Meet Dr. Jonathan Auth

CHOC Children’s wants its medical staff and patients to get to know its growing team of physicians, including primary and specialty care providers. Today, meet one of our pediatricians Dr. Jonathan Auth.   After graduating from USC Keck School of Medicine, he completed his residency at UCLA, for which he served as chief resident.  He’s been on the CHOC medical staff for seven years.

Dr. Jonathan Auth, CHOC Children’s pediatrician

Q: What are your clinical interests?

A: I am especially interested in newborn care.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: I see a lot of patients with fevers, viral upper respiratory infections, conjunctivitis, gastroenteritis, asthma, allergy, rhinitis, rashes and eczema. I also provide well child care.

Q: When did you decide to become a pediatrician?

A: Growing up in a large family with seven brothers and sisters, I always enjoyed being around children. As a young child, I enjoyed taking things apart and putting them back together.  Combining my love for fixing things and my personality as a people person, it became clear to me in high school that I was called into a life of medicine.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what you be and why?

A: A teacher. So much of what I do every day is teaching and explaining how the body works.  I love having the answer and being able to see the look of understanding develop on another person’s face as he or she comprehends a concept for the first time.

Q: What are your hobbies and interests outside of medicine?

A: I enjoy gardening, woodworking, food, wine and the cinema.

Q: What’s the funniest thing a patient said to you?

A: Children really do view the world differently. Referencing my patients’ charts during office visits, I will frequently acknowledge recent birthdays.  Patients are often in awe, wondering how I knew it was their birthdays.

Dr. Auth and his colleagues at Sea View Pediatrics, are part of the CHOC Children’s Primary Care Network. You can reach him at 949- 951-5437.

Meet Dr. Reshmi Basu

CHOC Children’s wants its medical staff and patients to get to know its growing team of physicians, including primary and specialty care providers. Today, meet one of our pediatricians Dr. Reshmi Basu.   Following medical school at University of California, San Diego, she completed her residency at CHOC. She’s been a member of the CHOC medical staff for eight years.

What are your clinical interests?

I am especially interested in asthma, sleep issues in children (infants through adolescents), and helping new mothers breastfeed.

Are you involved in any research?

I am a physician leader for the American Academy of Pediatrics, Chapter Quality Network U.S. Immunization Project. Practices here in Orange County and across the nation are participating in the project to improve vaccination rates for children two years and younger.

What are your most common diagnoses?

In our practice, we see a lot of patients with viral respiratory illnesses, ear infections, abdominal pain, asthma, allergies, eczema and headaches. We also spend much of our time on routine well checks for infants, teens and young adults. These appointments are important for keeping children current on vaccinations, and making sure they are growing and developing normally. We work hard to address parents’ concerns during these visits, as well.

What inspires you most about the care being delivered at CHOC?

I am proud to be a CHOC Children’s provider because CHOC undoubtedly provides the highest quality of care for patients and families. One of my patients was being treated for cancer during the holidays. Not only did CHOC make sure she received the most advanced medical care, the hospital’s child life team did everything they could to bring the holidays to her. Her room was filled with inspirational banners, Christmas lights and even beautiful new bedding on her hospital bed.

When did you decide to become a pediatrician?

I decided to become a pediatrician after my pediatrics rotation in medical school. I had always liked working with children, and was already drawn to pediatrics after volunteering at CHOC Children’s at Mission Hospital. (I grew up in Mission Viejo.) As a volunteer, I enjoyed spending time at the hospital, whether it was holding the babies or coloring with children. After my pediatrics rotation, though, I realized that children need advocates to fight for them, and that is something I wanted to do. My goal is to help all my patients grow and thrive to become healthy, successful adults.

If you weren’t a physician, what you be and why?

I pursued medicine and eventually pediatrics because of my interest in science and my love for children. If I wasn’t a pediatrician, then I think being a teacher would be another way for me to help children.

What are your hobbies and interests outside of medicine?

I enjoy spending time with my husband and children. I have a 5-year-old daughter and 3-year-old son who keep me very busy. We like being outdoors, whether it’s playing at the park or riding our bikes. We travel as often as we can. I also like to read, when I can find any free time.

What’s the funniest thing a patient said to you?

Several of my pre-school aged patients have told me I look like Doc McStuffins. This helps me to connect with them and put them more at ease during their visits. I dressed up as Doc McStuffin for Halloween a few years ago, and my younger patients were star struck!

Dr. Basu and her colleagues at Pediatric & Adult Medicine, Inc. are part of the CHOC Children’s Primary Care Network. You can reach her at 714-565-7960.

Meet Dr. Esther Yang

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Esther Yang, a pediatric psychiatrist.

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I attended UCLA for undergrad, Loma Linda University for medical school, and University of California, Irvine for both my psychiatric residency and child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?

A: Two months.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: I am interested in cultural psychiatry, the integration of mental health and spirituality, and implementing a holistic approach in treatment by working with therapists and other providers to integrate care. During fellowship training, I received a grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to work with minority communities in building awareness about mental health.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: Depression, anxiety and ADHD. It seems to be much harder today to be a teen than it was ten years ago with social media, bullying, and increased responsibilities.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you/your division at CHOC? 

A: In the psychiatry clinic at CHOC, virtually every patient that we see is also seen by a therapist in the same clinic, making it possible to integrate care, and all of our doctors are fellowship trained in child and adolescent psychiatry.  There are many resources and more on the horizon with the opening of the inpatient unit and the intensive outpatient program.

Q: What excites you most about CHOC’s mental health initiative? 

A: It’s an exciting time at CHOC with the upcoming opening of the inpatient mental health unit, programs such as the intensive outpatient program and new clinics – all coming at a time when there continues to be a shortage in providers and services in psychiatric care. It inspires me to work at a place that is committed to the treatment of children and advancing mental health care.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered at CHOC? 

A: I love the concept of a hospital that is dedicated to the treatment of children and that every single person shares that dedication.  I’ve had personal experiences with my children being patients at CHOC prior to working here and it was a very positive experience where we felt genuinely taken care of.  I knew that if I ever had the opportunity to work here, it would be a privilege.

Q: Why did you decide to become a pediatric psychiatrist? 

A: I decided to become a pediatric psychiatrist my senior year in high school after hearing a psychiatrist talk about mental health and the great stigma that exists in the minority communities during a lecture at our church. I’ve never regretted this decision and it’s been an incredible journey. I enjoy listening to everyone’s unique stories and working to break stigmas and barriers to access to care, which continue to exist.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A: Honestly, I would probably be a stay-at-home mom. I love spending time with my family, doing crafts with my kids and cooking. I also believe that the key to healthy kids starts in the home, and my skills as a psychiatrist are sometimes useful at home when it comes to training and discipline.

Q: What are your hobbies and interests outside of psychiatry? 

A: I enjoy reading, baking, and crafting.

Q: What was the funniest thing a patient told you?

A: I told my therapy patient that I would have to transfer his care to another doctor because I was going on maternity leave.  He replied, “Oh, I thought you were fat or something.” I was nine months pregnant.

Meet Dr. Saeed Awan

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Saeed Awan, a pediatric general and thoracic surgeon.

 Q: What is your education and training?

A: I attended medical school at Khyber Medical College, in Pakistan. I completed my surgery residency at Memorial University of Newfoundland & Labrador, in Canada. I also completed two surgery fellowships, one at Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Edinburgh, in United Kingdom, and another at Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, in Canada.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: All aspects of pediatric and neonatal surgery, especially minimal invasive surgery. I also have expertise in liver and bile duct surgery and special interest in gastroschisis sutureless closure.

Q: How many years have you been on staff at CHOC?

A: Three and a half years.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: Inguinal and umbilical hernias, hydroceles, undescended testis, appendicitis, lumps and bumps, as well as complex congenital pediatric and neonatal conditions.

Q: Are there any new programs or developments within your specialty (at CHOC or in the broader field)?

A: I am leading the pediatric surgery outreach office at CHOC Children’s Health Center, Corona. We have seen gradual increase in referrals.

In the broader field, there has been remarkable advancement in minimally-invasive surgical procedures with similar or better results than open surgical procedures.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about you/your division at CHOC?

A: We are group of dedicated and highly-trained pediatric surgeons who strive to provide excellent care to our patients. We make sure both parents and the patients are involved in the decision making. Being a father of four children, I treat my patients as I would like to have my own children treated.

In addition to our common surgical conditions, I treat complex neonatal and gastrointestinal conditions.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?

A: I’m inspired by our CHOC physicians, our excellent nursing and support staff, our wide range of subspecialists, as well as our state-of-the-art facility.

In our specialty, we meet a lot of children and the smile on their and their parents’ faces  after they have recovered from surgery, makes me very happy.

Q: Why did you decide to become a pediatric surgeon?  

A: I decided to become a pediatric surgeon when I was a third-year medical student. Pediatric general surgery is a field where you are able to take care of sick kids with a wide variety of surgical diseases. Although pediatric surgery is very challenging, it is very rewarding.

Q: If you weren’t a physician, what would you be and why?

A: I might have been a pilot as I like travel.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: Travel, soccer and spending time with my children.

In the Spotlight: Wyman Lai, M.D.

A nationally-recognized pediatric cardiologist with expertise in fetal cardiology and non-invasive imaging for heart disease in fetuses and children has joined CHOC Children’s. Dr. Wyman Lai is the new medical director of echocardiography at CHOC; co-medical director of the CHOC Heart Institute, and assistant division chief of cardiology with CHOC Children’s Specialists.

“CHOC has a fabulous mix of state-of-the-art care, community presence, and academic achievement. I thoroughly enjoy working with my colleagues, who strive to provide the very best care available. The administrative staff at CHOC has also been extremely supportive. Together we are building a pediatric service that rivals any in the region, and we have our sights on even higher goals,” Dr. Lai says.

Dr. Lai’s passion for helping others inspired him to become a doctor. His original plan was to go into academic primary care pediatrics, and he majored in maternal and child health for his Master of Public Health degree. Early in his training, he switched to pediatric cardiology after becoming fascinated with what the pediatric cardiologists were doing.

“In pediatric cardiology, we are able to make a profound difference in the lives of our patients. With our surgical colleagues, we have made incredible advances in life-saving therapies over the past five decades,” Dr. Lai says. “The heart is an amazingly complex organ; it starts off as a simple tube, and it’s a wonder that it ever develops normally into a four-chambered pumping organ that delivers oxygen efficiently throughout our body.”

Dr. Lai attended medical school at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University. He completed his residency at UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center, followed by a pediatric cardiology fellowship at UCLA Medical Center, and later, a pediatric cardiology MRI fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Since joining CHOC, Dr. Lai has been treating patients with complex congenital heart disease. He is also treating patients with the full spectrum of heart conditions, from heart murmurs to chest pain and syncope.

Dr. Lai’s approach towards his patients and their families is to treat them like family members.

“As with all families, however, not everyone is the same,” he explains. “Some patients and parents want more medical information and some less. Some want to be very involved in the decision-making process and some not so much. My practice is to provide them with enough information and support, so they feel comfortable with the decisions they are making.”

Along with Drs. Nita Doshi and Pierangelo Renella, Dr. Lai is helping to build a great program in fetal cardiology at CHOC. He is also working with Dr. Renella to grow the congenital cardiac MRI program, including the use in non-invasive imaging for creating 3D heart models.

“We recently used a 3D cardiac MRI dataset to print several heart models that were used to assist in the planning of care for a child with complex congenital heart disease. Another area of innovation is our purchase of new patient monitoring software in the cardiovascular ICU that will help us to identify patients at risk for acute deterioration before it happens,” Dr. Lai says.

In April, Dr. Lai will serve as co-program director for an inaugural conference hosted by CHOC, Pacific Coast Fetal Cardiology 2017: An Interactive and Case-Based Educational Symposium, in Newport Beach. The conference supports CHOC’s efforts to improve the success of fetal cardiac screening in the region, he says.

Dr. Lai is a prolific author who has published numerous journal articles and chapters, and has contributed to several high-level textbooks utilized throughout the country. He has lectured extensively in the United States and internationally. Dr. Lai is a member of the American College of Cardiology, American Society of Echocardiography, and American Academy of Pediatrics, among other professional organizations. In addition, he sits on the National Board of Echocardiography Board of Directors.

His ongoing academic interests include creating a reliable set of normal values for cardiovascular structures in newborns and children, developing pediatric cardiac MRI guidelines, and testing new cardiac MRI sequences.

In his spare time, Dr. Lai loves spending time with his family. He also enjoys swimming, biking and running. He hopes to run in this year’s Boston and New York marathons, which he has participated in the past. He is also attending classes for a health care executive MBA at UC Irvine.

For cardiology referral guidelines, click here. To refer a patient, call 888-770-2462. 

To contact Dr. Lai, please call 714-509-3939.