CHOC Experts to Speak at International Hydrocephalus Conference

Two CHOC Children’s pediatric neurology experts will speak at an upcoming conference featuring the latest education on hydrocephalus.

Including internationally recognized medical professionals and researchers, HA Connect – National Conference on Hydrocephalus, held June 28-30 in Newport Beach, will address the medical, educational and social complexities of living with hydrocephalus through interactive discussions, workshops and hands-on exhibits.  Over 500 people are expected to attend the international conference.

Dr. Michael Muhonen

Dr. Michael Muhonen, board-certified neurosurgeon, division chief of neurosurgery and medical director, CHOC Neuroscience Institute, will present a lecture on the anatomy of the brain, with a focus on the cerebral ventricles, cerebral spinal fluid physiology and hydrocephalus.

On the second day of the conference, Dr. Muhonen and Dr. Anjalee Galion, board-certified pediatric neurologist and associate director of the CHOC Sleep Lab, will present on headaches and current management. Their lectures will be specifically focused on the etilogy and treatment of headaches in patients with hydrocephalus, pseudotumor cerebrii, and other brain pathology.

Dr. Anjalee Galion

All CHOC professionals and employees are invited to attend.  The CHOC Neuroscience Institute is offering assistance with the cost of registration. For details, email Rhonda Long, director, CHOC Neuroscience Institute at rlong@choc.org.

Learn more about HA Connect – 2018 National Conference on Hydrocephalus.

What CHOC Physicians are Grateful for this Thanksgiving

As Thanksgiving approaches, CHOC Children’s physicians explain what they’ll consider when giving thanks this holiday.

 

“CHOC has provided me with lifelDr. Neda Zadehong blessings. I am grateful to have grown up at and with this hospital, from the initial CHOC Tower to the current Bill Holmes Tower, through pediatric residency training and beyond.  To now be a member of such a remarkable team of providers — including our nurses and support staff — is both humbling and inspiring. Every day, I am especially thankful for the families who cross our threshold, and entrust the care of their most precious children to us. With continued commitment and dedication toward the health and well-being of our children, the future will be brighter than any of us can imagine.”
– Dr. Neda Zadeh, genetics

 

Dr. Kenneth Grant

 

 

“I am thankful to be working for an organization that creates an environment where our patients become our family. I am also grateful that CHOC Children’s has the foresight to invest in the innovative ideas we have to improve the health care we provide.”
 – Dr. Kenneth Grant, gastroenterology

 

 

 

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“I am thankful for the opportunity with be partnered with an excellent children’s hospital. I am also thankful for the pleasure of working with other positive people who provide outstanding care to the children of Orange County. Together, we work to improve the care and services we deliver to our most important resource — our children.”
– Dr. Daniel Mackey, pediatrics

 

 

 

 

Dr. Lilbeth Torno

“I am grateful for the incredible team we have in oncology, inlcuding   doctors, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, the research team, members of ancillary services, our inpatient, clinic and OPI staff, administrative support, and other subspecialists, who all have great minds and compassionate hearts, and walk the difficult cancer journey with our patients and their families. I am humbled to be with such great company here at CHOC, who care deeply for children.”
– Dr. Lilibeth Torno, oncology

 

 

 

goodman_tg“I am most grateful to the people behind the scenes at the hospital who do all the invisible jobs that are so important to keep CHOC Children’s running: the housekeepers, lab and x-ray technologists, bio-medical engineers, pharmacy technicians, scrub technicians, security guards and maintenance staff that work tirelessly, 24-hours a day.”
– Dr. Gary Goodman, critical care

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. William Loudon

“I am most thankful for the ability to practice alongside of the caring and professional staff and physicians at CHOC, who all share the common goal of caring for children. Working together, we are able to tackle incredibly complex and varied problems that present in the amazingly diverse population of children that we serve.”
Dr. William Loudon, neurosurgery

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I am thankDr. Amy Harrisonful for so many things here at CHOC. I feel truly blessed every day to have found a professional community of like-minded caregivers who share a passion and dedication for continued improvement in the care we provide. I am also so grateful for the opportunity to meet and care for such incredibly courageous patients and to become a part of their families. Finally, I am thankful to my teams within the pulmonary division, the Cystic Fibrosis Center and the muscular dystrophy clinics for their selfless care of our patients. I wish our entire community a healthy and happy holiday season.”
Dr. Amy Harrison, pulmonology

 

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“I’m thankful for the opportunity to serve my patients and families, and to help them secure bright futures through CHOC’s world-class care. I am also so grateful to work among a team that is steadfastly committed to the health and well-being of children in our community and beyond. “
Dr. Mary Zupanc, neurology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

aminian

“I am thankful for the platform CHOC has given us to provide service to a community that inspires me daily. I am humbled to just be part of it all.”
Dr. Afshin Aminian, orthopaedics

ROSA Robot Assists in CHOC Patient’s Successful Epilepsy Surgery

Five-year-old Ian Higginbotham recently enjoyed his best summer yet.  He experienced his first family vacation. He learned to swim and ride a bike. He got himself ready for kindergarten.  These are milestones most kids and parents, alike, eagerly welcome.  But there was a time when Ian’s parents weren’t certain their son, who was born seemingly healthy, would enjoy such happy pastimes.

Ian began talking and walking in his sleep as a toddler.  When the episodes, including night terrors, increased in frequency and severity, his mom Lisa made an appointment with the pediatrician.  One day, Lisa knew something just wasn’t right and didn’t want to wait for the appointment to get Ian checked out.  She and her husband Derek took him to the Julia and George Argyros Emergency Department at CHOC Children’s Hospital.  To her surprise, doctors diagnosed her son with epilepsy.    Ian’s “sleepwalking” and “night terrors” were actually seizures.

The family was referred to CHOC’s comprehensive epilepsy program.  A national leader in pediatric epilepsy care, CHOC’s comprehensive epilepsy program offers cutting-edge diagnostics, innovative medical approaches and advanced surgical interventions.  CHOC was the first children’s hospital in the state to be named a Level 4 epilepsy center by the National Association of Epilepsy Centers, signifying the highest-level medical and surgical evaluation and treatment for patients with complex epilepsy.

CHOC Children's

Ian’s neurologist Dr. Andrew Mower suspected he was experiencing complex partial seizures, which was confirmed by video EEG monitoring.  Complex partial seizures start in a small area of the temporal or frontal lobe of the brain, and quickly involve the areas of the brain affecting alertness and awareness.  The pattern of Ian’s seizures suggested they were originating from the right frontal lobe.  Dr. Mower knew Ian and his family were in for a tough journey.

“I really don’t think the general public understands the impact epilepsy has on a child and his family.  Its effects are multifaceted and extensive.  Our team’s goal is to reduce or eliminate our patients’ seizures, helping improve their quality of life,” explains Dr. Mower, who placed Ian on a series of medications.

The medications reduced Ian’s seizures, but did not control them.  Dr. Mower was concerned about the seizures affecting Ian’s development, and presented his case to the epilepsy team.   The multidisciplinary team agreed Ian was a candidate for epilepsy surgery.  For children who fail at least two medications, surgery may be considered early in treatment versus as a last resort.  Surgery can result in an improvement in seizure control, quality of life, and prevent permanent brain damage.  Ian’s surgery was going to be performed by CHOC neurosurgeon Dr. Joffre Olaya.

While the thought of surgery was frightening to Lisa and her husband, they were confident in the team and comforted to know their son was going to benefit from innovative technology, like the ROSA™ Robot. Considered one of the most advanced robotized surgical assistants, ROSA includes a computer system and a robotic arm.  The computer system offers 3D brain mapping to aid surgeons in locating the exact areas they need to reach and planning the best surgical paths.  The robotic arm is a minimally invasive surgical tool that improves accuracy and significantly reduces surgery/anesthesia time.

Dr. Olaya used ROSA to accurately place electrodes in the area of Ian’s brain suspected to be the source of his seizures.  By using the robot, Dr. Olaya avoided performing a craniotomy.

“ROSA is an amazing tool that yields many benefits for our patients, including less time under anesthesia in the operating room.  It reduces blood loss and risk of infections.  Patients tend to recover faster than they would if they had craniotomy,” says Dr. Olaya.

Lisa was amazed at the outcome. “I couldn’t believe how great Ian looked after the placements of the electrodes with ROSA.  He wasn’t in any pain, there was no swelling.  It was wonderful!”

She and her husband were also amazed at how well Ian did following his epilepsy surgery.

“We got our boy back,” says Lisa. “There were no more side effects from medication and, more importantly, no more seizures!  He started developing again and doing all the things a child his age should do.”

Ian’s care team isn’t surprised by his recovery.

“Children are resilient, and their brains are no different.  In fact, the plasticity of a young brain allows it to adapt to changes and heal more easily than an adult brain,” explains Dr. Mower.

Learning to ride a bike and swim were among the first of many milestones Ian quickly reached following surgery.  He enjoys playing with his younger brother and his friends.  And, whether inspired by his experience with ROSA or not, Ian loves robots.