Dr. Leonard Sender Discusses Genomic Cancer Research

Genomic cancer treatment examines a patient’s genomes to reveal individualized treatment to best battle cancer, Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, tells “American Health Journal.”

Using this method, scientists for the first time can devise science-directed medicine, rather than evidence-based medicine, Dr. Sender says.

Learn more about genomic cancer research in “American Health Journal,” a television program that airs on PBS and other national network affiliates that reach more than 30 million households.

Each 30-minute episode features six segments with a diverse range of medical specialists discussing a full spectrum of health topics. For more information, visit www.discoverhealth.tv.

Leonard Sender, M.D., received his medical education in South Africa and completed his pediatrics internship and residency at UC Irvine Medical Center. His pediatrics hematology/oncology subspecialty training included Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles.

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CHOC’s AYA Cancer Efforts Earn National Attention

The adolescent and young adult cancer movement has helped define patients by age rather than disease and raise awareness of the population’s unique needs, Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, tells “The Huffington Post.”

Dr. Sender’s and CHOC’s leadership role in the adolescent and young adult cancer movement were prominently featured recently on the popular online news site that covers a range of topics such as health care, technology, business, politics and entertainment.

The three-part series was centered on the recent Society of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (SAYAO) conference held in partnership with CHOC’s Cancer Institute.

The first piece featured an interview with Dr. Sender who is also the director of the Cancer Institute’s adolescent and young adult program and developed SAYAO. Dr. Sender discussed the movement’s achievements, its ongoing priorities and goals, as well as its future.

“I believe the movement as a whole is going to help define four big age groups of people getting cancers, and that we are going to start addressing cancer in terms of what it means for those age groups,” he said. “So, what does it mean for a geriatric patient who is different from an adult who is different from an AYA who is different from a pediatric patient?”

CHOCThe series’ second installment, “Advances in the Young Adult Cancer Movement: Why SAYAO Is a Big Deal,” discussed the origins of SAYAO and its efforts to create an academic space for medical professionals to discuss and educate one another on the specific topics relevant to this patient population.

The article also provided an overview of the two-day conference held in October.

The series’ third piece, “New Innovation in the AYA Cancer Movement: The Future is Here,” detailed new technology discussed at the conference that could factor in future treatment of adolescents and young adults with cancer.

For example, My Bridge 4 Life, an organization whose products use technology to help people improve healthcare management, developed the Infusionarium at CHOC’s Cancer Institute. The Infusionarium, which ran as a pilot in 2013, incorporated sensory elements and media to help combat the isolation, boredom and stress often felt by patients during cancer treatment.

Also, My Bridge 4 Life and SeventyK announced a new video survival guide and eBook for adolescents and young adults with cancer.