In the Spotlight: Kelly Davis, M.D.

A board-certified physician in pediatrics and sports medicine has recently joined the CHOC Children’s Orthopaedic Institute. Dr. Kelly Davis specializes in sports injuries, injury prevention, concussion management and advanced musculoskeletal ultrasound medicine for children, adolescents and young adults. Among the most common diagnoses she sees include overuse injuries and knee pain in athletes of all ages who play a variety of sports.

Her passion for helping young athletes comes from her own experience growing up playing sports. She played tennis, soccer, basketball, and also swam and water skied. She continues to play competitive tennis today and thanks her mom, a huge tennis enthusiast, for getting her into the sport.

“My mom played in college and has been my coach my whole life. I think what I love about tennis so much is that no matter your age or skill level, there is always someone you can play with and it is a great way to meet new people,” she says.

Dr. Davis completed her undergraduate studies at the University of California, San Diego, followed by medical school at Temple University School of Medicine, in Philadelphia. After graduation, she completed a pediatric residency at CHOC, and stayed an additional year to serve as chief resident. She completed a fellowship in pediatric primary care sports medicine at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee.

During her time at Vanderbilt University, she served as a team physician for a high school and for several collegiate teams including football, baseball, cross country, track and field, tennis and soccer. Additionally, she was a team physician for the Nashville Sounds, a minor league baseball team.

Today, she continues to have the same commitment and enthusiasm for her patients.

“These kids have a certain drive. They’re really motivated and fun to work with,” she explains. “I also know what it’s like to sustain an injury, put in the rehab work and come back to the sport you love.”

Her patient care philosophy is straightforward: She treats each patient and their family as she would want one of her own family members to be treated. As a recent, first-time mom, she has gained an added appreciation for her patients’ parents and their questions or concerns, she says.

“I’m available as a resource for our community providers as well,” Dr. Davis adds. “If they have any concerns or questions, they can reach out to me or a member of my team anytime.”

In her spare time, Dr. Davis loves spending time with her husband and their baby boy. She also enjoys playing soccer and tennis, hiking, camping and exploring the outdoors.

To contact Dr. Davis, please call 714-633-2111.

Learn more about the CHOC Children’s Orthopaedic Institute.

Meet Dr. Charles Golden

CHOC Children’s wants community providers to get to know its physicians. Today, meet Dr. Charles Golden, a board-certified pediatrician and executive medical director, Primary Care Network, CHOC Children’s.

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology at University of California, Riverside. After completing my undergraduate studies, I attended Western University of Health Sciences College of Allied Health and earned a certificate as a physician assistant. I worked at Southern Orange County Pediatric Associates (SOCPA) as a physician assistant until I started medical school at Western University of Health Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, in Pomona. I completed my internship and residency, including a year as chief resident, at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles.

Q: How long have you been at CHOC?

A: Just over a year.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: I love all aspects of clinical medicine, but get energized when I have the opportunity to teach. I believe that every encounter with a patient is an opportunity to teach them something about the body and explain why we make the decisions that we do in medicine. I’m also passionate about teaching medical students and residents, as they continually challenge me to stay up to date with new research. I love the feeling I get from contributing to the development of their careers as physicians.

Q: Are there any new programs or developments within CHOC’s Primary Care Network?

A: In the near future, we plan to open an after-hours clinic for the entire community. By the end of summer, we’re planning on implementing a single electronic health record (EHR) through Cerner for all our primary care offices so that all of our providers chart on patients in the same record, and a patient’s medical information can securely be available to whoever they see in our group. This will continue to improve communications within the practices.

We’re also growing our comprehensive adolescent medicine services. We will be hiring another adolescent medicine specialist to address this unique, complex patient population. Additionally, we’re working on the use of digital vision screening devices to look for problems with vision in children younger than 4 years old, who are often too young to read a visual acuity chart.

In addition, we’re working closely with CHOC’s chief psychologist, Dr. Heather Huszti and her team to provide a mental health professional in each of our primary care offices to help the medical team screen for and address mental health issues. This is a component of CHOC’s mental health initiative, including the mental health inpatient center opening this spring.

Q: What would you like specialists to know about primary care at CHOC?

A: I would want the specialists to know about the high-quality care that our physicians provide on a daily basis, as well as the breadth of our network – from central and north Orange County to the most southern part of the county in San Clemente – and the broad diversity of the patients that we care for.

I’d also like them to know that they can feel comfortable collaborating with our pediatricians, and that they can count on us to provide evidence based care to our patients, consistent with what we know their divisions to do. Lastly, I’d want them to see CHOC primary care as a trusted partner in our health system, where we are keeping children healthy through regular examinations, screening, education and integration, and strive to treat our patients and their families holistically rather than simply by disease process.

Q: What would you like patients and families to know about your division at CHOC?

A: For many people, bringing your child to seek medical care can be a stressful event. There are many sources of information out there regarding children’s health, and in some cases those sources may contribute to more confusion and anxiety. I would like patients and families to know that when they choose a CHOC pediatric provider, they can trust that the care being delivered is state of the art, up to date and based on clinical and scientific evidence, combined with years of expertise. They will be greeted by empathic staff who are skilled in making children feel comfortable, and providers who are not only skilled at diagnostics, but bring a warm and compassionate touch to the visit.

Further, our pediatricians are partners with our specialists, and through this partnership they share knowledge, collaborate in patient care, and help to create a sense of calm for patients and their families.

Q: What inspires you about the care being delivered at CHOC?

A: Every day pediatricians, pediatric specialists, nursing staff, technicians and so many other professionals come to CHOC to make a difference in the lives of children in need. It’s a calling, and they’re passionate about it. You can feel it when you walk through the door, whether it’s from the smiles and greetings from the folks at the information desk, or when you see a security guard assist a family. Perhaps it’s when you see an associate go out of their way to offer hospitality to a random person in an elevator, or the cutting edge surgical and medical treatments that are happening every day. To try to answer what inspires me most about the care being delivered by CHOC would do a disservice to every little thing that occurs on our campus that makes CHOC a special place. I’m incredibly proud to be a part of it!

Q: Why did you decide to become a doctor?

A: I fell in love with science as a teenager. Around the same time, my father had a heart attack. I remember going to the hospital and learning about his heart and how the medicine was working to provide care for him. I was fascinated by it all and never looked back.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A: I would probably be a general contractor. I’ve always enjoyed working with my hands.

Q: What do you like to do in your spare time?

A: I love spending time with my wife and children. I also enjoy cycling and mountain biking, and being involved in my kids’ sports.

To refer a patient, please call 1-855-212-6740.

Learn more about CHOC Children’s Primary Care Network.

 

Dr. Hoang Nguyen Appointed Medical Director, CHOC Children’s Mental Health Inpatient Center

A psychiatrist with a long history of service in Orange County, Dr. Hoang “Wayne” Nguyen has been appointed medical director of the CHOC Children’s Mental Health Inpatient Center. He will also serve as medical director, child and adolescent psychiatry and chair of the psychiatry section of CHOC’s medical staff.

Dr. Nguyen earned his medical degree at Texas A&M University Health Sciences Center, followed by additional training at University of California, Irvine and University of Utah Health Science Center, where he served as chief resident. He is a diplomate with the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in child/adolescent psychiatry and general psychiatry, as well as being board certified in psychosomatic medicine.

Dr. Hoang “Wayne” Nguyen, medical director, CHOC Children’s Mental Health Inpatient Center

In addition to seeing patients in private practice, Dr. Nguyen has been a consulting psychiatrist for Fairview Development Center. There, he also served as chief of medical staff for five years. He was director of undergraduate medical education for psychiatry at University of California, Irvine, where he still holds an appointment as associate clinical professor.

Having joined CHOC’s medical staff in 2000, Dr. Nguyen has been integrally involved in the development of the Center. When it opens in April 2018, the 12,000-square foot, 18-bed facility will be the only one in Orange County to treat patients younger than 12. It is the only facility in California to offer all private rooms, as well as an option for parents to stay overnight with their children, as appropriate.

“I am extremely proud of CHOC’s commitment to creating a mental health system of care, including the Center as its centerpiece,” says Dr. Nguyen. “A child’s mental health is as important as physical health, and we are committed to making sure children and adolescents with mental illnesses receive high quality services without stigma or barriers to access.”

With Dr. Nguyen as its medical director, the Center will serve patients ages 3 to 17, with specialty programming available to children 12 and younger. Patients will participate in therapeutic programming seven days a week, which is unique among inpatient facilities. During their stay, typically five to seven days, patients will also have access to medical specialists if assessments suggest a relationship between the mental health condition and an underlying health issue.

CHOC’s broad and robust pediatric system of mental health care has been built to facilitate early diagnosis, intervention and treatment of pediatric mental health problems.

The system’s components include the ASPIRE® (After School Program Interventions and Resiliency Education) Intensive Outpatient Program at CHOC Children’s, designed to prevent psychiatric hospitalization and re-admission; mental health screenings in primary and specialty care settings; pediatric mental health training for community health care providers, school personnel and therapists; and a co-occurring clinic for patients with mental health challenges complicated by physical illnesses.

Other aspects include mental health triage at the Julia and George Argyros Emergency Department at CHOC Children’s Hospital; an early childhood mental health initiative set to begin in spring 2018 that is aimed at reducing behavior-related suspensions from child care and preschool settings; and faith community partnerships.

Learn more about CHOC’s mental health services.

Longtime CHOC Pediatrician Retires

Dr. Michael Shannon can’t walk through the lobby of Sea View Pediatrics without at least one parent coming in for a hug.

After nearly 45 years in pediatric health care in Orange County, he’s earned more than a few fans – and the respect is mutual.

“Much of what a pediatrician learns is after training,” Dr. Shannon says.

Bring on the hugs though: At the end of this month, the 73-year-old will retire, completing a career that has spanned more than four decades and thousands of patients.

Born in Kansas, Dr. Shannon crisscrossed the country as a youth and young adult before ultimately attending medical school at Northwestern University in Illinois.

Dr. Shannon pursued a career in medicine following a childhood with frequent visits to doctor’s offices.

“I had bad allergies as a kid, an early tonsillectomy, a hernia at 7, appendicitis and asthma,” he says. “I was in the doctor’s office quite a bit. My parents seemed to like him, so I thought that would be a good thing to do.”

When it came to choosing his specialty, Dr. Shannon settled on pediatrics because he enjoyed children’s innocent natures.

“I always liked kids. Children don’t judge you, and their charts were really thin,” he says with a laugh.

When it came time to a residency and internship, Dr. Shannon and his wife, who’d long grown tired of cold Midwestern winters, headed west to California.

Ultimately, the pair settled in Orange County, where Dr. Shannon began a private pediatrics practice in July 1973. He practiced near Mission Hospital until 1995, when he joined Sea View Pediatrics, now a part of the CHOC Children’s Network.

Over more than four decades of practice, Dr. Shannon has treated thousands of Orange County children.

Steve Concialdi and Dr. Shannon

“I remember him being a cool doctor,” says Steve Concialdi, a patient of Dr. Shannon’s as a child and who is now a captain with the Orange County Fire Authority. “He was hip and he was fun.”

The doctor reached an icon status for a young Steve when he was about 10. He’d been battling a cold and his mother thought he should skip a school whale watching trip. After hearing Dr. Shannon’s opinion, mom Bonnie was swayed and Steve went on the trip.

“I went and I had a blast,” he says. “I ended up throwing up, but that’s because I got sea sick. But I just remember as little boy, what a cool doctor he was. We saw Dr. Shannon for years.”

And so, when Steve and his sister, Carrie, started their own families, Dr. Shannon was a clear choice for their children’s pediatrician – and Bonnie agreed.

“I told them, you’ve got to go to Dr. Shannon,” she said. “I wouldn’t stand for anyone else. I went to their first appointments too. I wanted to see Dr. Shannon because I missed him.”

The Concialdis are just one of many families in Orange County that have had generations of children see Dr. Shannon. The phenomenon is a testimony to Dr. Shannon’s long career and strong relationships with his patients and families.

Dr. Shannon with Gracie Concialdi at her first appointment; her father, Steve Concialdi; grandmother, Bonnie; and her brother, Andy Concialdi.

And that bond was never more evident than in March 2011, when he was seriously injured in a car accident. His patients and families – past and present – showed an outpouring of concern for him during a long recovery period.

The swell of support clarified for Dr. Shannon the impact his career had made on patients and families.

“The accident made me feel even more than ever before that I didn’t want anything happening to my babies,” he says of his patients.

And now, nearly seven years later, Dr. Shannon says he’s ready to hang up his stethoscope and entrust the care of his babies to the other Seaview physicians.

Dr. Shannon plans to spend his retirement traveling and focusing on his grandchildren. His future trips include travel to Louisville, Ky., to visit his daughter, Vanessa, and Ireland and Spain in 2018.

 

Five Tips to Help Doctors De-Stress

By Dr. Carla Weis

 As physicians, we put the health and well-being of others before our own.   The passion to help others is what inspired us to pursue the journey into modern medicine. Noble work? Absolutely. Work that justifies destroying our own physical health and perhaps soul? No.

Dr. Carla Weis, board-certified neonatologist and member of CHOC Children’s Specialists.

How can we truly serve others, if we don’t take care of ourselves? Put your own oxygen mask on first, right? For most healthcare professionals, this is easier said than done. But I ask you, how can we be fully present for our patients’ healing and provide them with the best possible outcomes, if we ignore our own spirit and soul?

The answer is quite simple: “Physician, health thyself.” How? First, examine yourself and how you live. It’s hard to take this first step, however, when we feel so much stress. In fact, we often accept stress as a way of life. It doesn’t have to be that way. Here are a few tips to find relief from stress.

  1. De-clutter

De-cluttering is often touted as an important step in de-stressing, and in fact, it is a huge part of facilitating a greater sense of inner peace. Make a commitment to yourself that over the course of several months you will get rid of all that stuff in your home that doesn’t add joy to your life.  Consider renting a large bin or dumpster, have it delivered to your driveway or the front of your house, and just start tossing stuff.  You’ll be amazed at how fast it fills up and how much of a difference there is in your sense of calmness and inner peace.  A good rule of thumb is to keep only what you need or love.  We keep so many things that are simply carrying an emotional attachment for us, but are unnecessary and drag us down on many levels.

I highly recommend reading The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo.

2.  Meditation

Meditation is one of those things we know would be good to do, and maybe even recommend it to our patients, but it will always hold the lowest position on our list of priorities. Why is that?  Well, we just don’t have the time, of course.  That’s the funny thing about meditating.  It takes time and that’s exactly what we don’t have enough of!

Years ago, I joined a gym and took advantage of the free consultation with a personal trainer. She asked me what my fitness goals were. I thought about how uncomfortable it was to do cardio and I wanted to be more comfortable with cardio.   I said, “I’d like to be more fit on a cardiovascular level.” She said, “Ok, add 20 minutes of cardio training to every workout.”

I was silently aghast. I didn’t say I wanted to do more cardio.  I just wanted to be better at it.  And so, I learned a very poignant lesson. The only way to become better or more comfortable at doing something is to do more of it.  If you would like to have more inner peace in your life, more quiet time, guess what? You must bring more inner peace and quiet time into your life.

Start with just five or 10 minutes a day. Find a time that works best for you.  For me, it’s first thing in the morning before I’m even really awake.  For others, it’s at night before sleep.  And for some, it’s both.  You choose.  Just set the timer on your phone and sit quietly with your eyes closed, focusing on your breath and relaxing your body with each breath.  Bring your attention to your body inwardly.  It’s useful to simply practice the art of noticing any distracting thoughts as they come in and then bringing your attention back to your breath and the present.  You may find that this is the best part of your day!

3. Love yourself more

We take care of others, but how good are we at taking care of ourselves? Pay attention to the inner dialogue within your mind as you go about your day.  Do you talk nicely to yourself?  Often, we speak quite harshly to ourselves and aren’t even aware of it.  Take moments during the day to be aware of your inner dialogue and then redirect the way you speak to yourself in your mind.  Re-train yourself to talk lovingly to and supportive of yourself.  Realize that the most important person to give and show your love to, is yourself.  From there, you will have so much more love to share with others. “Physician, heal thyself!”

4. Invest in a stress -reduction program

Invest in a stress reduction program. I highly recommend receiving a stress-reducing modality called a Life Activation, where you will receive a greater connection to your spirit within.

5. Bring spirituality into your life

What does this really mean? Are we talking about God?  Religion? A higher power?  Don’t we often think of spirituality as something for mystics and philosophy buffs to ponder?

Spirituality gets lumped into those areas of our lives that we’d love to pay more attention to at some point — when we have more time. When is that?  No doubt, life is busy.  But the truth about spirituality is that it’s part of who we are.  It’s not about worshipping a God in the sky or giving our power away to any religious figure.   Maybe it’s something we’ve allocated only to one day a week.  And, of course, as physicians, we often work on that day, so we get a pass from spirituality, right?

I suggest starting to explore what spirituality means to you. There’s no right answer and in fact, the answers are infinite!  Because we are infinite!

Dr. Carla Weis is a board-certified neonatologist and member of CHOC Children’s Specialists. She practices primarily in the neonatal intensive care unit at Hoag Hospital Newport Beach.  She received her medical degree from Temple University in Philadelphia, and completed her fellowship in neonatal-perinatal medicine at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP).  Her metaphysical/spiritual training has been with the Modern Mystery School, International.  Her primary focus is supporting healthcare workers to find balance in their lives, and guiding others to explore life concepts including and beyond the physical. 

Continue to follow the blog for more helpful tips from Dr. Weis.