Dr. Jamie Frediani joins Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s

A pediatric hematologist/oncologist Dr. Jamie Frediani has joined the growing team of innovative specialists at the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s.  Dr. Frediani looks forward to advancing CHOC’s leukemia and lymphoma programs, as well as the adolescent and young adult cancer program.

“The Hyundai Cancer Institute is experiencing an exciting time of immense growth, including creating new ways of delivering exceptional patient care, developing new treatments, expanding patient outreach and education, and enriching existing treatment teams,” says Dr. Frediani. “I am thrilled to be a part of this growth, and honored to join such a supportive team of experts.”

Pediatric hematologist/oncologist Dr. Jamie Frediani has joined the growing team of innovative specialists at the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s.

After graduating with high honors from University of California, Davis with a bachelor’s degree in microbiology, Dr. Frediani completed medical school at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.  Her residency and fellowship training were done at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), respectively.  Throughout her education and training, she assumed numerous leadership roles.  Most recently, she was chief fellow in the department of hematology/oncology at CHLA.  Aside from focusing on delivering excellent, family-centered care, Dr. Frediani would like to enhance the educational curriculum for medical students, residents and fellows, focusing on interactive and case-based learning experiences.

Dr. Frediani’s previous research includes examining the impact of the timing of central line placement in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia on infection and thrombosis rates; studying perioperative complications in patients with high-risk vascular malformations who underwent surgical or interventional radiology procedures around the site of their lesions; investigating the incidence and clinical course of varicella and herpes zoster in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pre and post-vaccination era; and studying the outcome of empiric treatment with cefepime versus ceftazidime in pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia.  The latter two studies were conducted in partnership with clinicians at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Her fellowship research in the laboratory of Dr. Muller Fabbri focused on exosomal communication between endothelial cells and cancer cells, leading to miRNA-mediated increased migration of the cancer cells. In addition to numerous abstracts, Dr. Frediani has published in Molecular Cancer, Archives of disease in childhood and Pediatric blood and cancer.

When not caring for patients, she enjoys trips to Disneyland, hiking, and reading, particularly science fiction/fantasy novels. She loves to travel, exploring the world and other cultures.

CHOC Children’s Participates in California Kids Cancer Comparison Initiative

Dr-Sender-and-Patient
Dr. Leonard Sender with patient at CHOC Children’s

The Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, under the direction of Dr. Leonard Sender, is a proud partner in the California Kids Cancer Comparison Initiative (CKCC), one of two demonstration projects recently selected by the new California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine, a public-private effort launched by Governor Edmund G. Brown, Jr. CHOC patients will become the first in the state to benefit from big data bioinformatics.

CKCC will give cancer clinicians access to a much broader pool of genetic data than has been readily available, including tumor sequencing data from children and adults around the world. Through the use of a social media platform that maintains the privacy and security of patients’ data, clinicians and patients can upload, analyze and communicate genomic information and associated data. In addition to CHOC, the project includes investigators from UC Irvine, UC San Francisco, Stanford University, USC, the Pacific Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Consortium, including UCLA and UC San Diego, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Translational Genomics Research Institute.

CHOC’s key contribution to CKCC centers on the clinical trial “Pilot project: Molecular Profiles of Refractory and Recurrent Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer.” Patients, whose cancer is either recurrent (returned after treatment) or refractory (not responding to treatment), have tumor and non-tumor specimens collected and sequenced to identify their molecular profiles. The information helps the care team personalize treatment plans, in addition to providing insight on why some cancers respond to therapy or recur despite treatment. As a result of CHOC’s participation in CKCC, these patients will become the first in California to benefit from big data comparisons based on the large cancer genomic datasets gathered and shared by the participating sites.

“The Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC made a commitment 10 years ago to invest time and resources in building a strong infrastructure that supports innovative genomic medicine techniques, and we’ve made tremendous progress. The era of precision medicine is here, and we cannot work in isolation. The richer the data, the richer our insight, helping advance clinical leads and new hope for patients and their families,” says Dr. Sender.

Bringing Fertility Preservation to the Forefront of Cancer Treatment

Efforts by the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s to ensure fertility preservation is top of Oncofertilitymind for adolescent and young adult oncology patients, as well as their care providers, were recently profiled by The Huffington Post.

“It is a fundamental right of any individual to be offered fertility preservation,” Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Cancer Institute told the online news site. “If we, as a society, believe in cancer survivorship, then what we need is for people to have a choice as to if they want to have children or not.”

Earlier this year, Dr. Sender co-hosted a workshop on oncofertility at Stupid Cancer’s CancerCon. The goal was to bring together leading experts on fertility preservation to discuss the need and path forward to make fertility preservation a topic of conversation with every AYA oncology patient undergoing treatment at every pediatric hospital in the country.

Read the full article in The Huffington Post.

Fertility Preservation ‘Central’ to Health, Wellness of AYA Patients

Oncology providers administer treatment to approximately 70,000 adolescentFertility Preservation Oncology and young adult patients (AYA) each year in the United States, three CHOC Children’s oncology staff members write in HemOnc Today.

Fertility preservation is central to the health and wellness of this population, defined as those aged 15 to 39 years.

As such, it is of great importance to distinguish which patients are at risk for infertility, understand what options — both established and experimental — are available to preserve fertility, and know how to advocate for and educate our patients about those options.

The focus of this article is on AYA patients with cancer, as this population is the most likely to be fertile. However, we understand and appreciate that women and men aged 40 years or older may desire to have a family following their cancer diagnosis and, if this is the case, the same options discussed below may be applicable to these patients.

The desire to have a family is prevalent in young cancer survivors. However, many patients may not raise the topic of fertility preservation at the time of diagnosis for a variety of reasons. They may be overwhelmed by and focused exclusively on the cancer diagnosis. They could be unaware that potential fertility loss may occur, or they might be concerned that pursuing fertility preservation will delay treatment.

Therefore, it is incumbent on the oncology team to properly educate patients whose fertility may be affected by their treatment.

Read the rest of this article from Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Center at CHOC Children’s; Julie Messina, an oncology physician assistant; and Keri Zabokrtsky, research program supervisor at the Hyundai Cancer Genomics Center, in HemOnc Today.