IT Update from the Chief Health Information Officer: Dr. William Feaster

As our current fiscal year comes to an end, I am pleased with all the progress we have made this year and look forward to new and exciting information technology (IT) projects on the horizon. Last February, we welcomed a new vice president and chief information officer, John Henderson, to our organization. He joined us from Texas Children’s Hospital and has been a huge addition to our leadership at CHOC Children’s. A seasoned IT leader, John has a successful track record of guiding cohesive teams in the design, deployment, administration and enhancement of enterprise IT applications and infrastructures. We are also excited to onboard our new chief technology officer, Adam Gold, who will also be a great addition to our team.  The CTO is a new position for CHOC and Adam will be responsible for all our infrastructure including computers, networks, data center, communications and other technologies.

Dr. William Feaster, chief health information officer at CHOC

Currently, our technical staff just finished the roll-out of tap-and-go access to our clinical computers in the inpatient areas, emergency department, surgery (outside of OR and procedure rooms) and Outpatient Infusion Center. Now, when you log-in to our systems from these clinical areas, you can tap-in with your badge.  This has been a huge win, especially for our nursing staff, saving them a lot of time during the day as they frequently log in and log out. We hope to continue to optimize the performance of this technology and implement it in our clinics and other outpatient service areas beginning in July.

Remote access to our systems is also changing with the addition of two-factor authentication (2FA), a security process in which the user provides authentication factors to verify they are who they say they are. This is just as essential for protecting patient medical records as it is your bank account.  While 2FA is not new, it has become more prevalent in the current digital age. Beginning in June, we will be cancelling access to remote.choc.org for those who have already registered for two-factor authentication and over the following months, we will be switching all remote users to secure.choc.org.  Stay tuned for more information coming soon.

We are currently implementing a new Dynamic Documentation build in our Children’s Medical Group (CMG), replacing their current PowerNotes documentation. Beginning in July, we will be implementing our Cerner EMR in our other primary care practices, along with Cerner Pro Fee billing, and a new version of Cerner’s registration and scheduling called Cerner Practice Management (CPM).  CMG and our specialty care clinics that are part of CHOC Children’s Network will also be going to the new Pro Fee billing and CPM over the next year.  These enhancements are a huge undertaking, which are currently consuming our IT resources and may delay some of the requests that are frequently submitted.  We ask for your patience over these next several months.

In addition, we are continuing to advance our work in population health, data science and analytics. We are also continuing to develop new technologies to improve the care of our patients with chronic diseases, advance home monitoring technologies, better support our care management staff both in and out of the hospital, and develop predictive models for readmission and patient deterioration, among other things.

Lastly, we are eagerly awaiting the final word on our capital budget for FY19 to determine what new projects are approved for next year. Our highest priority right now is to implement E-prescribing for controlled substances (EPCS), which we hope to do in the first half of FY19.

Should you have any questions about any of these developments, or other issues related to current information technology systems, please feel free to contact me at wfeaster@choc.org, or at 714-509-7637.

William Feaster, MD

CHOC Children’s Chief Health Information Officer

Mental Health Nurse Manager Shares How Nursing is the Art of Caring for People

CHOC Children’s wants its community providers to get to know its staff. In recognition of National Mental Health Awareness Month, meet Lisa Schneider, nurse manager in CHOC’s new Mental Health Inpatient Center.

Q: What is your education and training?
A: I have a degree in nursing from The Ohio State University, and I am in the last semester of completing my master’s degree with a focus on Nursing Administration. In addition, I am a board-certified psychiatric-mental health registered nurse.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?
A: I am very passionate about pediatric mental health. I have a strong interest in trauma-related diagnoses and crisis prevention, as well as serving as an advocate to de-stigmatize mental health.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?
A: I am new to the organization and so excited to be here! I have been with CHOC since January 2018.

Q: What diagnoses are most common among the patients you care for?
A: As the community is beginning to recognize mental health disorders sooner, children and adolescents can present with a wide range of diagnoses such as depression, anxiety, eating disorders, psychosis, autism, PTSD, and ADHD, among others.

Q: What myths about mental health would you like to dispel?

A: Many people believe that talking to kids about suicide can put the idea into their heads. However extensive research has shown that this is not the case. Suicide is currently the second leading cause of death in children and young adults ages 10-24. Start the conversation now and talk to your kids about suicide – it could save their life.

Q: What excites you most about the Mental Health Inpatient Center?

A: The opening of the Mental Health Inpatient Center is so exciting because we will be providing innovative care and services to children and their families. The unit will consist of private rooms, group activity rooms, an expansive outdoor play area, along with daily programming such as music therapy, art therapy, pet therapy, and classroom education. The Center is designed around aspects of nature to promote a holistic and healing environment.

In addition, every child will receive a comprehensive treatment plan which will include individual and family therapy sessions while inpatient, and care continuation at discharge. I am so excited for the positive impact this Center will have on the kids in our community, especially since we will be the first to offer inpatient mental health services to children under the age of 12 in Orange County.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered here at CHOC?
A: I am inspired by the tremendous amount of dedication that CHOC has shown in our mission to provide quality healthcare to children. Specifically, we are taking a leadership role and setting a high standard through our commitment to de-stigmatizing mental health and expanding services. It is important to remember health does not solely rely on physical health, but strongly depends on mental health as well. In order to achieve overall health and well-being, mental health must be cared for with the same emphasis that is placed on physical health.

Q: Why did you decide to become a nurse?
A: I chose to become a nurse based on the philosophy of nursing. Nursing is known not only as a science, but also as an art in caring for people. I have a passion for creating strong nurse-patient relationships, which can promote the healing process. I chose pediatrics because I’m inspired by the resiliency I see in children, and mental health specifically because I strongly believe in the concepts of prevention and early intervention.

Q: If you weren’t a nurse, what would you be and why?
A: If I wasn’t a nurse, I think I would probably be a police officer. I enjoy serving others and building strong relationships within the community.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?
A: Outside of work, I love spending time with my husband and 4-year-old son. We are new to California so we have been spending a lot of time exploring this beautiful state!

Learn more about CHOC’s mental health services at www.choc.org/mentalhealth.

Meet Dr. Micaela Thordarson

CHOC Children’s wants its referring physicians to get to know its specialists. Today, meet Dr. Micaela Thordarson, lead psychologist, ASPIRE® (After School Program Interventions and Resiliency Education) Intensive Outpatient Program at CHOC Children’s. 

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I earned my bachelor’s degree in psychobiology from UCLA with a minor in Spanish. I earned my PhD and master’s degree in clinical psychology from Palo Alto University with a specialization in children, adolescents and families. I completed my pre-doctoral internship with Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and my post-doctoral fellowship with Geisinger Health Systems in Pennsylvania.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: I am particularly passionate about working with high-risk pediatric patients. I have done a great deal of work with suicidal and self-harming youth and their families. As a bilingual clinician in Spanish and English, I am also very interested in the interactions between mental health and cultural identities, for example, race/ethnicity, gender, religion and age.

Q: How long have you been on staff at CHOC?

A: I joined CHOC in October 2017.

Q: What are your most common diagnoses?

A: Depression, anxiety, and major life stressors are the most common difficulties our patients face.

Q: What would you most like community/referring providers to know about the ASPIRE® Intensive Outpatient Program at CHOC Children’s?

A: Our eight-week intensive outpatient mental health treatment program – the only pediatric-dedicated one of its kind in Orange County — is designed to serve a broad range of emotional and behavioral difficulties for high-school aged teens 13-18. It includes individual and family sessions, and crisis support as needed. If the teens and families you serve could possibly benefit from an intensive program, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me. Additionally, we aim to collaborate closely with all the important stakeholders in our patients’ lives. This includes primary care physicians, psychiatrists, therapists, educators and coaches.

Q: What would you most like patients and families to know about ASPIRE®?

A: While our program is hard work, it’s pretty fun to be a part of! The daily after-school programming for teens and their families is all interactive, including art and other expressive therapies, and designed to teach and practice new skills in fun ways.

Q: What excites you most about the program?

A: I am so excited to be able to offer a very important service to teens and families who are in crisis and need extra support. The program we offer is guided by research and has been carefully constructed to generate the best outcomes possible.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered at CHOC?

A: I have worked with a number of different organizations and teams since I began my career in the mental health field. The team at CHOC is unparalleled in its enthusiastic dedication to innovation and excellence in the care of children.

Q: Why did you decide to become a psychologist?

A: I fell in love with the field of psychology immediately after taking my first job at a crisis shelter for teens. Getting to witness, and even participate in, the incredible changes these youths made in their lives in a few short weeks was inspirational. I knew that was work I wanted to be a part of for the rest of my career.

Q: If you weren’t a psychologist, what would you be and why?

A: Either a zookeeper, so I could spend time with cool animals every day, or a Disney princess at one of the theme parks so I could wear awesome costumes and play with kids all day.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: I love spending time with my family, hiking with my dog, and eating delicious food. I have a huge family and we have a lot of fun together!

To contact Dr. Thordarson, or to refer a patient, please call 714-509-8481.

CHOC’s VP of Human Resources Joins Cast of Footloose Follies

One of Orange County’s most popular fundraisers , CHOC Follies, is back March 29-31 with their newest musical production, “Footloose Follies,” benefitting CHOC Children’s. Set against an 80s backdrop, the humorous toe-tapping show, featuring a cast of local social and business leaders, is sure to be fun for the whole family.

We talked to Tom Capizzi, CHOC’s vice president of human resources, about his role in the upcoming show.

Tom Capizzi, CHOC Children’s vice president, human resources

Q: How long have you been at CHOC?

A: I have been with CHOC two and a half fantastic years.

Q: How did you get involved with the show? Why is this important to you?

A: I have been a fan of the Follies for many years. I always felt it would be great to be a part of the production and give back as a senior leader at CHOC. In my role, I am always in front of many associates and love the opportunity to speak to as many people as I can. This year I decided, “Why not; let’s do it!”

Q: Did you have any experience with theater prior to the CHOC Follies?

A: I did some theater while in college, and later when my daughter was in a children’s regional theater group I was asked to participate in several adult parts.

Q: What is your favorite part of the show?

A: The cast brings such energy and passion to the show, which in my opinion is very infectious and speaks to our mission and why we all are aligned – associates, physicians, donors and volunteers – with our mission to nurture, advance and protect the health and well being of children.

Q: Why should the community support the show?

A: Join us, it’s a wonderful time, very entertaining. And the dedication, passion and time commitment that the cast makes every year, which is all voluntary, speaks volumes to how important CHOC is to them and how critical philanthropy is to the success of our mission to care for our community’s children and their families.

“Footloose Follies” will be held March 29-30, 8 p.m.; March 31,  2 p.m. and 8 p.m., at the Robert B. Moore Theatre at Orange Coast College, in Costa Mesa. Visit choc.org for tickets.

Meet Dr. Shireen Guide

CHOC Children’s wants its medical staff and patients to get to know its growing team of physicians, including primary and specialty care providers. Today, meet one of our specialists, Dr. Shireen Guide, a pediatric dermatologist.

Dr. Shireen Guide

Q: What is your education and training?

A: I trained at Stanford University Medical Center for both medical school and my internship. Subsequently, I completed my dermatology residency at University of Texas, Southwestern. I then went on to complete a pediatric dermatology fellowship at UC San Diego – Rady Children’s Hospital. I am board certified in both dermatology and pediatric dermatology and have been practicing in Orange County for the last 11 years.

Q: What are your special clinical interests?

A: I have a special interest in birthmarks and genetic conditions that are associated with specific skin manifestations. I also enjoy helping families better control chronic skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis and acne.

Q: What are some new developments within your specialty?

A: Developments in pediatric dermatology developments, such as safer biologics and better lasers for psoriasis, have led to improved treatment outcomes. Using dermatoscopic imaging modalities has provided the ability to better control margins and minimize scaring when we remove abnormal moles.

Q: What would you most like community providers to know about your division at CHOC?

A: Our pediatric dermatology clinic encompasses the evaluation of patient concerns regarding all hair, skin and nail conditions. We perform a variety of minor surgical excisions such as cyst, lipoma and birthmark removals. We also use minimal incision techniques which results in smaller scars while removing larger subcutaneous nodules or lesions.

Q: What inspires you most about the care being delivered at CHOC?

A: Our CHOC clinic allows us to help families with complicated medical conditions, minimal resources and limited access to specialty care.

Q: Why did you decide to get into the medical field?  

A: My father immigrated to America with minimal resources, and through his hard work and dedication, this country allowed him the opportunity to become a highly decorated military officer and a successful doctor. The value of education was instilled in me since childhood and I am very proud to have followed in my father’s medical footsteps.

Q: What have you learned from patients and families?

A: I have learned that patients want their doctors to listen to them and know their names, and involve families  as active partners in their care team.

Q: What are your hobbies/interests outside of work?

A: I enjoy playing the piano and spending time with my husband and three amazing children. We love to visit local zoos, museums and parks.