New tool for craniosynostosis treatment highlights Neuroscience Institute’s push to advance care

For pediatric neurosurgeon, Dr. Suresh Magge and his colleagues in the CHOC Neuroscience Institute, Christmas this year arrived in late June.

That’s when a 3D camera system was installed in the neurosurgery clinic that will significantly advance CHOC’s mission to treat craniosynostosis, says Dr. Magge, PSF neurosurgery division chief for CHOC and co-medical director of the Neuroscience Institute.

Craniosynostosis, which affects 1 in every 2,000 infants, causes an infant’s skull to fuse early, creating an irregular skull shape, and can lead to increased pressure on the brain as a child matures. This can lead to headaches, vision problems, and cognitive issues. 

The 3D motion-capture camera can, in seconds, capture a comprehensive array of images that will allow CHOC neurosurgeons to better analyze and measure in detail a child’s head. This, in turn, will allow them to enhance research in craniosynostosis and design the best possible treatments.

Dr. Suresh Magge, neurosurgery medical director
Dr. Suresh Magge, neurosurgery medical director

“This really makes a difference,” says Dr. Magge, noting that traditional 2D photos and measurements “only go so far.”

“This new camera allows us to get data quickly and safely,” Dr. Magge says.

CHOC recently had its first craniosynostosis patient imaged by the 3D camera.

A push to greatness

The new camera is a critical step in Dr. Magge’s push to advance the path of the Neuroscience Institute in becoming a world-class destination for neurological care.

Dr. Magge was recruited to CHOC last October after an 11-year tenure at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., where he started the medical center’s neurosurgery fellowship training program and was the director of medical student education in pediatric neurosurgery.

During his time at Children’s National, Dr. Magge started the region’s first minimally invasive craniosynostosis program. He has brought this surgery to CHOC as well.

The neurosurgery division also includes Dr. Michael Muhonen, Dr. William Loudon, and Dr. Joffre Olaya.

For the last several decades, the go-to surgery to treat craniosynostosis has been an open surgical correction called calvarial reconstruction. For this surgery, doctors must wait until the child is 6-12 months of age and perform a large surgery that involves opening the scalp, taking apart the entire skull, then putting it back together.

“It’s a good surgery, and most kids do well, but we have newer techniques that are less invasive,” Dr. Magge says. The open calvarial reconstruction surgery generally takes 4-6 hours and requires a hospital stay of 3-5 days, as well as a blood transfusion during surgery. 

Unlocking the skull

The minimally invasive procedure Dr. Magge learned during his fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital involves using an endoscope with a camera attached to its tip.

After making one or two small incisions, Dr. Magge goes under the scalp and then under the skull, using the endoscope to separate the skull from the underlying tissue. He then cuts out a piece of bone — 1 to 2 centimeters in width – to “unlock” the skull.

This surgery only takes about an hour, and most children don’t need a blood transfusion and can go home the next day. After surgery, they wear a molding helmet that helps to reshape the skull. This minimally invasive surgery is generally done by 3-4 months of age (earlier than the open surgery).

“The data shows this surgery works very well,” says Dr. Magge, who has given many presentations and written multiple papers about this procedure.

The aesthetic results have been shown to be excellent in many papers, Dr. Magge says. What still needs to be verified by research are the long-term cognitive outcomes of patients after either the open or minimally invasive surgery.

To that end, Dr. Magge launched a study about two years ago involving patients from multiple hospitals that looks at children five years after surgery. Dr. Magge plans to enroll patients from CHOC in the study.

He estimates the study will be completed in about two years. 

Working with plastic surgeon Dr. Raj Vyas, Dr. Magge says CHOC offers comprehensive cranio-facial services. 

Dr. Raj Vyas
Dr. Raj Vyas

“To be comprehensive,” he says, “you have to offer traditional surgery as well as minimally invasive surgery.” 

Part of the funding for the new 3D camera came from a CSO grant established by CHOC Vice President for Research and Chief Scientific Officer Dr. Terence Sanger, a physician, engineer, and computational neuroscientist who also is vice chair of research for pediatrics at the UCI School of Medicine.

Dr. Terence Sanger
Dr. Terence Sanger

The 3D camera arrives as significant infrastructure changes are underway at the Neuroscience Institute: CHOC recently opened its new state-of-the-art outpatient center, establishing a clinical hub for caregivers to serve patients and families in a centralized location. Additionally, plans are underway to expand the hospital’s inpatient neuroscience unit.

“CHOC has been very supportive of the Neuroscience Institute,” Dr. Magge says. “I’m very excited.”

Learn more about the CHOC Neuroscience Institute.

Neuroscience leaders discuss innovations and their successes, and the need for much more work to be done

Two of CHOC’s leading pediatric neurosurgeons recently shared their insights on how innovation is helping to close the gap between clinical needs and the availability of pediatric devices, but how there is much more work to be done to get critically ill kids the treatments they need.

The webinar, “From Clinical Insight to Commercialization: Innovations That Can Transform Pediatric Healthcare,” featured Dr. Suresh N. Magge, CHOC CS Neurosurgery Division Chief, and co-director of CHOC’s Neuroscience Institute, and Dr. Michael G. Muhonen, the institute’s previous co-director.

Hosting the “OC LIFe (Lifesciences Innovators Forum)” on April 28, 2021 was Dr. Terence Sanger, a physician, engineer, and computational neuroscientist and vice president, chief scientific officer at CHOC, and vice chair of research for pediatrics at the UCI School of Medicine.

“As innovators, we should never be satisfied,” said Dr. Sanger, who specializes in movement disorders and who helped pioneer deep brain stimulation, which has yielded positive outcomes. “An innovative and collaborative approach is required so that pediatric patients can have access to the fit-for-purpose devices they need.”

Brain tumor treatments

Drs. Magge and Muhonen took turns discussing new neurosurgical technologies and opportunities for interventions.

Dr. Magge focused on new technology that has been used to treat brain tumors, which are a different breed compared to adult brain tumors. More often, Dr. Magge said, pediatric brain tumors are of a lower grade and can be treated.

“Many kids have gone on to live good lives thanks to innovation, research, and applying the technologies we have,” Dr. Magge said.

In one example, he detailed how microsurgical techniques have greatly aided in the removal of a craniopharyngioma, a benign tumor that usually arises in the base of the brain near the pituitary gland that can be dangerous or life threatening if not treated.

“If you can get the tumor out,” Dr. Magge said, “you can cure the patient. But it’s challenging because it’s in a deep part of the brain.” 

During the procedure, the neurosurgeon must locate some of the natural divides of the brain and separate them out to get to the tumor. Microsurgery allows the neurosurgeon to work between very narrow areas.

With a technology known as surgical navigation, neurosurgeons can pinpoint exactly where they are in the brain and get to very specific areas. Another technology is a powerful microscope that magnifies small areas of the brain. In addition, ultrasound and MRI within the operating room can tell you in surgery if there is any tumor left. 

“This is all thanks to innovation and technology that we are incorporating in surgery,” Dr. Magge said.

Dr. Magge then discussed medulloblastomas, one of the most common types of tumors neurosurgeons see in kids. Such large tumors grow in the lower back part of the brain — the cerebellum, which is involved in muscle coordination, balance, and movement.

Thirty years ago, Dr. Magge said, kids with medulloblastomas received high doses of radiation that left a lot of them with severe cognitive and hormonal deficits.

The treatment for medulloblastomas had evolved so that less radiation is used in the treatment. In addition, in the last decade, researchers have discovered that these tumors differ significantly based on their genetic makeup.

“These tumors have multiple genetic subtypes, and we can target them genetically with different types of treatments,” Dr. Magge explained.

He said innovation also has led to advances in the treatment of diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIGP), highly aggressive and difficult-to-treat brain tumors that grow in an area of the brainstem that controls many of the body’s most vital functions such as breathing, blood pressure, and heart rate.

The prognosis for DIPGs remains very poor because they are considered non-resectable tumors – ones that cannot be removed with surgery. Life expectancy is eight to 12 months after diagnosis.

“This is one of the toughest diagnoses we have to give to families because of the lack of good treatment options,” Dr. Magge said.

For years, biopsies were ruled out because they could cause significant side effects, and neurosurgeons saw no point in performing them since there were no treatments. Without biopsies, the tumor tissue could not be studied in a lab for potentially effective treatments. 

Technology has changed this is the last 10 years, Dr. Magge said, thanks to stereotactically guided needles that allow neurosurgeons to perform DIPG biopsies safely.

“We at CHOC and other pediatric hospitals have shown we can do this safely with minimum morbidity,” said Dr. Magge, who has participated in a large clinical trial regarding DIPG biopsies.

“With this technology, we can get tissue and genetically sequence these tumors and find out if there are certain mutations that are particularly amenable to certain treatments,” Dr. Magge said of this precision-medicine approach. 

“These are small steps along the path,” he added. “We have by no means found all the answers. We have so much farther to go, but I think we’re on the right track.” 

Closing the gap

Dr. Muhonen recalled one of the first patients he saw when he came to Orange County in 1995: a young girl with severe spasms in her legs. She couldn’t walk without assistance.

“We had to do something innovative,” Dr. Muhonen said.

He had injected baclofen, a muscle relaxer and antispasmodic agent, into the spinal column of an adult the year before, but never in a child. After receiving approval to do so, he implanted a device that allowed long-term injection of baclofen in the girl’s spinal cord. Six months later, she was able to walk and even run on her own.

In another example of innovation, Dr. Muhonen worked for five years on helping to develop a wireless sensor to measure pressure in the brain. The FDA approved the device for adults, but has yet to for children.

Most companies get medical devices approved for adults because it’s easier, because there’s a larger patient population, and there’s more money to be made. 

“The bulk of challenges associated with developing and accelerating pediatric medical devices is market-driven,” Dr. Muhonen said. “We want children to get the best possible care available, but the relative market size is small compared to adults, which is one reason some device makers avoid it.”

One of Dr. Muhonen’s chief interests is treating hydrocephalus, the buildup of fluid in the ventricles deep within the brain.

Innovation in this area has been a long time coming, he said, since the invention in the early 1950s of a shunt that drained fluid from the brain into the abdominal cavity. Many problems can occur with the shunt, such as spontaneously twisting up into a knot due to a child’s movement or calcifying and breaking apart after being in the body for a long time. Kids who received a shunt typically face more than 10 surgeries, Dr. Muhonen said.

“The holy grail for pediatric neurosurgeons is, can we create a ‘smart shunt?’” Dr. Muhonen said.

An ideal shunt, he said, could be programmed to drain a specific amount of water and measure pressure.

Dr. Muhonen said a derivative from cone snails is inspiring research into a new generation of painkillers for adults, but has yet to be approved for testing on kids.

Impediments to innovation

Dr. Sanger asked Drs. Magge and Muhonen about impediments to pediatric innovation. Ethically, he posited, shouldn’t new devices and other innovations be tested in adults first? 

“I don’t think there are any easy answers to this,” Dr. Magge said. “It’s difficult. You don’t just do a biopsy on a tumor that might help kids in the future. If you perform surgery on a child, there has to be some potential benefit to that child.”

Dr. Muhonen said children are the most vulnerable of society and thus are the worthiest of innovations in healthcare. 

Dr. Magge said he and others at CHOC have been looking at ways to inject dyes to paint brain tumors to more easily distinguish them from healthy brain tissue.

“Sometimes the tumor is obvious, sometimes it’s more challenging,” he said.  While dye injections have been used in adults, it is less commonly used in children.

Dr. Sanger mentioned “big effect sizes” resulting from innovation in pediatric medicine. 

“We’re used to the idea of statistical research involving a lot of patients,” he said. “But this is a different type of research. You take someone who has never walked before and now they’re running. You take someone who is going to die of a brain tumor and now they’re not. These are very big effect sizes.” 

“There are good reasons for the regulations we have,” Dr. Magge said. “That being said, that doesn’t mean we can’t innovate. And there are mechanisms for us to do that, and to do it safely.

“Our first motto is, ‘Do no harm,’” Dr. Magge continued. “I always tell residents to do the right thing and treat each patient as if they were your own child. Doing the right thing means asking the right questions. ‘How can we do this better?’ You can always learn from everything you do. At the end of every procedure, you critique it. You’re constantly learning. That’s what I always encourage.” 

Dr. Sanger closed the session by noting that clinical evidence should ideally be reflective of the spectrum of pediatric patients and the developmental differences that can impact the use and effectiveness of medical devices.

“This is a collaborative effort,” he added. “CHOC is working closely with the FDA’s new System of Hospitals for Innovation in Pediatrics – Medical Devices (SHIP-MD) Program, our academic partners, industry, entrepreneurs and the investor community to close the gaps. Also, we are now practicing medicine in a world immersed with data. Advances in computing and health information technology have given rise to new sources and types of biomedical data. Clinicians know real-world data will continue to emerge as a source of clinical evidence.”

The Presenting Sponsor of the webinar, “From Clinical Insight to Commercialization: Innovations That Can Transform Pediatric Healthcare,”  was Biocom California, which connects life science organizations to each other so they can collaborate and work smarter together. The CHOC Research Institute co-sponsored the hour-plus session.

The webinar was presented in partnership with SBDC @ UCI Beall Applied Innovation, a resource for any high-technology, high-growth, scalable venture from the community or the UCI ecosystem that needs help with business planning, business development and funding-readiness.

Learn more about CHOC’s Neuroscience Institute.

Personalized medicine, surgical innovations advance pediatric brain tumor care

The Neuro-Oncology Treatment Program at the Hyundai Cancer Institute at CHOC is doing more than providing the most advanced care for pediatric brain tumors — it’s also helping to shape the future of personalized medicine and surgical innovations.

CHOC offers a full range of standard treatments for brain tumors, as well as personalized therapies for many tumor types, such as medulloblastomas, based on genetic subtyping. Experimental treatments are available through Children’s Oncology Group and other consortium and industry-driven clinical trials. Some of these studies — including a trial developed by a CHOC neuro-oncologist to investigate a vaccine for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma — are part of CHOC’s robust early-phase clinical trials program, according to Dr. Chenue Abongwa, pediatric neuro-oncologist at CHOC.

Dr. Chenue Abongwa
Dr. Chenue Abongwa, pediatric neuro-oncologist at CHOC

CHOC also partners with some of the country’s foremost healthcare institutions, including Mayo Clinic, to apply the latest genomic sequencing and molecular studies in studying each individual tumor.

When a patient presents with a brain tumor, a wide range of specialists are involved from the beginning. “We have a multidisciplinary neuro-oncology tumor board that includes neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists and a neuro-oncologist, and we involve other specialists as needed,” says Dr. Abongwa. “This expertise allows us to select the treatment likely to be the best option for each child while minimizing the risk of side effects.”

Each patient at CHOC is treated via an individualized, precision medicine approach. When surgery is necessary, CHOC has four highly experienced, board-certified pediatric neurosurgeons who can apply some of the most advanced surgical capabilities. “We have the latest in surgical navigation, and we partner with neurologists at CHOC to offer surgical neuromonitoring to track certain nerve potentials during resections,” says Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery at CHOC and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute. “If we’re operating near the brain stem, it’s important to know if there’s potential for damage in surrounding structures.”

Dr. Suresh Magge
Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery at CHOC and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute

Several of the surgical therapies CHOC offers are minimally invasive alternatives to craniotomy. One example is endoscopic surgery, which may be appropriate for tumors located in the ventricles. Neurosurgeons can visualize and resect these tumors using an endoscope inserted through a small incision.

“Certain tumors, especially those located deep in the brain, are amenable to laser interstitial thermal therapy (laser ablation),” Dr. Magge says. “This has revolutionized the treatment of certain types of lesions. We can insert a catheter through a small incision down to the deep part of the brain and ablate the tumor without harming surrounding structures. A ROSA™ (robotic stereotactic assistance) robot allows us to insert the laser with a high degree of precision. Patients experience minimal blood loss and typically go home within a day.”

Once treatment concludes, patients ultimately enter the Neuro-Oncology Treatment Program’s longstanding late effects program. This multidisciplinary program provides long-term follow-up of patients and connects them with specialists who can treat endocrine, neurocognitive, psychosocial and other side effects of treatment.

“For some tumors, such as medulloblastomas, we’ve reached the point where we’re achieving good rates of cure, as high as 80% or more,” Dr. Abongwa says. “So now we’re focused on minimizing the long-term effects of treatment. Most institutions don’t have a strong, long-term follow-up program for pediatric patients. Over time, our program has become quite robust and multidisciplinary. That’s another area of benefit that we offer our patients. We’re a child- and family-focused institution. That focus is evident in all the programs and services that are available to our patients.”

Our Care and Commitment to Children Has Been Recognized

CHOC Hospital was named one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in its 2020-21 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings and ranked in the cancer specialty.

Learn how CHOC’s pediatric oncology treatments, expertise and support programs preserve childhood for children in Orange County, Calif., and beyond.

I’m a pediatric neurosurgeon. Here’s why I’m excited about the technology at our fingertips.

By Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery at CHOC, and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute

Even as a child, I was fascinated with science, and it was ultimately the concept of using science and technology to help people that drew me to medicine. Today, I’m more excited and optimistic than ever about our ability as clinicians to provide best-in-class treatment to the patients we have the privilege to care for – particularly in a minimally invasive way.

While every effort is made for nonsurgical intervention, neurosurgery can often be the answer to saving or improving a child’s life. At CHOC, we are committed to creating a personalized treatment plan for each child, based on his or her needs.

When surgery is necessary, we strive to perform minimally invasive surgery whenever possible for the myriad benefits it brings our patients. Minimally invasive neurosurgery offers a smaller incision, less pain, minimal blood loss, shorter time spent in the operating room, shorter recovery time, shorter hospital stays and hidden scarring.

There are a number of tools that we use to make surgery less invasive. For example, we can use a small camera, called an endoscope, to look inside the brain without having to make a large incision. In some surgeries, we can use a specialized robot, called a ROSA robot, to allow for precise placement of catheters or electrodes, and to operate on tiny areas of the brain.

Here are four surgeries I’m excited about as a pediatric neurosurgeon. In each surgery, the child is asleep and does not feel any pain during surgery. 

  1. Endoscopic surgery — This option for many types of brain surgery allows the neurosurgeon to identify and treat conditions deep within the brain. A tube-like instrument with a camera is inserted into the brain through a small incision in the skull. In some cases, we can insert the tube through the nose and avoid making any incisions in the skull. This allows the neurosurgeon to have a clear picture of the tumor. Then, we use specialized surgical instruments to remove the tumor or damaged area. When possible, we use this technique for brain tumors, hydrocephalus, arachnoid cysts, craniosynostosis and skull base surgery. In treating craniosynostosis, endoscopic surgery can replace larger and more invasive surgeries but still achieve excellent outcomes.
  2. Responsive neurostimulation (RNS therapy) —The RNS system is similar to a heart pacemaker. By monitoring brain waves, it can detect seizure activity and then the system can respond to stop the seizure. What simultaneously amazes me and comforts families about this piece of technology is that patients can’t feel the device once it’s programmed. They don’t feel pain or anything unusual. Studies show RNS therapy reduces seizures and improves quality of life for most people who have used it.
  3. Deep brain stimulation This surgical treatment can offer lasting relief for many children who experience abnormal movements. CHOC offers DBS surgery for children with movement disorders of all degrees, including very complex cases. We are one of the only centers in the world to use a multiple stage approach that allows us to better target the correct areas of the brain, without the need to wake a child during surgery. DBS surgery at CHOC involves the placement of electrodes in the brain and wires that connect to a stimulator device implanted in the chest. The device is like a pacemaker; it sends impulses to the electrodes that tell the brain to stop or minimize uncontrolled movements throughout the body. Our specialized team places up to 12 electrodes, when needed, to target different areas of the brain to attain a good outcome. Surgeries take place in a state-of-the-art operating room at CHOC, which includes the latest navigation system for safer, more precise procedures and the ROSA 3D-mapping robotic system that aids surgeons in locating the exact areas to operate.
  4. Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy (LITT) – Also known as laser ablation, this emerging technology provides pediatric patients with epilepsy and other conditions a range of benefits more traditional procedures can’t match and offers a potential solution for brain tumors that are hard to reach with traditional surgery. Instead of doing a craniotomy where a large incision is made to open up the skull, the neurosurgeon first makes a small hole in the skull just a few millimeters in a diameter. Then, under MRI visualization, the neurosurgeon can precisely position the laser probe and deliver heat to the specific area, which destroys the abnormal tissue. Laser ablation is especially useful in patients with tumors or seizure-generating abnormalities deep within the brain. Precision is essential in implanting the catheter, which guides the laser, since it allows the neurosurgeons to limit the thermal energy delivered to the tumor area only. Most LITT is minimally invasive and requires a short time in the operating room, and patients are often able to go home the next day.

Throughout my career, I’ve been fortunate to see firsthand how neurosurgery has advanced tremendously over the years, particularly through research and innovation.

I’ve had the privilege of studying and providing care at a number of institutions – Harvard, the National Institutes of Health, the University of Pennsylvania, Boston Children’s Hospital, and Children’s National Hospital (Washington, DC) — before coming to CHOC. At each of these institutions, it’s evident that through innovative technology and minimally invasive surgery, we as neurosurgeons can alleviate suffering and have a significant impact on the lives of children.

As a team here at CHOC, we always ask ourselves, “What is the best thing we can do for each child in the least invasive method, with the least amount of pain?” and then we try to do it in the most compassionate way possible.

It’s an exciting time in medicine, in part thanks to advances in technology — especially the pieces of technology that allow us to provide these minimally invasive surgical options that make a true impact on children and their families.

For more information about the CHOC Neuroscience Institute, click here.

Research Shows Endoscopic Strip Craniectomy is Strong Alternative to Open Approaches for Craniosynostosis

Minimally invasive endoscopic strip craniectomy offers a strong alternative for infants with craniosynostosis, according to a growing body of research in pediatric neurosurgery.

“The data has been clear that this is a very effective surgery with excellent results, and it’s less invasive than the traditional open approaches for treating craniosynostosis,” says Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery at CHOC and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute. “A lot of the research that we and other groups have done shows that results are either as good or can even be better in certain aspects of facial growth compared to open vault reconstruction.”

Dr. Suresh Magge
Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery at CHOC and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute.

Dr. Magge’s research on the topic has included:

Traditional surgery for craniosynostosis is an open cranial vault reconstruction, in which a surgical team takes apart the skull in order to reshape the skull plates. If craniosynostosis is diagnosed early enough – preferably before four months of age – minimally invasive endoscopic surgery can correct this condition. Small incisions are made and, using a camera, the fused portions of the skull are removed.

While both the traditional cranial vault reconstruction and the minimally invasive surgery can offer excellent surgical results, the minimally invasive approach generally involves less blood loss and swelling, smaller incisions, reduced need for blood transfusions, less time under anesthesia and shorter hospital stays. Pediatric patients usually go home the day after surgery. Once surgery is completed, the patient is fitted for a cranial molding helmet he or she must wear for a few months that helps guide the skull correction over time.

“We have an outstanding craniofacial team, including neurosurgeons, plastic surgeons and maxillofacial surgeons, here at CHOC, and we strive to offer an individualized approach to each patient,” Dr. Magge says. “Physicians need to know that craniosynostosis requires an early diagnosis so that parents have the option of the minimally invasive surgery. At the same time, we want to give parents different options when it comes to surgery.”

Dr. Magge recently joined CHOC after an 11-year tenure as a pediatric neurosurgeon at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., where he started the medical center’s minimally invasive craniosynostosis program and was the director of neurosurgery fellowship training. He completed his neurosurgery residency training at the University of Pennsylvania and his pediatric neurosurgery fellowship training at Boston Children’s Hospital.

While Dr. Magge has a wide-ranging clinical practice, his special clinical and research interests include craniosynostosis, brain and spinal tumors, especially diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas, and pediatric neurovascular disease, including arteriovenous malformation and Moyamoya disease. In his new role at CHOC, Dr. Magge looks forward to contributing to the growth of CHOC’s neurosurgical programs, including the brain tumor program, neurovascular program, epilepsy program, robotic surgeries and more. 

“It’s such an exciting time here at CHOC, from how we’re building and growing our programs to driving clinical innovation, as well as training the next generation of pediatric neurosurgeons through our affiliation with the University of California, Irvine,” Dr. Magge says. “We’re always asking ourselves, ‘What’s the best thing we can do for each child in the least invasive manner with the least amount of pain?’ and then doing so in a compassionate manner.”

Our Care and Commitment to Children Has Been Recognized

CHOC Hospital was named one of the nation’s best children’s hospitals by U.S. News & World Report in its 2020-21 Best Children’s Hospitals rankings and ranked in the neurology/neurosurgery specialty.

USNWR Neurology and Neurosurgery award

Learn how CHOC’s neuroscience expertise, coordinated care, innovative programs and specialized treatments preserve childhood for children in Orange County, Calif., and beyond.

Virtual pediatric lecture series: Minimally invasive surgery for craniosynostosis

CHOC’s virtual pediatric lecture series continues with “Minimally invasive surgery for craniosynostosis.

This online discussion will be held Thursday, Jan. 14 from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and is designed for general practitioners, family practitioners and other healthcare providers.

Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute, will discuss several topics, including:

  • Diagnosing craniosynostosis and differentiating craniosynostosis from plagiocephaly.
  • Recognizing the early signs of craniosynostosis and understanding when to refer a patient to a neurosurgeon.
  • Differentiating open versus minimally invasive treatment of craniosynostosis.
Dr. Suresh Magge, medical director of neurosurgery and co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute

This virtual lecture is part of a series provided by CHOC that aims to bring the latest, most relevant news to community providers. You can register here.

CHOC is accredited by the California Medical Association (CMA) to provide continuing medical education for physicians and has designated this live activity for a maximum of one AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Continuing Medical Education is also acceptable for meeting RN continuing education requirements, as long as the course is Category 1, and has been taken within the appropriate time frames.

Please contact CHOC Business Development at 714-509-4291 or BDINFO@choc.org with any questions.

In the spotlight: Dr. Suresh Magge

CHOC is excited to welcome pediatric neurosurgeon Dr. Suresh Magge as co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute and neurosurgery medical director for CHOC, bringing a wealth of expertise that will continue to advance the institute as a leading destination for care.

Dr. Magge will bring clinical experience, innovation and the latest techniques to CHOC, following an 11-year tenure at Children’s National Hospital in Washington, D.C., where he started the medical center’s neurosurgery fellowship training program and was the director of medical student education in pediatric neurosurgery.

“My approach is to meld the latest in clinical medicine and research to find the best treatment for each child,” Dr. Magge says. “I always try to use a patient-centered approach, using precision medicine to perform the most minimally-invasive surgery possible.”

 Dr. Suresh Magge, co-medical director of the CHOC Neuroscience Institute and neurosurgery medical director

While Dr. Magge has a wide-ranging clinical practice, his special clinical and research interests include brain and spinal tumors, especially diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas; minimally invasive craniosynostosis surgery; and pediatric neurovascular disease, including arteriovenous malformation and Moyamoya disease.

Craniosynostosis refers to the premature fusion of the skull, causing problems with skull growth. During his time at Children’s National Hospital, Dr. Magge started the region’s first minimally invasive craniosynostosis program – something he is looking forward to expanding at CHOC.

“This condition used to require a large surgery in which the surgeon would take apart the skull and put it back together,” Dr. Magge says. “Kids generally do well after the surgery, but it is quite invasive. Now we can do a less invasive surgery that uses minimally invasive techniques that is shorter, involves less blood loss, and quicker surgical recovery. This is an alternative that I’m excited to expand here.”

He also looks forward to contributing to the growth of CHOC’s brain tumor program, neurovascular program, epilepsy program, robotic surgeries and more.

Even as a child, Dr. Magge was fascinated with science. He loved everything from chemistry to biology, but it was ultimately the concept of using science to help people that drew him to medicine.

After graduating from Harvard Medical School, during which he completed the Howard Hughes Research Fellowship at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Magge completed his residency in neurosurgery at the University of Pennsylvania.

He found that pediatric neurosurgery was his life’s calling, and he then completed a fellowship in pediatric neurosurgery at Boston Children’s Hospital. He has since been in practice at Children’s National Hospital before coming to CHOC.

“Neurosurgery has advanced tremendously over the years through research and innovation,” he says. “Through surgery, we can alleviate suffering and have a significant impact on the lives of children.”

Pediatric neurosurgery allows Dr. Magge to combine his love of science with helping children and families through their toughest times.  

“When parents hear that their child needs neurosurgery, it’s a very traumatic time,” he says. “We try to take a personalized approach and take parents through this process in the most compassionate way possible.”

Dr. Magge is excited about the growth of CHOC’s neurosurgery division and neuroscience institute. He says that the strength of the Neuroscience Institute comes from the collaboration of different neurological providers within one institute.

He joins an expert team of neurosurgeons, including Dr. Michael Muhonen, former co-medical director of the Neuroscience and former neurosurgery medical director, whose numerous contributions in the role made an invaluable impact on children and families. Dr. Muhonen will remain in active clinical practice at CHOC, with an increased focus on hydrocephalus clinical care, research and new technology design.  

The neurosurgery division also includes Dr. William Loudon, who has years of experience in pediatric neurosurgery and brain tumor research, and Dr. Joffre Olaya, who specializes in epilepsy and functional neurosurgery. 

“We have four highly trained, highly respected pediatric neurosurgeons with many years of experience,” Dr. Magge says. “Each surgeon brings a wealth of experience and a personalized approach.”

Dr. Magge plans to advance the path of the Neuroscience Institute toward becoming a world-class destination for neurological care. He plans to expand neuroscience research programs, saying that the ultimate goal is to cure neurologic disease through research, as well as to educate future pediatric neurosurgeons in partnership with UC Irvine.

Further, Dr. Magge’s appointment coincides with significant infrastructure changes underway at the Neuroscience Institute: CHOC recently opened its new state-of-the-art outpatient center, establishing a clinical hub for caregivers to serve patients and families in a centralized location. Additionally, plans are underway to expand the hospital’s inpatient neuroscience unit.

Throughout Dr. Magge’s years of neurosurgery, he has learned about resiliency from his patients. “I am constantly inspired by the strength and perseverance that patients and families show in the face of adversity.”

A parent himself, Dr. Magge enjoys spending time with his wife and two young sons. Together, they ride bikes, play sports, hike and travel – especially to national parks. A competitive tennis player growing up, he still likes to play tennis when he can and also enjoys dabbling in photography.

Learn more about the CHOC Neuroscience Institute.