Premier CHOC leukemia and immunotherapy conference draws international experts

A premier CHOC Children’s symposium centered around the complex issues facing pediatric leukemia patients drew more than 150 international leaders in the field of children’s leukemia treatment and research. This two-day conference had 33 speakers from various renowned institutions.

Building on the scientific foundation and exchange of information established in the gathering’s five-year history, attendees of the 2018 Society of Young Adult Oncology (SAYAO)/CHOC Children’s Leukemia Symposium shared the latest scientific and clinical advances in acute leukemia, specifically immunotherapy.

CHOC Children’s physician Dr. Van T. Huynh, chaired the symposium and presented her research on asparaginase therapy and silent inactivation.

Titled “From Pediatric to Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia – The Age of Cellular Therapy,” the Nov. 5 and 6 symposia focused largely on CAR-T cell therapy and new agents for the treatment of acute leukemia. Specific topics included:

  • an update on CAR-T cell products and trials;
  • the future of CD 19, CD22 and NK CAR cell trials;
  • the economics of CAR-T cell therapy;
  • update on leukemia therapy for pediatrics and adolescent and young adults; and
  • supportive care and oncofertility for the leukemia patient.
The symposium drew more than 150 international pediatric leukemia leaders and 33 speakers from various renowned institutions.

The symposium was chaired by CHOC physician Dr. Van T. Huynh, who also presented her research on asparaginase therapy and silent inactivation. CHOC physician Dr. Carol Lin discussed toxicity and management of asparaginase therapy.

Learn more about referring a patient to the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s.

Conference Tackles Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

SAYAO-LogoIn a contrast to its inaugural year, the 2014 Society of Young Adult Oncology (SAYAO) Conference focused entirely on a specific type of cancer: acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Instead of again focusing on general psychosocial aspects of cancer treatments in the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population, this year’s approach allowed attendees to explore survivorship disparities between adult patients and the AYA population, Dr. Leonard Sender, SAYAO founder and medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, told “The Huffington Post.”

Held Oct. 6 through 8 at UC Irvine, “Breaking Barriers in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia” drew about 250 attendees, including 60 speakers and delegates. For more coverage of the conference, as well as a video, read “The Huffington Post” article.

The 2013 conference covered general psychosocial aspects of cancer treatment in adolescents and young adults. Read an in-depth summary of the 2013 conference, including links to its coverage on “The Huffington Post.”

Learn more about SAYAO.

CHOC’s AYA Cancer Efforts Earn National Attention

The adolescent and young adult cancer movement has helped define patients by age rather than disease and raise awareness of the population’s unique needs, Dr. Leonard Sender, medical director of the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC Children’s, tells “The Huffington Post.”

Dr. Sender’s and CHOC’s leadership role in the adolescent and young adult cancer movement were prominently featured recently on the popular online news site that covers a range of topics such as health care, technology, business, politics and entertainment.

The three-part series was centered on the recent Society of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (SAYAO) conference held in partnership with CHOC’s Cancer Institute.

The first piece featured an interview with Dr. Sender who is also the director of the Cancer Institute’s adolescent and young adult program and developed SAYAO. Dr. Sender discussed the movement’s achievements, its ongoing priorities and goals, as well as its future.

“I believe the movement as a whole is going to help define four big age groups of people getting cancers, and that we are going to start addressing cancer in terms of what it means for those age groups,” he said. “So, what does it mean for a geriatric patient who is different from an adult who is different from an AYA who is different from a pediatric patient?”

CHOCThe series’ second installment, “Advances in the Young Adult Cancer Movement: Why SAYAO Is a Big Deal,” discussed the origins of SAYAO and its efforts to create an academic space for medical professionals to discuss and educate one another on the specific topics relevant to this patient population.

The article also provided an overview of the two-day conference held in October.

The series’ third piece, “New Innovation in the AYA Cancer Movement: The Future is Here,” detailed new technology discussed at the conference that could factor in future treatment of adolescents and young adults with cancer.

For example, My Bridge 4 Life, an organization whose products use technology to help people improve healthcare management, developed the Infusionarium at CHOC’s Cancer Institute. The Infusionarium, which ran as a pilot in 2013, incorporated sensory elements and media to help combat the isolation, boredom and stress often felt by patients during cancer treatment.

Also, My Bridge 4 Life and SeventyK announced a new video survival guide and eBook for adolescents and young adults with cancer.