Protect Infants from Next Wave of Pertussis

The California Immunization Coalition, along with Dr. Jasjit Singh, director, infection prevention and epidemiology at CHOC Children’s, recommend the following pertussis guidelines for pediatricians and their patients.

As pertussis increases to peak levels every 3- 5 years, California is due for its next epidemic by 2019. Young infants remain at highest risk of hospitalization and death from pertussis. Since 2010, at least 2,800 California infants younger than four months of age have contracted pertussis. Most of these infants have been hospitalized, and at least 18 have died.

Please consider the following measures to protect infants against pertussis:

Prevention

  • Prenatal Interview – Promote Prenatal Immunization! Remind parents and prenatal providers to give prenatal Tdap vaccine to women between 27 and 36 weeks of gestation of each pregnancy, regardless of vaccination history. Encourage vaccination of household and caregivers.
  • Administer the first dose of DTaP vaccine to infants promptly at 6-8 weeks of age. A dose as early as 6 weeks will help protect infants sooner if their mothers did not receive Tdap during pregnancy. Complete the DTaP series without delay.
  • Maternal immunization is associated with infant survival. Receipt of Tdap by mothers between weeks 27 and 36 of pregnancy and receipt of DTaP by infants prior to illness greatly reduce the risk of death from pertussis.

Presentation

Pertussis should be considered in any infant without a documented fever who presents with coryza, cough (especially paroxysmal), apnea, gagging, or post-tussive emesis.

Suspect pertussis in adolescents and adults with prolonged cough, and test and treat promptly to prevent transmission to infants.

Testing

Obtain nasopharyngeal swabs for pertussis PCR testing to confirm the diagnosis. Additional guidance is at www.cdc.gov/pertussis/clinical/diagnostic-testing/specimen-collection.html.

  • In infants, check white blood cell counts with differential – a leukemoid reaction is associated with life-threatening pertussis. A WBC count greater than 10,000 cells/mm3 with ˃50% lymphocytes should be repeated 24 hours later; increasing lymphocytosis should prompt additional monitoring and treatment. A WBC of >20,000 cells/mm3 with >50% lymphocytosis should be considered as a very strong indication that the infant has pertussis.

Treatment

Azithromycin (10mg/kg/day in a single dose for five days) for infants less than 6 months of age.

Empiric treatment is appropriate while awaiting the results of PCR testing.

Additional clinical guidance and access to consultation can be found at eziz.org/assets/docs/Pertussis-YoungInfants2011.pdf.

Further information, California case counts, and clinical guidance for pertussis can be found here.

 

Nasal Flu Vaccine Not Recommended This Season – What Patients and Families Should Know

An advisory committee of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently recommended that the nasal spray influenza vaccine not be used this upcoming flu season. In this Q&A, Dr. Jasjit Singh, medical director of infection prevention and control at CHOC Children’s, offers an explanation for your patients and their families.

Q: What does this mean for influenza vaccine recommendations for the upcoming flu season?

A: All individuals over the age of 6 months are recommended to get the influenza vaccine, and that will continue to be the case.  However, for this season at least, the nasal flu vaccine is not an option. Therefore, parents will need to plan for their children to get the flu shot this upcoming season.

Jasjit Singh, M.D.
Jasjit Singh, M.D.

Q: How does the standard flu shot differ from the nasal spray version in terms of composition and effectiveness?

A: Both the flu shot and the nasal spray contain the anticipated predominant circulating strains of influenza every year, but the nasal spray strains are made of weakened live virus while the flu shot is made of inactivated viral components. The CDC reviewed data from this past season that suggested that the nasal spray did not perform as well as it had in the past.

Q: Besides ensuring their children get a flu shot, what else can parents do to help prevent the flu?

A: In addition to ensuring their child is vaccinated against the flu every year, there are many things parents and other caregivers can do to help prevent the flu. Use proper hand-washing techniques, use respiratory etiquette, and stay home from work or school if you are sick with the flu, to prevent spreading it to others.

Q: What do you anticipate will be parents’ reactions to this recommendation? Is there anything else you’d like them to know? Is there anything else you’d like to share with parents about the importance of vaccinations?

A:  Vaccinations are one of the most effective public health measures that have been developed and they save thousands of lives each year. Influenza vaccinations are important because young children can get quite sick from the flu, and some even require hospitalization. Every year there are pediatric deaths in the U.S. due to influenza, about half of which occur in normal healthy children. Children can pass influenza on to the elderly or other fragile members of our community. It’s important for adults to get the flu shot too, particularly those who are caring for young children. Even though the nasal spray is not an option for vaccinating this particular season, it is still important to have your child vaccinated for this year.