’s Neurofibromatosis Program – a recently nationally recognized program by the Children’s Tumor Foundation as a Neurofibromatosis Affiliate Clinic – provides comprehensive care to even the most rare medical issues in association with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).

Dr. Neda Zadeh
Dr. Neda Zadeh

NF1 is a common genetic condition that primarily affects the skin and the nervous system and is caused by a change or mutation in a single gene called NF1.  This condition occurs in approximately one in every 3,000 children. The majority of these children do very well, have happy and healthy lives and may not have major skin issues, developmental disabilities or other neurological issues, says Dr. Neda Zadeh a CHOC medical geneticist and associate director of the Molecular Diagnostic Laboratory at Genetics Center.  However, due to the known complications that can accompany this condition, comprehensive multidisciplinary care is strongly recommended.

“Half of the time, NF1 can occur for the first time in a child due to a spontaneous mutation in the NF1 gene at the time of conception, and is not inherited from a parent,” explains Dr. Zadeh. “It is important for parents to realize that this condition is not the result of anything an expectant mother did or did not do during her pregnancy. In the other 50 percent of patients, we often will see that one of the parents also has NF1 and may not even realize it.”

In order to meet criteria for an NF1 diagnosis, patients must meet two of the following criteria established in 1988 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), summarized below:

  • Six or more café-au-lait macules of a specific measured diameter depending on the age of the individual (over 5 mm in greatest diameter in prepubertal individuals and over 15 mm in greatest diameter in postpubertal individuals).
  • Two or more neurofibromas of any type or one plexiform neurofibroma.
  • Freckling in the axillary or inguinal regions.
  • Optic glioma.
  • Two or more iris Lisch nodules (iris hamartomas) observed on dilated eye exam.
  • A distinctive bony lesion (sphenoid dysplasia or tibial pseudarthrosis).
  • A first-degree relative (parent, sibling, or offspring) with a known diagnosis of NF1 as defined by the above criteria.

These NIH diagnostic criteria are extremely accurate in adults and children over the age of 5 years. A diagnosis of NF1 should be suspected in individuals who have any one of the above findings. Often if children are younger than 5 at the first evaluation, he or she may not yet have met the above criteria, but may do so after they reach school age. For this reason, visiting a geneticist on a regular basis is important in order to monitor and care for the patient.  Also, in certain cases in which a diagnosis is not completely clear, or there is concern for a different diagnosis, genetic testing via sequencing and deletion/duplication analysis of the NF1 gene is available and usually coordinated after genetic counseling occurs.

Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), a completely separate disorder, is even more rare than NF1.  A patient with NF1 is not at an increased risk compared to the general population to have NF2, especially if there is a negative family history.

Children with NF1 require care from multiple specialists including neurosurgery, neurology, oncology and orthopaedics, and at CHOC is seen at least annually by a geneticist, who aids in coordinating care and management of the condition. CHOC’s  multidisciplinary NF clinic involves all of the above specialists in the routine care of children with NF1 and other related disorders.

“We also can provide information to a patient and their families regarding the possibility to have further children in the family with NF1,” says Dr. Zadeh.

CHOC’s Neurofibromatosis Program has been treating children with NF1 for more than 30 years and annually cares for at least 150 children with NF1. The special program includes CHOC specialists currently involved in cutting edge clinical trials that are not available at many pediatric centers.

Learn more about the genetics program at CHOC.