Talking to children after traumatic events: Six resources to share with families

Helping children cope through the aftermath of a traumatic event can be difficult.

Acts of mass violence bring up widespread worry, anxiety, uncertainty and trauma, and it can be overwhelming for parents to know where to start when talking to kids about it.

People often turn to healthcare providers for advice about the best ways to approach tough conversations with young people. The following is a list of helpful resources you can share with families about coping with the complicated feelings after a traumatic event.

Guidelines for helping youth after the recent shootings

This fact sheet by The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) offers guardians tips about helping children after an act of mass violence. It is presented in both English and Spanish versions.

For teens: coping after mass violence

Another NCTSN resource, this handout is tailored to parents of teens and includes information for adolescents on self-care after trauma.

American Psychological Association response to mass shootings in Texas, Ohio

American Psychological Association President Rosie Phillips Davis, PhD, offers an official statement, as well as a helpful list of resources, in the aftermath of mass gun violence.

How to help your child navigate the emotional aftermath of a traumatic event

This CHOC Children’s Blog post presents the five E’s, a clear series of steps parents and guardians can follow when talking to children, alongside a list of additional resources.

Talking to Children About Violence: Tips for Parents and Teachers

The National Association of School Psychologists offers points to emphasize when talking to kids of all ages about violence. Companion flyers are also offered in English, Spanish, Korean, Vietnamese, French, Amharic, Chinese, Portuguese, Somali, Arabic and Kurdish.

Should you talk to young children about tragic events?

This CHOC Children’s Blog post breaks down factors parents should consider before talking to their kid(s) about tragedy, including appropriate approaches by age group.